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A. T. Burnley (search for this): chapter 11
asionally. Colonel Samuel M. Williams wrote him, when his fortunes were lowest, to draw on his bank at Galveston according to his necessities. Hancock, Preston, Burnley, and some others, retained their interest, and manifested it as occasion offered. The letters appended present a fair record of his plantation life and current oroud sensibility, did not propose that he should employ-it, but only that he would indicate for their guidance in what direction his wishes inclined. Hancock and Burnley, who were intimate personal friends of the President, were especially zealous. General Johnston, however, looked at the matter in an unexpected light, as will bept to conceal it as they may, a new and great party has arisen, which, like the rod of Aaron, has swallowed up all the others. A. S. Johnston. Dear General: Burnley informed me he had seen you; and showed me a letter the day he started for Washington, that he had just received from you, giving him the reasons why you could re
Washington (search for this): chapter 11
y ought to have despised rather than feared them. The writer, having been selected by his comrades as the orator in a college celebration of the birthday of Washington, received the following letter of encouragement from his father. There are in it some old-fashioned lessons of patriotism that will bear revival: Brazoria Cou for the 22d of February. It is said to be a difficult theme, on account of the immense number of speeches that have been made in commemoration of the birth of Washington; that all has been said that can be; that the subject is trite. The same might be said of all the most sublime virtues; of whatever is great, good, or beautiful; of fortitude, courage, patriotism; but it would be no more true than the remark with regard to the birthday of Washington. Do we not see that everything in Nature, in every new light in which it is viewed, presents new beauties? Every position gives a different light, and, as these positions are infinite, there cannot be any
th of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. illustrationegins to lose hope and health. his fortitude and magnanimity. General Taylor's nomination and election. movements of General Johnston's fricame before General Johnston for decision. When he had gone to General Taylor's assistance in May, he had promised his wife, who strongly oppohnston reviewed the campaign, explaining the reasons that made General Taylor's strategy the best under the circumstances, and confidently predicted his success. He had faith in Taylor's military capacity and soldierly qualities. Though cut off from a participation in the excito rarely indulged in personal criticism that his judgment as to General Taylor will not be found the least interesting part of his letters. H
Thomas C. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 11
ou what you preferred. However, the thing is now settled. Joe Taylor is now here, and tells me you will shortly be offered the place of paymaster in the army. . ... G. Hancock. Mr. A. T. Burnley was in General Taylor's confidence, and had been selected by him as one of the proprietors of the Administration organ. He wrote to General Johnston, on the 21st of May: General Taylor intended to offer you the marshalship of Texas. I told him you would not have it. He said then, if Reynolds resigned, he intended to offer you the collectorship of Galveston. I told him you would not have it. Then, said he, I shall offer him a paymaster's place in the army. Not knowing your views as to that place, I replied, I expected you would take it; because I thought it was a good office, and wanted it offered to you. I have since ascertained that it is worth about $3,000 per annum, and is permanent. In thus exchanging the life of the plantation for military service again, General John
ible citizen believes that less than 50,000 men ought to invade by way of Vera Cruz. With a less number the operations will be tardy and expensive. Your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. While the writer is aware that on some accounts a summary of incidents and opinions is preferable to the method by which a man's life is exhibited in his letters, yet there are also cogent reasons why in this case as much as possible of the record should be presented in General Johnston's own language. Drusus wished so to live that all his actions might be open to the eyes of all men. The subject of this memoir did so live that all the world might share his thoughts with his bosom friends. He was eminently sincere, so that the unconscious autobiography set down in his correspondence has a value above confessions written for the public eye. Though frank where frankness was proper, he had a certain delicacy of feeling and a proud reserve that prevented him from laying bare his private griefs. His
William Preston (search for this): chapter 11
nions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. isoldier's estimate of another, whom he had known under trying and widely varying circumstances: August 3, 1847. Dear Preston: . . . I will effect all or more than I expected in coming here, without encountering the dangers from the climate, withliams wrote him, when his fortunes were lowest, to draw on his bank at Galveston according to his necessities. Hancock, Preston, Burnley, and some others, retained their interest, and manifested it as occasion offered. The letters appended presentature of his conclusions will probably give them a certain value to a large class of readers. In a letter to Colonel William Preston, who had kindly interested himself in the education of General Johnston's children, he says: Your letter in
My memory now recalls the expression of the most vigorous thoughts connected with military operations, and I am convinced that he then possessed all the high powers of mind which he has lately displayed; that his capacity is no sudden endowment; that the great strategetic problems solved by him have often undergone the severest scrutiny of close investigation. These things are true of all minds which are accounted great on any subject. The vast conceptions of Hannibal, Caesar, Napoleon, Newton, Cicero, Homer, Angelo, Wren, Davy, etc., following the analogies of Nature, were embodiments which were developed by the active and toilsome labors of the mind. Hence the confidence, energy, and readiness, when the emergency arises. They are no sudden inspirations. We tread with rapidity and confidence the path we have often traveled over, all others with tardy doubtfulness. We hear nothing of the progress of the war. There is too much to be done with too little means. An acknowledg
en endowment; that the great strategetic problems solved by him have often undergone the severest scrutiny of close investigation. These things are true of all minds which are accounted great on any subject. The vast conceptions of Hannibal, Caesar, Napoleon, Newton, Cicero, Homer, Angelo, Wren, Davy, etc., following the analogies of Nature, were embodiments which were developed by the active and toilsome labors of the mind. Hence the confidence, energy, and readiness, when the emergency a much more insane would he be who would risk the loss of all his physical powers for a less object, or for any object! Mind and matter are dependent upon each other for effective action; if one is sick or debilitated, the other will sympathize. Caesar with the ague whines like a sick girl. An effective mind can spare nothing from the physical organization-not even its shadow. Cultivate the mind; but with the same sedulous care cultivate the body. Learn if you can; but learn nothing at the r
Edward Hobbs (search for this): chapter 11
ments of their education, separated his elder children from him. In expressing this feeling to his daughter, in 1848, he says: It is a great disappointment to me; but we have learned to repine at nothing, believing that there is a Power that orders all things for the best-that even those things that are seemingly to our finite mental vision a chastisement are ultimately for some good beyond our ken. In a letter dated June 10, 1849, replying to some good-humored reproaches from Mr. Edward Hobbs for not writing to him, General Johnston says: The life of seclusion and obscurity in which I have lived accounts for your not having heard from me. On my return from Mexico after the campaign of Monterey, I found that all the proceeds of the Louisville property would scarcely suffice for the education of Will and his sister, and that it was necessary to go to work at once with small means for the support of my family. It was a question of bread. I immediately carried my resolu
Mann Butler (search for this): chapter 11
her than I should return. I therefore yielded up all the hopes and aspirations of a soldier, and with them has vanished all regret. I made no effort to obtain a post in the army, nor did I request any friend to do it; nor would I, after that, have accepted any offer. I have had the firmness to resist the most powerful impulse of Nature and education; and, no doubt, for the best, at least so far as my family is concerned. You will oblige me by presenting my most friendly regards to General Butler. His soldierly and gallant bearing commanded the admiration of every one, and I would be glad to know that he will lead an effective force to the aid of Scott; for, truly, the situation of our army is precarious. The force to have accomplished the work given to him, promptly and economically both with regard to blood and treasure, should not have been less than 50,000 men. With that amount of force he could have controlled the resources of the country for the support of his army, and s
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