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Edgar M. Gregory (search for this): chapter 6
he right, with three battalion lines in close order, while Gregory at first was held massed in my rear. General Mackenzie's eep a sharp lookout for your own right. Accordingly I had Gregory throw out a small battalion as skirmishers and flankers, ant line, but now hastened over to the right, where I found Gregory earnestly carrying out my instructions to guard that flanke, that had been picketing the White Oak Road, and so kept Gregory on the alert. The influence of the sharp skirmish fire onled my brigade out of the woods by the left flank, telling Gregory to follow; and, sending to Bartlett to let him know what Ist fell on my stalwart 185th New York, Colonel Sniper; but Gregory His regiments were the 187th, 188th, and 189th New York in by my own brigade; and four hundred and seventy men by Gregory's. It is not impossible that some of these prisoners turne Road. I helped him pick up a lot of stragglers and asked Gregory to give him the 188th New York for assistance. Meanwhi
d to draw the men towards it; but I used all my efforts to shorten step on the pivot and press the wheeling flank, in order to be ready for the swing to the left. Still, the firing ahead kept me dubious. It might mean Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry making a demonstration there; but from the persistence of it was more likely to mean infantry reinforcements sent the enemy from the Claiborne entrenchments where we had left them the day before. It was afterwards seen how near it came to being that. Wise, Gracie, and Hunton's Brigades had been ordered out of the Claiborne entrenchments that afternoon to attack the right flank of the Fifth Corps; but being obliged to take a roundabout way and getting entangled among the streams and marshes north of the White Oak Road, they were too late to reach the scene of action until all was over.-Records, Warren Court, Lee's testimony, p. 473; McGowan's, p. 651; Hunton's, p. 626. It was, in fact, Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, commanded now by the experience
Lewis Grant (search for this): chapter 6
900; also of General Sheridan, p. 93; and General Grant, p. 0028. General Grant afterwards staay's damage. This was in a despatch sent by Grant to Sheridan at about 2 P. M. on the 31st of Marren Court, p. 1313. He told me also that Grant had given Sheridan authority to remove Warren and will at once report for orders to Lieutenant-General Grant, commanding Armies of the United Statom dire experience, and, for which we had also Grant's quite recent sanction, The order to entrensified by his staff officers, and adopted by Grant without feeling necessity of further investiganed on more accounts than one to find that General Grant in his notice of our action that afternoontoo implicitly to those whom he liked. If General Grant was to honor us by his notice at all, we stifying an arbitrary act of authority. If General Grant could have looked into the case, he would ing sense of his approaching end compelled General Grant to finish his book in haste. However pain[8 more...]
the whole Fifth Corps and our cavalry also would whirl in, and catch the enemy in a maelstrom of destruction? What did happen, as it was, would have happened quicker had Ayres fared harder. Or suppose Ayres was not so fortunately struck from the extended outwork, and had marched past the left of the enemy's entrenched line two hundred and fifty yards away, as he says he was doing. Testimony, Warren Court Records, p. 255. Major Benyaurd, Corps of Engineers, says Ayres' left passed the Bass house to our right of it. Warren Court Records, p. 160. Being on Griffin's left, he must have struck the left flank of the return, and soon the rear of the enemy's main line on the White Oak Road. Griffin would then have been in immediate connection and would have swung with him. It would have taken a little longer; but the enemy would have been enveloped all the same. Sheridan's brilliant tactics would have been triumphant. Only Warren would have shared the glory. Another consideratio
e Oak Road, by a wide detour reaching almost to Hatcher's Run, until he had crossed the Ford Road, quite in rear of the breaking lines which Ransom and Wallace and Wood were trying to hold together. I To my grief over the costs of this struggle was added now another, when, borne past me on the right, came the form of Colonel Faour hands on it. There was a queer parliament of religions just then and there, at this Five Forks focus. And it came in this wise. As Ransom and Wallace and Wood's reinforced but wasting lines had fallen back before us along the north and east side of their works, our cavalry kept up sharp attacks upon their right across th they did arrive most timely, and on purpose to meet a cross-fire, which they did not back out of. Away from the fighting ? Let Ayres, and Ransom, and Wallace, and Wood, and Sheridan answer. Found ? By whom? Brought back ? By what? They were found at the angle, and brought themselves there ahead of the finders. Saul, the seek
before them. I have only time to say to Ayres, Gwyn is in on the right ; for Sheridan takes him in ord with Ayres now, and to explain my taking up Gwyn so sharply. He is not in the mood to blame me n, and put them in, without sending any word to Gwyn on his right. I could see how it was. Losing connection, Gwyn was at a loss what to do, and in the brief time Ayres was routing the enemy who had attacked him, I had come upon Gwyn and had put him in, really ahead of the main line of Ayres, who shis reference, I will mention that Brevet Brigadier-General Gwyn was colonel of the I 8th Pennsylva being convened, charges were preferred against Gwyn by some who did not understand the facts of thind sent them back with the endorsement that General Gwyn had done his best under peculiarly perplexind Ayres would seem to be assistance enough for Gwyn in handling his little skirmish line. But Sherade on Ayres' right, and of the 4th Delaware on Gwyn's right, who say that Griffin's troops were on [1 more...]
with Griffin on the left of my front line, but now hastened over to the right, where I found Gregory earnestly carrying out my instructions to guard that flank. I caught a glimpse of some cavalry in the woods on our right, which I judged to be Roberts' North Carolina Brigade, that had been picketing the White Oak Road, and so kept Gregory on the alert. The influence of the sharp skirmish fire on Crawford's right tended to draw the men towards it; but I used all my efforts to shorten step onawford and Ayres. It was now apparent that the road-crossing Crawford had struck was not at the angle of the enemy's entrenched line, but at least a gunshot to the east of this,--in fact it was a thousand yards away. Mackenzie had crowded off Roberts' cavalry towards its right near Burgess' Mill,--this cavalry not being under Fitzhugh Lee or Munford but taking orders directly from the infantry general R. H. Anderson. My orders were in general to follow Crawford. I had managed, however,
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 6
of us in the desperate race. Sheridan cutting the enemy's communications and rolling up their scattering fugitives would have shown his great qualities, and won conspicuous, though not supreme honors. Warren would have shared the glories of his corps. Humphreys and Wright with their veterans of the Second and Sixth, whose superb action compelled the first flag of truce contemplating Lee's surrender, would not have stood idly around the headquarters' flag of the Army of the Potomac, with Longstreet's right wing brought to bay before them, waiting till Lee's final answer to Grant should come through Sheridan to the Fifth Corps front, where Ord, of the Army of the James, commanded. And Meade, the high-born gentleman and high-born soldier, would have been spared the slight of being held back with the main body of his army, while the laurels were bestowed by chance or choice, which had been so fairly won by that old army in long years of heroic patience in well-doing and suffering;--mig
roops struck them, the claimants of the capture should be content to rank their merits in the order of their coming. There were, however, some guns farther up the Ford Road,--whether those at first under Ransom on the refused flank, or those hurried from Pegram's command on the White Oak Road to the support of the breaking lines vainly essaying to cover the Ford Road. Of the capture of these there is no doubt. These Major West Funk-a strange misnomer, but a better name in German than in English, showing there is some sparkle in his blood-actually took, by personal touch, --both ways. First dodging behind trees before their canister, then shooting down the horses and mules attached to the limbers, as well as the gunners who stood by them, his two little regiments made a rush for the battery, overwhelmed it, unmanned it, and then swept on, leaving the guns behind them, making no fuss about it, and so very likely to get no credit for it. This little episode, however, was not unobser
position, and at a delayed hour. It was successful, owing to the character of the troops, and the skill and vigor of the commander. Appomattox was a glorious result of strong pushing and hard marching. But both could have been forestalled, and all that fighting, together with that at Sailor's Creek, High Bridge, and Farmville have been concentrated in one grand assault, of which the sharp-edged line along the White Oak Road would have been one blade of the shears, and Ord and Wright and Parke on the main line the other, and the hard and costly ten days chase and struggle would have been spared so many noble men. Lee would not have got a day's start of us in the desperate race. Sheridan cutting the enemy's communications and rolling up their scattering fugitives would have shown his great qualities, and won conspicuous, though not supreme honors. Warren would have shared the glories of his corps. Humphreys and Wright with their veterans of the Second and Sixth, whose superb act
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