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st, and his wife seemed quite pleasant. From there I went to the Waterstons, who had invited a few friends at their hotel, among whom was Madame Laugel Daughter of Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman. (Ante, vol. II. pp. 189, 195, 238, 260.) Her husband, Auguste Laugel (1830–), has been the secretary of the Duc d'aumale, and is distinguished as a writer on literature and politics. and her French husband. I have not seen her since she stood with her mother at the antislavery fairs in Boston. April 6. Michel Chevalier called to-day, and invited me to dine this evening. Dinner pleasant; nobody present but himself and wife, a prefect, and a judge. From there went to the Comtesse de Circourt's, where was a pleasant company. April 7. Still suffering from My cold; kept in the house nearly all day. Dined at the Club Des Chemins de Fer, on invitation of Comte Treilhard; Adolphe Treilhard (1815-1880), a judge and councillor of state. about eleven at table. April 8. Went to Poissy, ab
Her husband, Auguste Laugel (1830–), has been the secretary of the Duc d'aumale, and is distinguished as a writer on literature and politics. and her French husband. I have not seen her since she stood with her mother at the antislavery fairs in Boston. April 6. Michel Chevalier called to-day, and invited me to dine this evening. Dinner pleasant; nobody present but himself and wife, a prefect, and a judge. From there went to the Comtesse de Circourt's, where was a pleasant company. April 7. Still suffering from My cold; kept in the house nearly all day. Dined at the Club Des Chemins de Fer, on invitation of Comte Treilhard; Adolphe Treilhard (1815-1880), a judge and councillor of state. about eleven at table. April 8. Went to Poissy, about fifteen miles from Paris, to see the cattle show. Kergorlay was to have been his companion, but was prevented by illness. I have seen larger in Kentucky. The ceremonies on the distribution of the prizes were interesting. Too tire
fairs in Boston. April 6. Michel Chevalier called to-day, and invited me to dine this evening. Dinner pleasant; nobody present but himself and wife, a prefect, and a judge. From there went to the Comtesse de Circourt's, where was a pleasant company. April 7. Still suffering from My cold; kept in the house nearly all day. Dined at the Club Des Chemins de Fer, on invitation of Comte Treilhard; Adolphe Treilhard (1815-1880), a judge and councillor of state. about eleven at table. April 8. Went to Poissy, about fifteen miles from Paris, to see the cattle show. Kergorlay was to have been his companion, but was prevented by illness. I have seen larger in Kentucky. The ceremonies on the distribution of the prizes were interesting. Too tired for the theatre or society; went to bed before ten o'clock. April 9. M. Vattemare Alexander Vattemare (1796-1864), who made international exchanges of duplicate books and works of art his specialty. called and took me with Mr. E.
Dined at the Club Des Chemins de Fer, on invitation of Comte Treilhard; Adolphe Treilhard (1815-1880), a judge and councillor of state. about eleven at table. April 8. Went to Poissy, about fifteen miles from Paris, to see the cattle show. Kergorlay was to have been his companion, but was prevented by illness. I have seen larger in Kentucky. The ceremonies on the distribution of the prizes were interesting. Too tired for the theatre or society; went to bed before ten o'clock. April 9. M. Vattemare Alexander Vattemare (1796-1864), who made international exchanges of duplicate books and works of art his specialty. called and took me with Mr. E. Brooks to the Palais de l'industrie. Afterwards I went with him to the Museum of the French Colonies; then to the Bibliotheque du Louvre, which is the private library of the sovereign. Among the specialties here is a unique collection on Petrarch, made by an Italian, Professor Masson, whose life and soul were absorbed by this
April 10th (search for this): chapter 13
e Bibliotheque du Louvre, which is the private library of the sovereign. Among the specialties here is a unique collection on Petrarch, made by an Italian, Professor Masson, whose life and soul were absorbed by this idea. Here also are the ornamented books which have belonged to the recent sovereigns. In the evening went to Mr. Brooks's, where I met M. and Madame Mohl, Julius Mohl (1800-1876). Madame Mohl, nee Mary Clarke, was born in 1793, and died in 1882. and also the professor. April 10. Called on M. Vattemare, who showed me his American collection. Took him to drive through the old quarter of Paris as far as the Barriere du Trone, and then paid a pilgrimage to the quiet tomb of Lafayette, in a little cemetery where there is no common dust; all there were of the ancient nobility on earth. Went to St. Roch, also to the Madeleine. The theatres, which to-day are closed, give place to the church. Good Friday; in the evening called on Mr. and Mrs. Leroy of New York. Apri
April 11th (search for this): chapter 13
ility.—1857-1858. Sumner's journey from New York to Paris was by the same route which he traversed by sailing vessel and stage-coach nineteen years before. The condition of his health during the voyage is described in the New York Tribune, April 11, 13. Reaching Paris by way of Havre and Rouen, March 23, he found there American and English friends to welcome him,—among the former T. G. Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson, and Madame Laugel; and among the latter, Nassau W. Senior. Hiso common dust; all there were of the ancient nobility on earth. Went to St. Roch, also to the Madeleine. The theatres, which to-day are closed, give place to the church. Good Friday; in the evening called on Mr. and Mrs. Leroy of New York. April 11. Received a pleasant visit from Mr. Senior of England, who told me something of friends there; in the evening dined with the Comte de Treilhard at the Ancien Cercle; afterwards went to Madame Mohl's, where I had been invited to dine, to meet amo
April 12th (search for this): chapter 13
nny Lind; I should place her in the same category of physical natures. Her manner was amiable and intelligent. In a short conversation which I had with her, she mentioned the voyage as an insurmountable objection to visiting America. She spoke warmly of Maria Stuardo; and when I objected that it was a translation, and said that when I listened to Italian I wish to have one of the classics of the langue, she differed entirely, and still contended for her favorite, even against Alfieri. April 12. Visited Mr. Senior and talked of English friends, and of our American affairs; then to the Hotel de Cluny and Palais des Thermes, which I found very interesting. Such a storehouse of curiosities in America would be most attractive. Visited the Pantheon and other churches; revived my recollections of the Law School and the Sorbonne; dined with Appleton; afterwards for a, little while to the Opera Comique, which I left before it was over to get home to bed. April 13 Breakfasted by invi
April 13th (search for this): chapter 13
1857-1858. Sumner's journey from New York to Paris was by the same route which he traversed by sailing vessel and stage-coach nineteen years before. The condition of his health during the voyage is described in the New York Tribune, April 11, 13. Reaching Paris by way of Havre and Rouen, March 23, he found there American and English friends to welcome him,—among the former T. G. Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson, and Madame Laugel; and among the latter, Nassau W. Senior. His first attractive. Visited the Pantheon and other churches; revived my recollections of the Law School and the Sorbonne; dined with Appleton; afterwards for a, little while to the Opera Comique, which I left before it was over to get home to bed. April 13 Breakfasted by invitation with Mr. Senior. Among the guests were M. de Tocqueville and Lord Granville. Other guests were Jobez, Marcet, and Barthelemy St. Hilaire. N. W. Senior gives an account of conversations at this and other dates where
April 14th (search for this): chapter 13
particularly M. Le Verrier, Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier, astronomer and senator. (1811-1877.) who had a fresh and young look; dined with Appleton, and went with him to hear Ristori in Maria Stuardo. The Italian language was delicious to hear, much more than the French. It seemed to me that the beauty of her acting had not been exaggerated. When the play was over, I was inclined to think that I had never before seen so good an actor, with so much power and so little exaggeration. April 14. Was with Appleton for some time selecting a dessert service for the Longfellows; then went to M. Vattemare, who took me to a creche, where the little children of laborers are kept during the day; then to the Corps Legislatif, which is the old Palais Bourbon, where I visited particularly the excellent library, and then the Chamber, and traversed the corridors of the bureaus. Went to De Tocqueville's on invitation; found him as usual amiable and interesting, and full of feeling against sla
April 15th (search for this): chapter 13
bureaus. Went to De Tocqueville's on invitation; found him as usual amiable and interesting, and full of feeling against slavery. He was unwilling that France should be judged by the writings of George Sand, whose morality he condemned. I met there a granddaughter of Lafayette, Mademoiselle de Corcelle, Afterwards the wife of the Marquis de Chambrun (1831-1891), who lived in Washington for many years. and her father, who was French Minister at Rome at the time of the difficulties. April 15. Breakfasted at eleven o'clock with Mr. Senior, where were M. Guizot, M. Remusat, M. de Tocqueville, De Corcelle, Lord Granville, De Circourt, etc. I had never met Guizot before. His appearance is prepossessing, and his conversation eloquent. The question was asked which of the foreign accents of persons speaking French was least agreeable to Frenchmen. Guizot said at once the German; and the others joined in this, except Remusat, who said the Spanish. Guizot mentioned that Louis Philip
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