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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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neral Forrest. Cahaba, Alabama May 19, 1864. Major-General Forrest, C. S. A.: General: Your request, made through Judge P. T. Scroggs, that I should make a statement of the treatment of the Federal dead and wounded at Fort Pillow, has been made known to me. Details from Federal prisoners were made to collect the dead and wounded. The dead were buried by their surviving comrades. I saw no ill treatment of their wounded on the evening of the battle, or next morning. My friend, Lieutenant Leaming, Adjutant Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, was left wounded in the sutler's store near the fort, also a Lieutenant Sixth U. S. Artillery; both were alive next morning and sent on board U. S. transport, among many other wounded. Among the wounded were some colored troops — I don't know how many. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Jno. T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. P. S.--I have examined a report said to be made by Captain Anderson (of) A. D. C. to
Henry B. Lee (search for this): chapter 62
rect. I accompanied Captain Anderson on the day succeeding the battle to Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. A true copy: Samuel Donalson, Lieutenant and A. D. C. Official: Henry B. Lee, A. D C. General Washburn to General Forrest. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., July 2, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo: General: Your communications of the twentnt, I beg leave to enclose a copy of General Orders No. 100 from the War Department Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, April twenty-four, 1863. I have the honor to be, sir, Very respectfully yours, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. General Lee to General Washburn. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisian, Meridian, June 28, 1864. Major-General C, C. Washburn, commanding Federal Forces at Memphis, Tennessee: General: I am in receipt of your letter of th
official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Depoment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. arest, Major-General General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., June 17, 1864. Major-General S. D. Lee, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupe at Tupelo. Having understood that Major-General S. D. Lee was in command there, I directed my l seventeenth instant, addressed to Majbr-General S. D. Lee, or Officer commanding Confederate forces near Tupelo. I have forwarded it to General Lee, with a copy of this letter. I regard your levery respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General, commanding. EnclosuLieutenant Cavalry. General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tenness, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mis
ten days after it is said to have occurred. On the thirteenth (the day after the capture of Fort Pillow) I went to Jackson, and the report I had of the affair was this: Major Bradford was, with other officers, sent to the headquarters of Colonel McCulloch, and all the prisoners were in charge of one of McCulloch's regiments. Bradford requested the privilege of attending the burial of his brother, which was granted, he giving his parole of honor to return. Instead of returning, he changed hMcCulloch's regiments. Bradford requested the privilege of attending the burial of his brother, which was granted, he giving his parole of honor to return. Instead of returning, he changed his clothing and started for Memphis. Some of my men were hunting deserters and came on Bradford just as he had landed on the south bank of the Hatchie, and arrested him. When arrested, he claimed to be a Confederate soldier belonging to Bragg's army, that he had been on furlough, and was then on his way to join his command. As he could show no papers he was believed to be a deserter, and was taken to Covington, and not until he was recognized and spoken to by citizens did the guards know th
E. W. Rucker (search for this): chapter 62
e earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in the field, June 14, 1864. Major-General Washburn, commanding United States Forces, Memphis: General: I have the honor herewith to enclose copy of letter received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding United States forces at Helena, Arkansas, addressed to Colonel E. W. Rucker, commanding Sixth regiment of this command; also a letter from myself to General Buford, which I respectfully request you will read and forward to him. There is a matter also to which I desire to call your attention, which, until now, I have not thought proper to make the subject of a communication. Recent events render it necessary — in fact, demand it. It has been reported to me that all the negro troops stationed in Memphis took an oath on their knees, in the presence of Ma
P. T. Scroggs (search for this): chapter 62
ient servant, John T. Young, Captain Company A, Twenty-fourth Missouri Inf. Vols. Captain J. T. Young to Major-General Forrest. Cahaba, Alabama May 19, 1864. Major-General Forrest, C. S. A.: General: Your request, made through Judge P. T. Scroggs, that I should make a statement of the treatment of the Federal dead and wounded at Fort Pillow, has been made known to me. Details from Federal prisoners were made to collect the dead and wounded. The dead were buried by their surviving , I also thought that his own official report was equally so in some particulars. Here the matter rested about one week, when I was sent for by Colonel H. C. Davis, commander of post at Cahaba, who informed me that General Forrest had sent P. T. Scroggs to see me, and have a talk with me about the Fort Pillow fight. I found the Judge very affable and rather disposed to flatter me; he said that General Forrest thought that I was a gentleman and a soldier, and that the General had sent him (t
oops no quarter. Again, I have it from indisputable authority that the troops under Brigadier-General Sturgis, on their recent march from Memphis, publicly and in various places proclaimed that nol into your hands. I have in my possession quite a number of wounded officers and men of General Sturgis' command, all of whom have been treated as well as we were able to treat them, and are mostly in charge of a Surgeon left at Ripley by General Sturgis to look after the wounded. Some of them are too severely wounded to be removed at present. I am willing to exchange them for any men of ming Confederate Forces near Tupelo, Miss.: General: When I heard that the forces of Brigadier-General Sturgis had been driven back, and a portion of them probably captured, I felt considerable solo not intend so to do, will they be treated as prisoners of war? I have over two thousand of Sturgis' command prisoners, and will hold every officer and private hostage until I receive your declar
Badajos (Amazonas, Brazil) (search for this): chapter 62
record in the case is plainly made up, and I leave it. You justify and approve it, and appeal to history for precedents. As I have said, history furnishes no parallel. True, there are instances where, after a long and protracted resistance, resulting in heavy loss to the assailing party, the garrison has been put to the sword, but I know of no such instance that did not bring dishonor upon the commander that ordered or suffered it. There is no Englishman that would not gladly forget Badajos, nor a Frenchman that exults when Jaffa or the caves of Dahra and Shelas are spoken of. The massacre of Glencoe which the world has read of with horror for nearly two hundred years, pales into significance before the truthful recital of Fort Pillow. The desperate defence of the Alamo was the excuse for the slaughter of its brave survivors after its surrender, yet that act was received with just execration, and we are told by the historian that it led more than anything else to the indepe
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
l be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in the field, June 14, 1864. Major-General Washburn, commanding United States Forces, Memphis: General: I have the honor herewith to enclose copy of letter received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding United States forces at Helena, Arkansas, addressed to Colonel E. W. Rucker, commanding Sixth regiment of this command; also a letter from myself to General Buford, which I respectfully request you will read and forward to him. There is a matter also to which I desire to call your attention, which, until now, I have not thought proper to make the subject of a communication. Recent events render it necessary — in fact, demand it. It has been reported to me that all the negro troops stationed in Memphis took an oath on t
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ee, September 13th, 1864. Major General C. C. Washburn, commanding District West Tennessee: General: I have the honor to address you in regard to certain papers forwarded you by Major-General Forrest, of the so-called Confederate army, signed by me under protest, whilst a prisoner of war at Cahaba, Alabama. I would first call your attention to the manner by which these papers were procured. About twenty-seventh April last, all Federal prisoners (except colored soldiers) were sent to Andersonville and Macon, Georgia, myself among the number. About ten days after my arrival at Macon prison, a Confederate Captain, with two men as guard, came to that prison with an order for me to return to Cahaba. I appealed to the officer in command to know why I was taken from the other officers, but received no explanation. Many of my friends among the Federal officers who had been prisoners longer than myself felt uneasy at the proceedings, and advised me to make my escape going back, as it w
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