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up of mine and Hurlbut's divisions, belonging to the old Army of the Tennessee, and two new ones, made up from the fragments of the divisions of Prentiss and C. F. Smith, and of troops transferred thereto, commanded by Generals T. W. Sherman and Davies. General George H. Thomas was taken from Buell, to command the right. McClernand's and Lew Wallace's divisions were styled the reserve, to be commanded by McClernand. General Grant was substantially left out, and was named second in command, acdiers. These were General Grant's immediate antagonists, and so many and large detachments had been drawn from him, that for a time he was put on the defensive. In person he had his headquarters at Corinth, with the three divisions of Hamilton, Davies, and McKean, under the immediate orders of General Rosecrans. General Ord had succeeded to the division of McClernand (who had also gone to Washington), and held Bolivar and Grand Junction. I had in Memphis my own and Hurlbut's divisions, and ot
on of Fort Pillow, which occurred about June 1st; soon followed by the further withdrawal of the Confederate army from Memphis, by reason of the destruction of the rebel gunboats in the bold and dashing attack by our gunboats under command of Admiral Davis, who had succeeded Foote. This occurred June 7th. Admiral Farragut had also captured New Orleans after the terrible passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip on May 24th, and had ascended the river as high as Vicksburg; so that it seemed as thvictory, had ordered him to pursue instantly, notifying him that he had ordered Ord's and Hurlbut's divisions rapidly across to Pocahontas, so as to strike the rebels in flank. On the morning of the 5th, General Ord reached the Hatchie River, at Davis's bridge, with four thousand men; crossed over and encountered the retreating army, captured a battery and several hundred prisoners, dispersing the rebel advance, and forcing the main column to make a wide circuit by the south in order to cross
, I consolidated my four brigades into three, which were commanded: First, Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith; Second, Colonel John A. McDowell; Third, Brigadier-General J. W. Denver. About the same time I was promoted to major-general of volunteers. The Seventy-first Ohio was detached to Clarksville, Tennessee, and the Sixth a a place called Russell's we had a sharp affair of one brigade, under the immediate direction of Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith, assisted by the brigade of General Denver. This affair occurred on the 19th of May, and our line was then within about two miles of the northern intrenchments of Corinth. On the 27th I received orthe former to support our left flank, and the latter our right flank. The next morning early, Morgan L. Smith's brigade was deployed under cover on the left, and Denver's on the right, ready to move forward rapidly at a signal. I had a battery of four twenty-pound Parrott guns, commanded by Captain Silversparre. Colonel Ezra Tay
the Ohio River at Louisville. The army of Van Dorn and Price had been brought from the trans-Misa wide circuit by the south, and again joined Van Dorn. On the 6th of September, at Memphis, I reorced to use every man, for he knew well that Van Dorn could attack him at pleasure, at any point ofhundred miles of railway, and as much river. Van Dorn had forty thousand men, united, at perfect liuccessful dashes at the Coldwater, compelling Van Dorn to cover it by Armstrong's whole division of in force on Bolivar or Corinth; and on the 2d Van Dorn made his appearance near Corinth, with his enes at the intersection of the two railroads. Van Dorn closed down on the forts by the evening of theels of this mass of confused and routed men, Van Dorn's army would surely have been utterly ruined; as it was, Van Dorn regained Holly Springs somewhat demoralized. General Rosecrans did not begin government was then at its maximum strength; Van Dorn was reenforced, and very soon Lieutenant-Gene[3 more...]
round to the Tennessee, and to come in person to command there. The gunboat fleet pushed on down the Mississippi, but was brought up again all standing by the heavy batteries at Fort Pillow, about fifty miles above Memphis. About this time Admiral Farragut, with another large sea-going fleet, and with the cooperating army of General Butler, was entering the Mississippi River by the Passes, and preparing to reduce Forts Jackson and St, Philip in order to reach New Orleans; so that all minds wer the further withdrawal of the Confederate army from Memphis, by reason of the destruction of the rebel gunboats in the bold and dashing attack by our gunboats under command of Admiral Davis, who had succeeded Foote. This occurred June 7th. Admiral Farragut had also captured New Orleans after the terrible passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip on May 24th, and had ascended the river as high as Vicksburg; so that it seemed as though, before the end of June, we should surely have full possession
and Pillow, had fallen back from Columbus, Kentucky, to Island Number10 and New Madrid. This army had the full cooperation of the gunboat fleet, commanded by Admiral Foote, and was assisted by the high flood of that season, which enabled General Pope, by great skill and industry, to open a canal from a point above Island Number10the rebel army and its available line of supply and retreat. At the very time that we were fighting the bloody battle on the Tennessee River, General Pope and Admiral Foote were bombarding the batteries on Island Number10, and the Kentucky shore abreast of it; and General Pope having crossed over by steamers a part of his army to y from Memphis, by reason of the destruction of the rebel gunboats in the bold and dashing attack by our gunboats under command of Admiral Davis, who had succeeded Foote. This occurred June 7th. Admiral Farragut had also captured New Orleans after the terrible passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip on May 24th, and had ascended t
d military skill. General Bragg had reorganized the army of Beauregard at Tupelo, carried it rapidly and skillfully toward Chattanooga, whence he boldly assumed the offensive, moving straight for Nashville and Louisville, and compelling General Buell to fall back to the Ohio River at Louisville. The army of Van Dorn and Price had been brought from the trans-Mississippi Department to the east of the river, and was collected at and about Holly Springs, where, reenforced by Armstrong's and Forrest's cavalry, it amounted to about forty thousand brave and hardy soldiers. These were General Grant's immediate antagonists, and so many and large detachments had been drawn from him, that for a time he was put on the defensive. In person he had his headquarters at Corinth, with the three divisions of Hamilton, Davies, and McKean, under the immediate orders of General Rosecrans. General Ord had succeeded to the division of McClernand (who had also gone to Washington), and held Bolivar and G
e reserve, to be commanded by McClernand. General Grant was substantially left out, and was named hin range of our guns and line of battle. Generals Grant and Thomas happened to be with me during tave kept. Chewalla, June 6, 1862. Major-General Grant. my dear sir: I have just received ythe District of West Tennessee, vacated by General Grant. By this time, also, I was made aware thaints, that no use could be made of it, and General Grant had to employ the railroads, from Columbusl Bragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, preparember, at Memphis, I received an order from General Grant dated the 2d, to send Hurlbut's division tng to about six thousand men. The whole of General Grant's men at that time may have aggregated fifrning, the 5th, and it was then too late. General Grant was again displeased with him, and never bs forward at Grand Junction and Hernando. General Grant, in like manner, was reenforced by new reg[19 more...]
General Halleck, on the 1st of October, that his position was precarious, but I hope to get out of it all right. In Memphis my business was to hold fast that important flank, and by that date Fort Pickering had been made very strong, and capable of perfect defense by a single brigade. I therefore endeavored by excursions to threaten Van Dorn's detachments to the southeast and east. I repeatedly sent out strong detachments toward Holly Springs, which was his main depot of supply; and General Grierson, with his Sixth Illinois, the only cavalry I had, made some bold and successful dashes at the Coldwater, compelling Van Dorn to cover it by Armstrong's whole division of cavalry. Still, by the 1st of October, General Grant was satisfied that the enemy was meditating an attack in force on Bolivar or Corinth; and on the 2d Van Dorn made his appearance near Corinth, with his entire army. On the 3d he moved down on that place from the north and northwest. General Rosecrans went out some
s rebel army, at and near Tiptonville. General Halleck still remained at St. Louis, whence he gaision. In a few days after the battle, General Halleck arrived by steamboat from St. Louis, pitcth. On the 27th I received orders from General Halleck to send a force the next day to drive then which was the farm-house referred to in General Halleck's orders. At the farther end of the fiel was turned west to Bolivar and Memphis. General Halleck took post himself at Corinth, assigned Li to the end of the war; but, on the 29th, General Halleck notified me that a division of troops undy, July 6th, I got a telegraph order from General Halleck, of July 2d, sent me by courier from Mosc would come next. The extreme caution of General Halleck also indicated that something had gone wrion of civil affairs. At the time when General Halleck was summoned from Corinth to Washington, hese forces: so that the great army which General Halleck had so well assembled at Corinth, was put[8 more...]
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