hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 214 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 174 2 Browse Search
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
James Grant 84 0 Browse Search
City Point (Virginia, United States) 60 0 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 59 5 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 56 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 56 0 Browse Search
Robert Ould 50 6 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 43 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 646 total hits in 202 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
ffman, the commissary-general of prisoners. In 1863, Colonel A. A. Stevens of the Invalid Corps bectograph, all of the prisoners had blankets. In 1863, Colonel A. A. Stevens, of the invalid corps, btrength of the prisoners. During the summer of 1863 conditions were endurable, but as larger number captures made further provision necessary. In 1863, it was determined to build a large prison furt, Georgia, was chosen. Here was constructed in 1863-64 the structure which acquired notoriety equal it looked from the stockade, August 17, 1864 1863, labor was scarce and difficult to procure. Iterved in the prison in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In 1863, he visited Europe, one story says, carrying deew York. After exchange of prisoners ceased in 1863, though battles continued to be fought, the numelous. The favorable conditions lasted through 1863. During the early months of 1864, the capacined here, and there seemed to have been, during 1863 and the early part of 1864, comparatively few h
February, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
nsanitary. President H. W. Bellows of the Sanitary Commission says, June 30, 1862, speaking of the barracks, Nothing but fire can cleanse them, and urges the abandonment of the Camp as a prison. The place was not abandoned, however; and in February, 1863, out of 3884 prisoners, 387 died. This mortality rate, almost exactly ten per cent. for the month, was not reached in any month, in any other large prison during the war, so far as the Official Records indicate. Camp Chase, at Columbus, own under the strain of feeding both the Army of Northern Virginia and a considerable number of prisoners in Virginia. The exchange of prisoners following the agreement Camp Douglas, where ten percent of the prisoners died one month In February, 1863, out of 3,884 prisoners, 387 died at Camp Douglas in Chicago, or almost exactly ten per cent., a mortality rate for one month not reached by any other large prison during the war. The Camp was on low ground, the drainage bad, and conditions g
May 25th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
al Records indicate. Camp Chase, at Columbus, Ohio, was another instruction Camp turned into a prison to accommodate the prisoners captured at Forts Henry and Donelson, in February, 1862, and used as such until the end of the war. Conditions here were similar to those at Camp Morton in general features, as were also those at Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois, which was, however, abandoned for prison purposes in 1862. After the suspension of the agreement to exchange prisoners, May 25, 1863, the numbers in confinement began to exceed the provision made for them, and in May, 1864, some barracks on the Chemung River near Elmira, New York, were enclosed for prison purposes. Before the end of August, the number of prisoners reached almost ten thousand. Conditions Fort Johnson in Sandusky bay, lake Erie This photograph shows one of the forts used to guard the prisoners at Johnson's Island, Lake Erie. The prison here was expected to be sufficient to accommodate the whole
July, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
governor of Indiana, but afterward came under the supervision of Colonel Hoffman, the commissary-general of prisoners. In 1863, Colonel A. A. Stevens of the Invalid Corps became commandant of the prison, and under him conditions improved. The prison at Rock Island stood on an island in the Mississippi River between the cities of Rock Island, Illinois, and Davenport, Iowa. The island itself was about three miles long and half a mile wide. The construction of the prison was ordered in July, 1863, and on August 12th, the quartermaster-general instructed the builder that the barracks for prisoners on Rock Island should be put up in the roughest and cheapest manner, mere shanties, with no fine work about them. A high fence enclosed eighty-four barracks arranged in six rows of fourteen each. The barracks were eighty-two by twenty-two by twelve feet, with a cook-house at the end of each. The ventilation was poor, and only two stoves were placed in each of the barracks. The water s
August, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
charge of this prison. The first commandant was W. S. Pierson, a business man of Sandusky, entirely without military training, who was commissioned major to command a battalion of prison guards raised for the purpose. He was later succeeded by Colonel Charles W. Hill, who commanded to the end. The number of Confederate prisoners soon became so large that other prisons were necessary, and during 1862 it was determined to restrict this prison to officers. The number so confined after August, 1863, ranged from about seventeen hundred to about three thousand two hundred and fifty, with an average of about two thousand five hundred. On the whole, conditions here were good, except that sanitation was neglected. Camp Morton, at Indianapolis, was originally the State Three commandants of Federal prisons Above are the officers in charge of three Federal prisons, the first two of which were a terror to the captured Confederates. Students of physiognomy will be interested in
August 1st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
nes and staff at City Point, Md. Brigadier-General James Barnes was in command of the district of St. Mary's, with headquarters at Point Lookout, Md., during the latter part of the war. Here the largest prison of the North was established August 1, 1863, on the low peninsula where the Potomac joins the Chesapeake Bay. No barracks were erected within the enclosure; tents were used instead. There was at all times a sufficiency of these for shelter, though at times nearly twenty thousand Conf65 an average death-rate of five per cent. a month. The next class, that in which tents were used for shelter, includes but two prisons, City Point in Maryland, and Belle Isle, in the James River, near Richmond. The former was established August 1, 1863, on a low peninsula where the Potomac joins the Chesapeake Bay. No barracks were erected, but tents were used instead. There seems at all times to have been a sufficiency of these for shelter, though they were sometimes crowded. The prison
November 18th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
h century of allowing sewage to flow through an open ditch. The guard at the gate—Camp Morton Blankets of the prisoners, Camp Morton Primitive drainage at Camp Morton water was of course abundant, though soap was lacking, and at first rations were sufficient to preserve the strength of the prisoners. During the summer of 1863 conditions were endurable, but as larger numbers were sent thither, food became scarcer, and as the weather grew colder, much suffering ensued. On November 18, 1863, according to the report of the Confederate inspector, there were sixty-three hundred in confinement, though the encampment had been intended for about three thousand, and tents for only that number had been provided. An effort to provide more was made, but tents to shelter all the prisoners were never furnished. Many prisoners lay on the damp ground without protection of any sort and there was much suffering during the winter. Little seems to have been done to better conditions e
December, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
ur barracks arranged in six rows of fourteen each. The barracks were eighty-two by twenty-two by twelve feet, with a cook-house at the end of each. The ventilation was poor, and only two stoves were placed in each of the barracks. The water supply was partly secured from an artesian well and partly from the river by means of a steam-pump, which frequently gave out for days at a time. Though the prison was not quite completed, over five thousand prisoners were sent during the month of December, 1863, and from that time on the prison usually contained from five thousand to eight thousand prisoners until the end of the war. The old capitol prison At the outset of the war, the only tenant of the Old Capitol--where once the United States Congress had been housed — was an humble German, who managed to subsist himself and his family as a cobbler. Six months later the place was full of military offenders, prisoners of state, and captured Confederates, and the guards allowed no o
it, Colonel Rose and his companions escaped, in 1864, by tunneling from the basement floor under thery-general of prisoners shows for the winter of 1864– 65 an average death-rate of five per cent. a morgia, was chosen. Here was constructed in 1863-64 the structure which acquired notoriety equal to his life he was never free from pain. Early in 1864, he was ordered to report at Andersonville, whet evening roll-call for dinner in the winter of 1864. The sergeants in front of the long line of prlanned by General Winder early in the summer of 1864, after he had seen that the number of prisonersted through 1863. During the early months of 1864, the capacity of the prison began to be reacheded during the numerous sorties of the winter of 1864-65. On account of the continual bombardment onto have been, during 1863 and the early part of 1864, comparatively few hardships. The prisoners buncerts were given frequently. In the spring of 1864, many of the inmates planted gardens, but about[2 more...]
January 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.3
rst commanded by Major W. S. Pierson, and was then under charge of Colonel Charles W. Hill. After the first year of its existence it was occupied exclusively as an officers' prison. Sometimes more than three thousand were confined here at the same time. The average was about two thousand five hundred. Conditions in this prison were generally good, although the prisoners from the Gulf States suffered intensely from the cold winds from Lake Erie. Some of them froze on the terrible New Year's Day of 1864. here were unsatisfactory, partly because of a feud between the surgeon and the commandant. The sick-rate was high. The barracks could accommodate less than half the prisoners sent here and tents were used by the remainder well on into the winter, though the weather became intensely cold. On December 4, 1864, the inspecting officer reports that both meat and flour were bad and that 1166 of the prisoners had not even one blanket. The cold winds seemed especially severe upon the
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...