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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Meridian, June 30, 1864 General: I have the honor to transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and myself, which I consider very important, and should be laid before the Department. It will be my endeavor to avoid, as far as is consistent with my idea of the dignity of my position, resorting to such an extremity as the black flag; and the onus shall be with the Federal commander. I would like that the onus be put where it properly belongs, before the public, should the extremity arise. The correspondence is not complete yet, and the Department will be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to Genera
Samuel Cooper (search for this): chapter 62
avor to avoid, as far as is consistent with my idea of the dignity of my position, resorting to such an extremity as the black flag; and the onus shall be with the Federal commander. I would like that the onus be put where it properly belongs, before the public, should the extremity arise. The correspondence is not complete yet, and the Department will be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in the field, June 14, 1864. Major-General Washburn, commanding United States Forces, Memphis: General: I have the honor herewith to enclose copy of letter received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding United States forces at Helena, Arkansas, addressed to Colonel E. W. Rucker, commanding Sixth regiment of this command; also a letter from myself to General Buford, which I r
H. C. Davis (search for this): chapter 62
. I am, General, Yours, very respectfully, N. B. Forrest, Major-General. Official Memoranda. Cahaba hospital, Cahaba, Alabama, May 11, 1864. Colonel H. C. Davis commanding Post Cahaba: Colonel: I herewith transmit you, as near as my memory serves me, according to promise, the demand made by Major-General Forrest render of my forces is received. The demand will not be complied with. Your obedient servant, L. F. Booth, Major, commanding U. S. Forces, Fort Pillow Colonel H. C. Davis : I give you the above for your own satisfaction from memory. I think it is true in substance. My present condition would preclude the idea of this beixaggerated, I also thought that his own official report was equally so in some particulars. Here the matter rested about one week, when I was sent for by Colonel H. C. Davis, commander of post at Cahaba, who informed me that General Forrest had sent P. T. Scroggs to see me, and have a talk with me about the Fort Pillow fight. I
Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Meridian, June 30, 1864 General: I have the honor to transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and myself, which I consider very important, and should be laid before the Department. It will be my endeavor to avoid, as far as is consistent with my idea of the dignity of my position, resorting to such an extremity as the black flag; and the onus shall be with the Federal commander. I would like that the onus be put where it properly belongs, before the public, should the extremity arise. The correspondence is not complete yet, and the Department will be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to Gener
Samuel Donalson (search for this): chapter 62
, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. P. S.--I have examined a report said to be made by Captain Anderson (of) A. D. C. to Major-General Forrest, appendix to General Forrest's report, in regard to making disposition of Federal wounded left on the field at Fort Pillow, and think it is correct. I accompanied Captain Anderson on the day succeeding the battle to Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. A true copy: Samuel Donalson, Lieutenant and A. D. C. Official: Henry B. Lee, A. D C. General Washburn to General Forrest. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., July 2, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo: General: Your communications of the twentieth and twenty-third ult. are received. Of the tone and temper of both I do not complain. The desperate fortunes of a bad cause excuse much irritation of temper, and I pass it by. Indeed, I receive
taken prisoner, he was started, with other prisoners of war, in charge of Colonel Duckworth, for Jackson. At Brownsville they rested over night. The following morning two companies were detailed by Colonel Duckworth to proceed to Jackson with the prisoners. After they had started, and proceeded a very short distance, five soldiers were recalled by Colonel Duckworth, and were conferred with by him; they then rejoined the column, and after proceeding about five miles from Brownsville thee roadside and deliberately shot by the five men who had been recalled by Colonel Duckworth, and his body left unburied upon the ground where he fell. He now lieso by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckworth or General Chalmers to be sent south to me at Jackson. I knew nothing
N. B. Forrest (search for this): chapter 62
eral, commanding. General Washburn to General Forrest. headquarters District of West Tennesee, Memphis, Tenn., June 19, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: am, General, yours, Very respectfully, N. B. Forrest, Major-General. General Forrest to Gen am, General, Yours, very respectfully, N. B. Forrest, Major-General. Official Memoranda. ort Pillow, Tennessee, April 12, 1864. Major-General Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: Genst. Cahaba, Alabama May 19, 1864. Major-General Forrest, C. S. A.: General: Your request, mt, and have also before me the rely of Major-General Forrest thereto. Though that reply is full, ae it will remain. In my last letter to General Forrest I stated that the treatment which Federalgain refused to sign the papers, but sent General Forrest a statement, that although I considered stestimony. He then produced papers which General Forrest wished me to sign. Upon examination, I f[35 more...]
ll the negro troops stationed in Memphis took an oath on their knees, in the presence of Major-General Hurlbut and other officers of your army, to avenge Fort Pillow, and that they would show my troough my lines in charge of the Surgeon left with them. I made such an arrangement with Major-General Hurlbut when he was in command of Memphis, and am willing to renew it, provided it is desired, all the negro troops stationed in Memphis took an oath on their knees, in the presence of Major-General Hurlbut, and other officers of our army, to avenge Fort Pillow, and that they would show your trelieve it is true that the colored troops did take such an oath, but not in the presence of General Hurlbut. From what I can learn, this act of theirs was not influenced by any white officer, but waaw, and to show you how I regard such transactions. I can refer you to my demand upon Major-General Hurlbut (no doubt upon file in your office) for the delivery to Confederate authorities of one C
Fielding Hurst (search for this): chapter 62
actions. I can refer you to my demand upon Major-General Hurlbut (no doubt upon file in your office) for the delivery to Confederate authorities of one Colonel Fielding Hurst and others of his regiment, who deliberately took out and killed seven Confederate soldiers, one of whom they left to die after cutting off his tongue, puat he would never reach there. You call attention, apparently as an offset to this affair of Major Bradford, to outrages said to have been committed by Colonel Fielding Hurst and others of his regiment (Sixth Tennessee cavalry). The outrages, if committed as stated by you, are disgraceful and abhorrent to every brave and sensitive mind. On receiving your letter I sent at once for Colonel Hurst, and read him the extract pertaining to him. He indignantly denies the charge against him, and until you furnish me the names of the parties murdered, and the time when, and the place where the offence was committed, with the names of witnesses, it is impossible
Thomas J. Jackson (search for this): chapter 62
ng the prisoners captured at Fort Pillow was Major Bradford, who had charge of the defence of the fort after the fall of Major Booth. After being taken prisoner, he was started, with other prisoners of war, in charge of Colonel Duckworth, for Jackson. At Brownsville they rested over night. The following morning two companies were detailed by Colonel Duckworth to proceed to Jackson with the prisoners. After they had started, and proceeded a very short distance, five soldiers were recalle W. Anderson, which I approve and endorse as correct. As to the death of Major Bradford, I knew nothing of it until eight or ten days after it is said to have occurred. On the thirteenth (the day after the capture of Fort Pillow) I went to Jackson, and the report I had of the affair was this: Major Bradford was, with other officers, sent to the headquarters of Colonel McCulloch, and all the prisoners were in charge of one of McCulloch's regiments. Bradford requested the privilege of atte
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