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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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June 30th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Meridian, June 30, 1864 General: I have the honor to transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and myself, which I consider very important, and should be laid before the Department. It will be my endeavor to avoid, as far as is consistent with my idea of the dignity of my position, resorting to such an extremity as the black flag; and the onus shall be with the Federal commander. I would like that the onus be put where it properly belongs, before the public, should the extremity arise. The correspondence is not complete yet, and the Department will be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to Gener
July 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
al Forrest's report, in regard to making disposition of Federal wounded left on the field at Fort Pillow, and think it is correct. I accompanied Captain Anderson on the day succeeding the battle to Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. A true copy: Samuel Donalson, Lieutenant and A. D. C. Official: Henry B. Lee, A. D C. General Washburn to General Forrest. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., July 2, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo: General: Your communications of the twentieth and twenty-third ult. are received. Of the tone and temper of both I do not complain. The desperate fortunes of a bad cause excuse much irritation of temper, and I pass it by. Indeed, I received it as a favorable augury, and as evidence that you are not indifferent to the opinions of the civilized world. In regard to the Fort Pillow affair, it is useless to prolon
July 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
as the opinion of the garrison, at the time of the assault, that General Forrest was not in the vicinity of the fort. The commanding officer refused to surrender. When the final assault was made, I was captured at my post, inside the works, and have been treated as a prisoner of war. John T. Young, Captain, Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. F. W. Underhill, First Lieutenant Cavalry. General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, C. S. A., Meridian, Miss.: General: Your letter of the twenty-eighth ult, in reply to mine of the seventeenth ult., is received. The discourtesy which you profess to discover in my letter I utterly disclaim. Having already discussed at length, in a correspondence with Major-General Forrest, the Fort Pillow massacre, as well as the policy to be pursued in regard to colored troops, I do not
September 13th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
isapprehensions by informing you that most of them have returned to their respective commands, their search for their late masters having proved bootless; and I think I do not exaggerate in assuring you that there is not a colored soldier here who does not prefer the fate of his comrades at Fort Pillow to being returned to his master. I remain, General, Yours, very respectfully, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. Captain J. T. Young to General Washburn. Memphis, Tennessee, September 13th, 1864. Major General C. C. Washburn, commanding District West Tennessee: General: I have the honor to address you in regard to certain papers forwarded you by Major-General Forrest, of the so-called Confederate army, signed by me under protest, whilst a prisoner of war at Cahaba, Alabama. I would first call your attention to the manner by which these papers were procured. About twenty-seventh April last, all Federal prisoners (except colored soldiers) were sent to Andersonville and Mac
Charles W. Anderson (search for this): chapter 62
ies of a statement of Captain Young, the senior officer of that garrison, together with (sufficient) extracts from a report of the affair by my A. D. C., Captain Chas. W. Anderson, which I approve and endorse as correct. As to the death of Major Bradford, I knew nothing of it until eight or ten days after it is said to have occury respectfully, Your obedient servant, Jno. T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. P. S.--I have examined a report said to be made by Captain Anderson (of) A. D. C. to Major-General Forrest, appendix to General Forrest's report, in regard to making disposition of Federal wounded left on the field at Fort Pillow, and think it is correct. I accompanied Captain Anderson on the day succeeding the battle to Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. A true copy: Samuel Donalson, Lieutenant and A. D. C. Official: Henry B. Lee, A. D C. General Washburn to General Forrest.
L. F. Booth (search for this): chapter 62
t Fort Pillow was Major Bradford, who had charge of the defence of the fort after the fall of Major Booth. After being taken prisoner, he was started, with other prisoners of war, in charge of Colnd made by Major-General Forrest C. S. A., for the surrender of Fort Pillow, Tennessee: Major Booth, commanding U. S. Forces, Fort Pillow, Tennessee: I have force sufficient to take your wor commander of gunboat No. 7, at this place. I have the honor to be Your obedient servant, L. F. Booth, Major, commanding U. S. Forces. Major L. F. Booth, commanding United States Forces: I doMajor L. F. Booth, commanding United States Forces: I do not demand the surrender of the gunboat No. 7. I ask only for the surrender of Fort Pillow, with men and munitions of war. You have twenty minutes for consideration. At the expiration of that timeer of my forces is received. The demand will not be complied with. Your obedient servant, L. F. Booth, Major, commanding U. S. Forces, Fort Pillow Colonel H. C. Davis : I give you the above f
J. D. Bradford (search for this): chapter 62
the prisoners captured at Fort Pillow was Major Bradford, who had charge of the defence of the fortrom Brownsville the column was halted, and Major Bradford taken about fifty yards from the roadside endorse as correct. As to the death of Major Bradford, I knew nothing of it until eight or ten dd the report I had of the affair was this: Major Bradford was, with other officers, sent to the heade in charge of one of McCulloch's regiments. Bradford requested the privilege of attending the burio by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or take was no chance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckwortthe affair. In regard to the treatment of Major Bradford, I refer you to the testimony contained inruthful citizens of Brownsville, that when Major Bradford was started under an escort from your head apparently as an offset to this affair of Major Bradford, to outrages said to have been committed b[1 more...]
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 62
Colonel McCulloch, and all the prisoners were in charge of one of McCulloch's regiments. Bradford requested the privilege of attending the burial of his brother, which was granted, he giving his parole of honor to return. Instead of returning, he changed his clothing and started for Memphis. Some of my men were hunting deserters and came on Bradford just as he had landed on the south bank of the Hatchie, and arrested him. When arrested, he claimed to be a Confederate soldier belonging to Bragg's army, that he had been on furlough, and was then on his way to join his command. As he could show no papers he was believed to be a deserter, and was taken to Covington, and not until he was recognized and spoken to by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brownsville via La Grange, and as all the other prisoners had been gone some time, and there was no chance for the
Louis M. Buford (search for this): chapter 62
14, 1864. Major-General Washburn, commanding United States Forces, Memphis: General: I have the honor herewith to enclose copy of letter received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding United States forces at Helena, Arkansas, addressed to Colonel E. W. Rucker, commanding Sixth regiment of this command; also a letter from myself to General Buford, which I respectfully request you will read and forward to him. There is a matter also to which I desire to call your attention, which, until now, I have not thought proper to make the subject of a communication. Recent events render it necessary — in fact, demand it. It has been reported to me that 9, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: General: Your communication of the fourteenth instant is received. The letter to Brigadier-General Buford will be forwarded to him. In regard to that part of your letter which relates to colored troops, I beg to say that I have already sent a communication
was recognized and spoken to by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brownsville via La Grange, and as all the other prisoners had been gone some time, and there was no chance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckworth or General Chalmers to be sent south to me at Jackson. I knew nothing of the matter until eight or ten days afterwards I heard that his body was found near Brownsville. I understand that he attempted to escape and was shot. If he was improperly killed, nothing would afford mthat I have it from responsible and truthful citizens of Brownsville, that when Major Bradford was started under an escort from your headquarters at Jackson, General Chalmers remarked that he would never reach there. You call attention, apparently as an offset to this affair of Major Bradford, to outrages said to have been comm
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