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he Bois to hear the music of the bands in the Pre Catalan. Dined with Appleton; in the evening, Theatre Francais, where I enjoyed very much Fiammina. May 10. Went to Versailles, merely to see the waters play, without entering the Museum. All the jets seemed feeble by the side of that on Boston Common. In the evening went to French opera, where was the ballet of the Corsaire, given by order; in the imperial box were the emperor and empress, and their guest the Grand Duke Constantine. May 11. Made calls; Among them was one on Dowager Lady Elizabeth Bruce, mother of Sir Frederick Bruce. dined with Appleton; weary; gave up society and theatre; passed evening at home alone, reading French grammar. May 12. Went to St. Denis and saw the resting-place of the kings of France; returned the call of Major Poussin; went to the salon of Madame Meynier, who has just written an excellent article showing the inconsistency of slavery and Christianity. There I met M. Passy; also M. Coquer
entering the Museum. All the jets seemed feeble by the side of that on Boston Common. In the evening went to French opera, where was the ballet of the Corsaire, given by order; in the imperial box were the emperor and empress, and their guest the Grand Duke Constantine. May 11. Made calls; Among them was one on Dowager Lady Elizabeth Bruce, mother of Sir Frederick Bruce. dined with Appleton; weary; gave up society and theatre; passed evening at home alone, reading French grammar. May 12. Went to St. Denis and saw the resting-place of the kings of France; returned the call of Major Poussin; went to the salon of Madame Meynier, who has just written an excellent article showing the inconsistency of slavery and Christianity. There I met M. Passy; also M. Coquerel, 1795-1868. He heard Coquerel preach at this time or in 1858-1859. He introduced, October, 1871, the younger Coquerel to an audience in Boston. Works, vol. XIV. pp. 311-312. the eloquent preacher, and Mrs. Stowe
to St. Denis and saw the resting-place of the kings of France; returned the call of Major Poussin; went to the salon of Madame Meynier, who has just written an excellent article showing the inconsistency of slavery and Christianity. There I met M. Passy; also M. Coquerel, 1795-1868. He heard Coquerel preach at this time or in 1858-1859. He introduced, October, 1871, the younger Coquerel to an audience in Boston. Works, vol. XIV. pp. 311-312. the eloquent preacher, and Mrs. Stowe. May 13. Visited the Institution des Jeunes Aveugles. Went to St. Germain, the old retreat of the Stuarts, enjoyed the view from the terrace, and dined with Sir Charles Grey. 1786-1865. At his table met Mrs. Bland, an agreeable lady, daughter of the late Mr. Wharton, of Philadelphia, married to an Englishman, and now residing here; reached home just before midnight. May 14. Passed some time at the Louvre; visited the studio of Mr. Kellogg, an American artist; admired very much a portrait on h
the younger Coquerel to an audience in Boston. Works, vol. XIV. pp. 311-312. the eloquent preacher, and Mrs. Stowe. May 13. Visited the Institution des Jeunes Aveugles. Went to St. Germain, the old retreat of the Stuarts, enjoyed the view from the terrace, and dined with Sir Charles Grey. 1786-1865. At his table met Mrs. Bland, an agreeable lady, daughter of the late Mr. Wharton, of Philadelphia, married to an Englishman, and now residing here; reached home just before midnight. May 14. Passed some time at the Louvre; visited the studio of Mr. Kellogg, an American artist; admired very much a portrait on his easel: also enjoyed a collection he has made, among which is a picture which seems to be a Raphael, and another a Leonardo da Vinci; dined with the Laugels, where was De Tocqueville; afterwards went to the reception of Jules Simon, where I met republicans, among whom were Carnot Lazare Hippolyte Carnot (1801-1888). a St. Simonist, author, deputy, senator, son of the
picture which seems to be a Raphael, and another a Leonardo da Vinci; dined with the Laugels, where was De Tocqueville; afterwards went to the reception of Jules Simon, where I met republicans, among whom were Carnot Lazare Hippolyte Carnot (1801-1888). a St. Simonist, author, deputy, senator, son of the war minister who organized victory, and father of the President of the French republic. and Henri Martin 1810-1883. the historian. Their feeling against Louis Napoleon was bitter. May 15. Visited the Bibliotheque Imperiale, also the Hotel des Monnaies, and the Institution des Sourds-Muets. At the latter I was much struck by the deaf and dumb, who had learned to articulate simply by watching the lips of a person who spoke; dined with Appleton, where I met Captain Lynch, William F. Lynch (1805-1865), explorer of the Dead Sea. who told me many pleasant things of Ferruk Khan, the Persian ambassador. May 16. Visited the Bibliotheque d'arsenal, then the chatteau at Vincenne
he historian. Their feeling against Louis Napoleon was bitter. May 15. Visited the Bibliotheque Imperiale, also the Hotel des Monnaies, and the Institution des Sourds-Muets. At the latter I was much struck by the deaf and dumb, who had learned to articulate simply by watching the lips of a person who spoke; dined with Appleton, where I met Captain Lynch, William F. Lynch (1805-1865), explorer of the Dead Sea. who told me many pleasant things of Ferruk Khan, the Persian ambassador. May 16. Visited the Bibliotheque d'arsenal, then the chatteau at Vincennes, then Pere la Chaise; dined at the Cafe Anglais as the guest of a few Americans here. May 17. Through the kindness of Comte de Kergorlay, attended a concert of about twelve hundred voices of young musicians under the auspices of the city of Paris; Orpheon sous la direction de M. Ch. Gounod. dined wit Michel Chevalier; at dinner was a Russian prince, also the famous Émile Pereire, 1800-1875. the head of the Credit Mobi
Sourds-Muets. At the latter I was much struck by the deaf and dumb, who had learned to articulate simply by watching the lips of a person who spoke; dined with Appleton, where I met Captain Lynch, William F. Lynch (1805-1865), explorer of the Dead Sea. who told me many pleasant things of Ferruk Khan, the Persian ambassador. May 16. Visited the Bibliotheque d'arsenal, then the chatteau at Vincennes, then Pere la Chaise; dined at the Cafe Anglais as the guest of a few Americans here. May 17. Through the kindness of Comte de Kergorlay, attended a concert of about twelve hundred voices of young musicians under the auspices of the city of Paris; Orpheon sous la direction de M. Ch. Gounod. dined wit Michel Chevalier; at dinner was a Russian prince, also the famous Émile Pereire, 1800-1875. the head of the Credit Mobilier; afterwards went to Comte de Montalembert; he was unwell, but I saw his wife and daughter. May 18. Visited the Observatory, but could not obtain admission;
the Cafe Anglais as the guest of a few Americans here. May 17. Through the kindness of Comte de Kergorlay, attended a concert of about twelve hundred voices of young musicians under the auspices of the city of Paris; Orpheon sous la direction de M. Ch. Gounod. dined wit Michel Chevalier; at dinner was a Russian prince, also the famous Émile Pereire, 1800-1875. the head of the Credit Mobilier; afterwards went to Comte de Montalembert; he was unwell, but I saw his wife and daughter. May 18. Visited the Observatory, but could not obtain admission; spent some time examining the collection of the École des Mines; next went to the region of medicine, examined the Musee Dupuytren and plunged into the dissecting rooms, strong with the stench of human flesh; in the evening was too tired for society or theatre; took to my room and books. May 19. Started early for Versailles, abandoning my morning exercise with my teacher; went through the Trianons, and then through the great museum
1800-1875. the head of the Credit Mobilier; afterwards went to Comte de Montalembert; he was unwell, but I saw his wife and daughter. May 18. Visited the Observatory, but could not obtain admission; spent some time examining the collection of the École des Mines; next went to the region of medicine, examined the Musee Dupuytren and plunged into the dissecting rooms, strong with the stench of human flesh; in the evening was too tired for society or theatre; took to my room and books. May 19. Started early for Versailles, abandoning my morning exercise with my teacher; went through the Trianons, and then through the great museums; returned to town at the beginning of the evening, too tired for anything but my room. I could hardly read my grammar. May 20. Made calls; then went to Ville d'avray, about nine miles from Paris, to find my old friend Tchihatcheff. He had gone to the steeplechase, not far off; I followed; saw the running and leading of horses, but not my friend; we
ext went to the region of medicine, examined the Musee Dupuytren and plunged into the dissecting rooms, strong with the stench of human flesh; in the evening was too tired for society or theatre; took to my room and books. May 19. Started early for Versailles, abandoning my morning exercise with my teacher; went through the Trianons, and then through the great museums; returned to town at the beginning of the evening, too tired for anything but my room. I could hardly read my grammar. May 20. Made calls; then went to Ville d'avray, about nine miles from Paris, to find my old friend Tchihatcheff. He had gone to the steeplechase, not far off; I followed; saw the running and leading of horses, but not my friend; went back to his house, where I saw his new wife; A Scotch lady. M. de Tchihatcheff died in Florence, Italy, Oct. 13, 1890, at the age of eighty-two. Ante, vol. i. p. 242. The writer in visits to that city in 1879, 1882, and 1889 enjoyed his conversation at his apartm
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