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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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The Capitol Buildings, &c. Alluding to the present condition of the Federal Capitol, a writer says: Its costly and elaborately finished apartments were already so greatly defaced and abused that the arrival of a Southern army for its destruction will be scarcely necessary. It seems probable that Mr. Lincoln will have sufficiently done the work before he gets through. In the frescoed wall of the Capitol nails are driven for the hanging of accoutrements, sides of bacon, &c, and the places occupied by some of the troops are said to appear not only very dirty, but to smell so. The latest arrivals of recruits from Pennsylvania were from the vicinity of Pittsburgh, and it is stated they presented a most sorry appearance, many half shod, half dressed and decidedly unclean. All our Northern friends on the march through Maryland complain that they find the climate very hot.. If this be the case thus early in the season, what will be the effect in July?
3d Sections of the 4th Article of the Present Constitution, and insert the following in lien thereof: Taxation shall be equal and uniform throughout the Commonwealth, and all property shall be taxed in proportion to its value, which shall be ascertained in such manner as may be prescribed by law; but any property may be exempted from taxation by the vote of a majority of the whole number of members elected to each House of the General Assembly. This Ordinance shall take effect on the first day of July next, when ratified by a majority of the Votes of the people of this Commonwealth, cast at a poll to be taken thereon on the fourth Thursday in May next, in pursuance of a Schedule hereafter to be enacted. Done in Convention, in the city of Richmond, on the twenty sixth day of April, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and in the eighty-fifth year of the Commonwealth of Virginia. A true copy. Jno L. Eubank,Secretary of the Convention.
oubtedly.) But they can be consummated by the 1st of November; and by that time the North, holding the continent from Richmond, Va., to Memphis, Tenn, will be ready to commence operations against the Gulf rebels. This should not be begun before November. It would be fatal to send troops South in the summer." What does this wonderful man call Memphis ! If it is not South enough in Southern heat and all the diseases of a Southern climate, we know less of Southern localization than Harper does of military science. But waiving that, let us proceed. In November, Mr. Harper will move two armies, one in transports from New York, the other down the Mississippi. The one is to retake every Fort, Arsenal, Custom-House and Post-Office in the Southern States on the Atlantic; the other to serve directly in Baton Rouge and New Orleans Both are expected to perform their work by the 1st of January next. Such is the plan recommended by "Harper's Weekly and Journal of Civilization," long
January, 11 AD (search for this): article 4
ich event would be best for the North." Do you hear that, old Kentucky ! Do you hear that, sons of the men who annihilated the flower of Europe's veterans at New Orleans, and ten thousand of whom could lay waste every town in Ohio.--Old Kentucky ! Bullied by Harper's Weekly ! Having thus disposed of matters as far South as Memphis, the great strategist remarks:"It will probably take the whole summer to consummate these operations.-- (Undoubtedly.) But they can be consummated by the 1st of November; and by that time the North, holding the continent from Richmond, Va., to Memphis, Tenn, will be ready to commence operations against the Gulf rebels. This should not be begun before November. It would be fatal to send troops South in the summer." What does this wonderful man call Memphis ! If it is not South enough in Southern heat and all the diseases of a Southern climate, we know less of Southern localization than Harper does of military science. But waiving that, let us proc
Resigned. --Major Lloyd J. Beall, late of the United States Army, has resigned his commission, and has gone to Montgomery to offer his services to the Confederate States. He is a native of Maryland. His father served as a captain in Howard's Veteran Brigade, in 1775.
May 6th, 1777 AD (search for this): article 6
An Old document. A friend has placed in our hands a faded piece of paper which has come down from Revolutionary times. On one side is printed the following: [State of Massachusetts.] In the House of Representatives, May 6, 1777. Resolved, That all such men as may enlist as noncommissioned officers and private soldiers into the Continental regiments to be commanded by Colonels Lee and Jackson, shall be considered as part of the proportion of each town for which they shall so in list. Sent up for concurrence. J. Warren, Speaker. In Council, May 8, 1777. Read and concurred. John Avery, Dep. Sec'y Consented to by the major part of the Council. A true copy. (Attest,) John Avery, Dep Sec'y. On the other is a manuscript letter, still distinct and legible, written in a bold and manly hand: Sunbury, May 18, 1777. Col. Jackson-- Sir: --I have been through five or six different towns, and have seen the
May 8th, 1777 AD (search for this): article 6
me down from Revolutionary times. On one side is printed the following: [State of Massachusetts.] In the House of Representatives, May 6, 1777. Resolved, That all such men as may enlist as noncommissioned officers and private soldiers into the Continental regiments to be commanded by Colonels Lee and Jackson, shall be considered as part of the proportion of each town for which they shall so in list. Sent up for concurrence. J. Warren, Speaker. In Council, May 8, 1777. Read and concurred. John Avery, Dep. Sec'y Consented to by the major part of the Council. A true copy. (Attest,) John Avery, Dep Sec'y. On the other is a manuscript letter, still distinct and legible, written in a bold and manly hand: Sunbury, May 18, 1777. Col. Jackson-- Sir: --I have been through five or six different towns, and have seen the committees and militia officers, who informed me that the men who were drafted chose rather
May 18th, 1777 AD (search for this): article 6
lonels Lee and Jackson, shall be considered as part of the proportion of each town for which they shall so in list. Sent up for concurrence. J. Warren, Speaker. In Council, May 8, 1777. Read and concurred. John Avery, Dep. Sec'y Consented to by the major part of the Council. A true copy. (Attest,) John Avery, Dep Sec'y. On the other is a manuscript letter, still distinct and legible, written in a bold and manly hand: Sunbury, May 18, 1777. Col. Jackson-- Sir: --I have been through five or six different towns, and have seen the committees and militia officers, who informed me that the men who were drafted chose rather to pay the fine of 10 pounds than go themselves into the service. I have left no stone unturned. Wherever I have heard of a man that had the least inclination to in list, I have rode after him; but to very little purpose, for I have not been able, with all my endeavors, to engage a single man. I
y81,98410,000 Pennsylvania350,00075,000 Ohio280,00046,000 other States846,86425,600 Total2,301,264261,100 "We have carefully estimated the number of these men that would be available for services outside these several States. It is, as stated, 261,100. Although all the figures given are the latest officially received by the war Department, some of them record the strength of the militia twenty years ago Vermont, for instance, is put down in the Army Register for 1861 as recorded in 1843, and it is nearly thirty years since Indians' returns were sent in, so that the grand aggregate must be over 3,600,000 by this time, and the available force quite 261,100, which is the customary proportionate estimate of those figures had we counted the available material at the registered at length, it would be 110,000; but this must necessarily be below the mark, how, let us glance at the opposing Army. Kentucky being almost pledged to cast her fortunes with her sister States, we include t
54650,000 New Jersey81,98410,000 Pennsylvania350,00075,000 Ohio280,00046,000 other States846,86425,600 Total2,301,264261,100 "We have carefully estimated the number of these men that would be available for services outside these several States. It is, as stated, 261,100. Although all the figures given are the latest officially received by the war Department, some of them record the strength of the militia twenty years ago Vermont, for instance, is put down in the Army Register for 1861 as recorded in 1843, and it is nearly thirty years since Indians' returns were sent in, so that the grand aggregate must be over 3,600,000 by this time, and the available force quite 261,100, which is the customary proportionate estimate of those figures had we counted the available material at the registered at length, it would be 110,000; but this must necessarily be below the mark, how, let us glance at the opposing Army. Kentucky being almost pledged to cast her fortunes with her sister
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