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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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to be the first engineer in the service. lie had greatly distinguished himself in Mexico, and shared with Beauregard the highest honors of that campaign. It was Scott's practice never to patronize subordinate talent, although all his renown was achieved by it; so that while he continually thrust himself upon popular favor, and obtained the highest rank possible in the service, he never spoke q word in favor of those to whom he was undoubtedly indebted for his greatness. For all that Scott and the War Office cared, Lee might have lived and died a lieutenant-colonel, while others infinitely inferior to him were promoted for political reasons. Virginia most southern point of the peninsula,) and greatly annoyed General Butler, who then commanded the fortress. Butler was tempted to open the campaign of 1861 before Scott, by marching upon Magruder in the hope of overwhelming him. Having made his preparations, he found the Confederates posted at the village of Little Bethel, and was
ah slowly and cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together with those already in the valley, might make a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's Ferry; and our rear from Drainsville. It was thought by some that our movement would be directly westward into the Shenandoah, to Jackson, distant thirty miles; but a heavy force of the enemy was between that point an
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 20
ied the right pit. Reenforcements crossing the dam were obstructed by the dead, the wounded, and those seeking to return, so that scores fell right and left into the swamp, and were half buried in mud and water. The saddest part is yet to tell. Smith, who commanded the Yankee brigade, seeing his men overcome and slaughtered in the battery, ordered Ayers's twenty-two guns to open fire, in order to cover the retreat, but in doing this, their shells killed as many of their own men as of ours. T affair, all regretted one thing, namely, that the gentlemen in blue had not proved to be Massachusetts men. There was not a regiment in the service but would have willingly marched fifty miles for a fair fight with double the number of them. Smith, the Federal Commander, kept up the cannonade till long after sundown, but with more destruction to his own wounded than to us; for as we screened ourselves during the fire, it did not cause us the loss of a man. This conduct, if nothing more wer
ry, and almost simultaneously our batteries on the Lower Potomac became wonderfully silent. The Federals claimed a great. success over them; but the truth was all guns were quietly removed and the batteries abandoned long before the gunboats gave their final shellings. A great move was evidently preparing by both parties, but few could guess its object. Banks and others at Harper's Ferry were in great force, and were beginning to move up the Shenandoah slowly and cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together with those already in the valley, might make a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to dra
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 20
la from Yorktown to Richmond. When the war broke out, Robert E. Lee was a lieutenant-colonel of cavalry in the United States army, but was generally considered to be the first engineer in the service. lie had greatly distinguished himself in Mexico, and shared with Beauregard the highest honors of that campaign. It was Scott's practice never to patronize subordinate talent, although all his renown was achieved by it; so that while he continually thrust himself upon popular favor, and obtaithat while Northern troops had never fought South during the Revolution of 1776, Southern armies had traversed all the North, and had left their bones on every battle-field. The same is equally true of the war of 1812, and of the expedition into Mexico, for the impartial student will be surprised at the numbers lost by us compared with the North in those transactions, and at the number of times the Cotton States have shown in the front, in every movement of danger. All this, however, was not c
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
retreat was certainly one of the finest things of the war and the brilliancy of its, design and execution presaged a glorious summer campaign. Se perfectly were all things arranged and so quietly performed, that all stores, baggage, sick, materiel, and guns were removed far to the rear before any of us could realize the possibility of retreat; and it was not until our brigade, after several days' march over hills and impassable roads, came upon the main army defiling southward through Fauquier County, that we discovered the movement to be a general and not a partial one. All were in the finest spirits, and the line of march was so perfect and orderly that not a hundred stragglers were seen at any time, and the continual tramp of columns was as regular as if on parade. This great retreat was undoubtedly a master feat of the originator; but the exact schedule of movements, routes, time of junction, transportation, and a thousand other important points were calculated and fulfilled w
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
es to his native State. His patrimony was situated on Arlington Heights, overlooking Washington, and he knew every inch of the ground and all its capabilities. He had indeed occupied it with a small force, but was ordered to fall back to Fairfax Court-House by the Minister of War. He was the only man capable of filling the seat of Minister of War, and, upon going to Richmond, was installed in that office, and fulfilled its Herculean duties with great talent and despatch. The line of the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers was selected by him as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, u
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ight be the ruling powers when crops grew, and hence did not sow. When our whole army had crossed the Rappahannock, it was drawn up in line, and waited a week for the enemy, hoping to entice them into an engagement; but McClellan refused the challenge, and moved down the stream near the seaboard. To contract our left, all fell back across the Rapidan, and increased the strength of the right against all flanking manoeuvres. Large fleets of transports were gathered at the mouth of the Rappahannock, but few knew their object or destination. Lee, however, who was now commander-in-chief, closely watched the Federal movements, and perceived that while making a show of force along the Lower Rappahannock, they would certainly not attack; their object being to transport their force with great celerity to the Yorktown Peninsula, thinking to surprise Magruder at Yorktown, and quietly seize Richmond before any troops could be marched to oppose them. This undoubtedly was McClellan's design
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
though their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's Ferry; and our rear from Drainsville. It was thought by some that our movement wpatients: If I was only a Yankee, the darned doctors would do more for-me than now. The dead, on all practicable occasions, were decently buried; and in many cases I have known putrid carcases handled and coffined by our men, and even a board placed at the head of the grave, as at Leesburgh, with the words: Here lies a Yankee; Co. H, Fifteenth Massachusetts. I am emphatic about this subject, for many infamous misrepresentations have been widely circulated regarding us by the Northern press
Snickersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Movements in Virginia, and opening of the campaign, April, 1862 troops begin to move on the Upper Potomac in march McClellan prepares to flank Manassas by marching heavy masses up the Shenandoah Valley, and crossing the mountains at Snickersville a general retreat is ordered by Johnston he retires to Culpeper Court House, and makes his line behind the Rappahannock ruse of the enemy, and design upon Yorktown the approach to Richmond in that direction is not so easy as conjectured our present position, and were tightening the lines around us every day. An column had sought the Blue Ridge, and were passing south-westward, evidently intending to flank and get in the rear of Johnston by passing through the mountain gap at Snickersville. This, of course Johnston wisely foresaw, and during winter had been quietly transporting his immense stores towards the Rappahannock, removing every cannon that could be spared, and filling the empty embrasures with hollow logs, painted bl
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