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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Hatchie River (United States) (search for this): chapter 62
of the affair was this: Major Bradford was, with other officers, sent to the headquarters of Colonel McCulloch, and all the prisoners were in charge of one of McCulloch's regiments. Bradford requested the privilege of attending the burial of his brother, which was granted, he giving his parole of honor to return. Instead of returning, he changed his clothing and started for Memphis. Some of my men were hunting deserters and came on Bradford just as he had landed on the south bank of the Hatchie, and arrested him. When arrested, he claimed to be a Confederate soldier belonging to Bragg's army, that he had been on furlough, and was then on his way to join his command. As he could show no papers he was believed to be a deserter, and was taken to Covington, and not until he was recognized and spoken to by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brownsville via La Gr
F. W. Underhill (search for this): chapter 62
nced himself as being General Forrest; but the officers who accompanied the flag, being unacquainted with the General, doubted his word, and it was the opinion of the garrison, at the time of the assault, that General Forrest was not in the vicinity of the fort. The commanding officer refused to surrender. When the final assault was made, I was captured at my post, inside the works, and have been treated as a prisoner of war. John T. Young, Captain, Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. F. W. Underhill, First Lieutenant Cavalry. General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, C. S. A., Meridian, Miss.: General: Your letter of the twenty-eighth ult, in reply to mine of the seventeenth ult., is received. The discourtesy which you profess to discover in my letter I utterly disclaim. Having already discussed at length, in
C. Washburn (search for this): chapter 62
3. I have the honor to be, sir, Very respectfully yours, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. General Lee to General Washburn. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisian, Meridian, June 28, 1864. Major-General C, C. Washburn, commanding Federal Forces at Memphis, Tennessee: General: I am in receipt of your letter of the seventeenth inst, and have also before me the rely of Major-General Forrest thereto. Though that reply is full, and is approved by me, yet I dsurrender. When the final assault was made, I was captured at my post, inside the works, and have been treated as a prisoner of war. John T. Young, Captain, Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. F. W. Underhill, First Lieutenant Cavalry. General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, July 3, 1864. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee, commanding Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, C. S. A., Meridian, Miss.: General: Your letter
C. C. Washburn (search for this): chapter 62
transmit copies of correspondence between General Washburn, U. S. A., General Forrest, and myself, w G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in ervant, N. B. Forrest, Major-General General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters Districneral, commanding. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, Tupelo, June 20, 1864. Major-General C. C. Washburn, commanding U. S. Forces, Memphis, Tenn.: Generast, Major-General. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in r to be, sir, Very respectfully yours, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. General Lee to GeneraGeneral Washburn. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisian, Meridian, June 28,in, General, Yours, very respectfully, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. Captain J. T. Young ts, Tennessee, September 13th, 1864. Major General C. C. Washburn, commanding District West Tennessee[7 more...]
John Young (search for this): chapter 62
m memory. I think it is true in substance. My present condition would preclude the idea of this being an official statement. I am Colonel, your obedient servant, John T. Young, Captain Company A, Twenty-fourth Missouri Inf. Vols. Captain J. T. Young to Major-General Forrest. Cahaba, Alabama May 19, 1864. Major-General Forrest, C. S. A.: General: Your request, made through Judge P. T. Scroggs, that I should make a statement of the treatment of the Federal dead and wounded at Fote in assuring you that there is not a colored soldier here who does not prefer the fate of his comrades at Fort Pillow to being returned to his master. I remain, General, Yours, very respectfully, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. Captain J. T. Young to General Washburn. Memphis, Tennessee, September 13th, 1864. Major General C. C. Washburn, commanding District West Tennessee: General: I have the honor to address you in regard to certain papers forwarded you by Major-General Fo
John T. Young (search for this): chapter 62
Pillow and myself; also copies of a statement of Captain Young, the senior officer of that garrison, together wtement. I am Colonel, your obedient servant, John T. Young, Captain Company A, Twenty-fourth Missouri Inf.o Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. A tks, and have been treated as a prisoner of war. John T. Young, Captain, Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. F. indicate. You furnish a statement of a certain Captain Young, who was captured at Fort Pillow, and is now a pf a prisoner under duress and in the position of Captain Young should go to disprove the sworn testimony of the In relying, as you do, upon this certificate of Captain Young, you confess that all better resources are at anrest's reports, together with the certificate of Captain Young. The record in the case is plainly made up, ahonor to be, General, Your obedient servant, John T. Young, Captain Company A, Twenty-fourth Missouri, Inf
Jonathan T. Young (search for this): chapter 62
ed by their surviving comrades. I saw no ill treatment of their wounded on the evening of the battle, or next morning. My friend, Lieutenant Leaming, Adjutant Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, was left wounded in the sutler's store near the fort, also a Lieutenant Sixth U. S. Artillery; both were alive next morning and sent on board U. S. transport, among many other wounded. Among the wounded were some colored troops — I don't know how many. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Jno. T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. P. S.--I have examined a report said to be made by Captain Anderson (of) A. D. C. to Major-General Forrest, appendix to General Forrest's report, in regard to making disposition of Federal wounded left on the field at Fort Pillow, and think it is correct. I accompanied Captain Anderson on the day succeeding the battle to Fort Pillow, for the purpose above mentioned. John T. Young, Captain Twenty-fourth Missouri Volunteers. A true copy: S
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