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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
Black flag — official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Meridian, June 30, 1864 General: I have the honor to transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and myself, which I considery respectfully yours, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. General Lee to General Washburn. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisian, Meridian, June 28, 1864. Major-General C, C. Washburn, commanding Federal Forces at Memphis, Tennessee: General: I am in receipt of your letter of the seventeenth instt of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, C. S. A., Meridian, Miss.: General: Your letter of the twenty-eighth ult, in reply to mine of the seventeenth ult., is received. The discourtesy which you profess to discover in
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
hat they should know the position you occupy and the policy you intend to pursue. I therefore respectfully ask whether my men in your hands are treated as other Confederate prisoners, also the course intended to be pursued in regard to those who may hereafter fall into your hands. I have in my possession quite a number of wounded officers and men of General Sturgis' command, all of whom have been treated as well as we were able to treat them, and are mostly in charge of a Surgeon left at Ripley by General Sturgis to look after the wounded. Some of them are too severely wounded to be removed at present. I am willing to exchange them for any men of my command you may have, and as soon as they are able to be removed will give them safe escort through my lines in charge of the Surgeon left with them. I made such an arrangement with Major-General Hurlbut when he was in command of Memphis, and am willing to renew it, provided it is desired, as it would be better than to subject them
Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
, Memphis, Tenn., June 17, 1864. Major-General S. D. Lee, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo, Miss.: General: When I heard that the forces of Brigadier-General Sturgis had been driven back,ready sent a communication on the subject to the officer in command of the Confederate forces at Tupelo. Having understood that Major-General S. D. Lee was in command there, I directed my letter toneral, commanding. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, Tupelo, June 20, 1864. Major-General C. C. Washburn, commanding U. S. Forces, Memphis, Tenn.: Generanth instant, addressed to Majbr-General S. D. Lee, or Officer commanding Confederate forces near Tupelo. I have forwarded it to General Lee, with a copy of this letter. I regard your letter as dise, Memphis, Tenn., July 2, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo: General: Your communications of the twentieth and twenty-third ult. are received. Of the to
Brownsville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ith other prisoners of war, in charge of Colonel Duckworth, for Jackson. At Brownsville they rested over night. The following morning two companies were detailed bm; they then rejoined the column, and after proceeding about five miles from Brownsville the column was halted, and Major Bradford taken about fifty yards from the rhat he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brownsville via La Grange, and as allBrownsville via La Grange, and as all the other prisoners had been gone some time, and there was no chance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckworth or Genertter until eight or ten days afterwards I heard that his body was found near Brownsville. I understand that he attempted to escape and was shot. If he was improperve heretofore said, that I have it from responsible and truthful citizens of Brownsville, that when Major Bradford was started under an escort from your headquarters
Covington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
s granted, he giving his parole of honor to return. Instead of returning, he changed his clothing and started for Memphis. Some of my men were hunting deserters and came on Bradford just as he had landed on the south bank of the Hatchie, and arrested him. When arrested, he claimed to be a Confederate soldier belonging to Bragg's army, that he had been on furlough, and was then on his way to join his command. As he could show no papers he was believed to be a deserter, and was taken to Covington, and not until he was recognized and spoken to by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brownsville via La Grange, and as all the other prisoners had been gone some time, and there was no chance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckworth or General Chalmers to be sent south to me at Jackson. I knew nothing of the matter until
La Grange (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
chie, and arrested him. When arrested, he claimed to be a Confederate soldier belonging to Bragg's army, that he had been on furlough, and was then on his way to join his command. As he could show no papers he was believed to be a deserter, and was taken to Covington, and not until he was recognized and spoken to by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brownsville via La Grange, and as all the other prisoners had been gone some time, and there was no chance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckworth or General Chalmers to be sent south to me at Jackson. I knew nothing of the matter until eight or ten days afterwards I heard that his body was found near Brownsville. I understand that he attempted to escape and was shot. If he was improperly killed, nothing would afford me more pleasure than to punish the perpetrator
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ly wounded to be removed at present. I am willing to exchange them for any men of my command you may have, and as soon as they are able to be removed will give them safe escort through my lines in charge of the Surgeon left with them. I made such an arrangement with Major-General Hurlbut when he was in command of Memphis, and am willing to renew it, provided it is desired, as it would be better than to subject them to the long and fatiguing delay necessary to a regular exchange at City Point, Virginia. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, N. B. Forrest, Major-General General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., June 17, 1864. Major-General S. D. Lee, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo, Miss.: General: When I heard that the forces of Brigadier-General Sturgis had been driven back, and a portion of them probably captured, I felt considerable solicitude for the fate of the two colored regiments that form
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
r fall into their hands, as was the case at Fort Pillow, it is but fair that it should be freely an, and other officers of our army, to avenge Fort Pillow, and that they would show your troops no qu the wholesale slaughter of the garrison at Fort Pillow, and found your assertion upon the exparte pondence between the commanding officers at Fort Pillow and myself; also copies of a statement of CForrest C. S. A., for the surrender of Fort Pillow, Tennessee: Major Booth, commanding U. S. Fg. headquarters United States forces, Fort Pillow, Tennessee, April 12, 1864. Major-General Forrestreatment of the Federal dead and wounded at Fort Pillow, has been made known to me. Details from Fenderson on the day succeeding the battle to Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. significance before the truthful recital of Fort Pillow. The desperate defence of the Alamo was the colored soldiers who were butchered at Fort Pillow after they had surrendered to their victors[22 more...]
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Meridian, June 30, 1864 General: I have the honor to transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and m863. I have the honor to be, sir, Very respectfully yours, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. General Lee to General Washburn. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisian, Meridian, June 28, 1864. Major-General C, C. Washburn, commanding Federal Forces at Memphis, Tennessee: General: I am in receineral Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, C. S. A., Meridian, Miss.: General: Your letter of the twenty-eighth ult, in reply to mine of the seventeenth ult., is receiv
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. General S. D. Lee to General Cooper. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Meridian, June 30, 1864 General: I have the honor to transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and myself, which I consider very important, and should be laid before the Department. It will be my endeavor to avoid, as far as is consistent with my idea of the dignityrs. F. W. Underhill, First Lieutenant Cavalry. General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, C. S. A., Meridian, Miss.: General: Your letter of the twenty-eighth ult, in reply to mine of the seventeenth ult., is received. The discourtesy which you profess to discover in my letter I utterly disclaim. Having already discussed a
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