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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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April 27th (search for this): article 7
Bottle picked up. --On the 27th April, a bottle was picked up on Cape Charles, containing the following memorandum in pencil: On Board U. S. Teansport, R. R. Cuyler, April 23d, 1861. To all whom this may concern, Greeting: Started from New York city Sunday, April 21st, at 5:30 P. M. in company with the Columbia and Baltic, U. S. steamer Harris Lane, convoy. Arrived off Cape Henry April 23d at 9½ o'clock A. M. There are no accommodations on board; the men have to live like dogs. About 800 members of the Regiment present. Have had a rough passage, nearly all the men sick. Publish as soon as found. Company H. 71st Regiment, N. Y. S. T., A. Henry Embler, 1st Serg't. Amos L. Ler, 2d Serg't. John W. Walton, 3d Serg't. L. P. Hartshorne, 4th Serg't. Peter Foreman, 5th Serg't. Sanford Udals, 1st Corp'l. Death to Chas. M. Sanford!
April 28th (search for this): article 2
one hundred men, to protect the ship. The steamers Alabama and Marion had arrived at Annapolis. Concord, N. H. April. 28 --Our City Council has appropriated $10,000 to aid the volunteers from this city. At Great Falls to-day the churrevolver, bowie-knife and blanket.--The citizens have subscribed over $10,000 in aid of the volunteers. Boston, April. 28 --Our volunteers go into the harbor forts on Monday. On Tuesday another 1,000 men leave this city for the South.n these steamers were seized, our flag was hauled down and the secession flag hoisted and saluted. Chicago, Ill. April.28 --A gentleman has Just returned to this city, from a business tour through Alabama and Mississippi, leaving Mobilee next call of the Government, are before the Legislature. Both bills will probably pass to-morrow. Harrisburg. April 28 --There is general rejoicing here over the new requisition, the rejected volunteers being exceedingly glad. C
April 29th (search for this): article 1
here the influence of the Seventh Regiment becomes of importance. "Please consider the suggestions I have now to make: It is, instead of fighting the Seventh Regiment back to the bay, they be granted by the Maryland irregulars, gathering between here and Washington, a free passage, in compliment to the qualities which adorn them individually." "As to the ungainly troops from Massachusetts, I have nothing to say respecting them. " From Annapolis. A letter from Annapolis, April 29 says: Yesterday (Sunday) presented a spectacle in the ancient city which has not been witnessed for years. Some two hundred soldiers attended worship at St. Mary's (Catholic) Church, while others were busily engaged in carting supplies from the Naval Academy to the depot for transportation to Washington. The laborers in the yard were also busily engaged in unloading ships which came in during the morning, while others were erecting plank quarters, &c. But the most novel scene,
April 29th (search for this): article 10
More troops. Montgomery, April 29. --Sixteen well drilled companies of volunteers and one negro company, from Nashville, Tenn., have offered their services to the Confederate States.
April 29th (search for this): article 2
Telegraphic Dispatches. Washington, April. 29 --There is good reason for stating that the Naval Academy is to be removed, at least temporarily, from Annapolis to Newport, Sheds Island. It was ascertained at the State Department to-day that no more diplomatic and consular appointments will be made, and no consideration. given to the subject, until all the avenues leading to the Capital are opened for the passage of citizens and United States troops. New York, April. 29 --The steamer R. R. Cuyler arrived from Annapolis to-night, with the frigate Constitution in tow, with 250 midshipmen from the Naval Academy, twenty-five seam 1,000 marched to Alexandria on Thursday. The officers at Harper's Ferry believe that General Beauregard is at Richmond with 7,000 troops. Philadelphia, April.29 --Advices from Richmond are very interesting. Governor Letcher has seized all light draught vessels and steamers for purposes. The regular liners Yorktow
April 29th (search for this): article 3
Still Later from Europe. St. John's, April 29. --The steamship Adriatic arrived this afternoon, from Galway 23d. The Africa arrived out on the 22d. Political news generally unimportant. It is stated that Lord Russell has issued a writ of execution against the steamer Great Eastern. Prince Napoleon demands satisfaction of the Duc d' Aumale for reflections in the latter's pamphlets. Numerous failures have occurred at Marseilles. Garibaldi insists on the re-organization of the Southern Italian army. The measure was opposed by Count Cavour, but the Chambers subsequently passed an order establishing the army. Commercial. Liverpool, April 22. --Cotton active — sales of 15,000 bales. Breadstuffs closed dull.--Provisions steady. Consols closed at 91½ a 92.
April 29th (search for this): article 4
From Annapolis. A letter from Annapolis, April 29 says: Yesterday (Sunday) presented a spectacle in the ancient city which has not been witnessed for years. Some two hundred soldiers attended worship at St. Mary's (Catholic) Church, while others were busily engaged in carting supplies from the Naval Academy to the depot for transportation to Washington. The laborers in the yard were also busily engaged in unloading ships which came in during the morning, while others were erecting plank quarters, &c. But the most novel scene, in this quiet, religious city, was the departure of a portion of the Eighth Regiment (New York) for Washington, having the clatter of a full drum corps in deadening blast as they passed through the principal streets. However, just as this body had passed through the city an April shower came down in its fullest severity, and the troops returned to the yard and took quarters at the hospital, where they remained until this morning and then depart
April 29th (search for this): article 5
War movements in Pennsylvania. Harrisburg, April 29. --Full preparations are making here to rebuild the bridges destroyed on the line of the Northern Central Railroad. The Pennsylvania. Railroad Company has loaned the Government a number of iron bridge frames, A gang of carpenters, 250 strong, and other workmen of approved skill, have been quietly concentrated at York since Saturday. They will be protected by troops as they advance, Sills and heavy beams of timber have been forwarded, to be used whenever necessary, with any amount of lumber, from this point. The five regiments now here will move tomorrow for York. The intention is to guard every bridge with troops all the way to Baltimore. When the troops reach that point, they will pass around to the Relay House, at the Junction of the Washington Branch of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which will be permanently occupied. Gov. Curtin sent a message to the Legislature to-day, embracing the recommendations alr
April 29th (search for this): article 6
Sundries. --Isaac, slave of M. Wortham, carried before the Recorder, yesterday, for breaking a window in Alfred Hardingham's store and stealing twelve pairs of shoes, was acquitted. --Stine & Blum, charged with keeping their house open after 10 o'clock on the night of the 29th April were also acquitted. The case of Bernard and Myer Myer, for threatening to cut Harris Jacobs, was dismissed at the request of the complainant, on payment of costs.--Mary, slave of Philip Nelson, was awarded punishment for the use of insulting language to the wife of Morris Nelson.
April 29th (search for this): article 6
Movement of troops in Georgia. Augusta, April 29. --The following companies of the Third and Fourth Regiments of Georgia are now at and passing through Augusta for Virginia: The Baldwin Blues, Capt. George Doles, 76, rank and file; Twiggs Volunteers Capt. Jas. Folsom, 74; Brown Rifles, Capt. R. B. Nisbot, 75; Home Guards, Capt. James S. Reid, 81; Southern Rifles Captain B. Colley, as; Lagrange Light Guards, Captain E. S. Smith, 85 West Point Guards, Captain J. J. Matthews, 80; Glover Guards, Capt. George T. Bartlett, 83; Young Guards, Capt. A. H. Lee, 87; Sumter Light Guards, Capt. W. L. Johnson, 83; Albany Guards, Capt. Y. G. Rust, 79; Dawson Graye, Capt. R. L. McWhorter, 80; Confederate Light Guard, Capt. E. J. Walker, 81; Athena Guard, Capt. Henry G. Bellups, 60; Barke Guard, Capt. W. C. Musgrave, 84; Wilkinson Rifles, Capt. William O. 78; Blodget Volunteers, Capt. Foster Blodget Jr., 96. [The last two companies reached Richmond yesterday.]
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