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Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 6
iring ahead kept me dubious. It might mean Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry making a demonstration there; but651; Hunton's, p. 626. It was, in fact, Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, commanded now by the experienced the force we had to contend with that day. Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, dismounted, now commanded by Mun gained the Ford Road at about 6 P. M., but Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser not at all. Pickett narrowly escgh himself alert, was not kept informed by Fitzhugh Lee or Pickett of the movements of the Fifth Corps in relation to Five Forks, and that Lee was led by a word from Pickett to suppose that FitzhughFitzhugh Lee's and Rosser's cavalry were both close in support of Pickett's left flank at Five Forks. Re at no time on the field. We know now that General Lee afterwards wrote General Wade Hampton in thof this, as we might have done before him. Only Lee had now got a day's start of us, the head of hit wing brought to bay before them, waiting till Lee's final answer to Grant should come through She[9 more...]
John Stanton (search for this): chapter 6
t time this regiment had now lost in battle colonel, major, and adjutant, and all we could secure for the rest of the service, that great regiment of fourteen companies, was a major's rank. This, indeed, was worthily bestowed. It came to Captain John Stanton, who after the fall of Sickel and MacEuen had acted as a field officer with fidelity and honor, and had distinguished himself in the struggle for the flag snatched by Glenn with more than mortal energy and at mortal cost. By this timeestified to by commanding officers of the Maryland Brigade on Ayres' right, and of the 4th Delaware on Gwyn's right, who say that Griffin's troops were on the flank and rear of the rebel line at the angle before they attacked it in front. Colonel Stanton, who succeeded Bowerman in command of Ayres' Second Brigade, says the enemy were struck on their left and rear and forced in confusion on his front at the angle. Captain Buckingham, commanding the 4th Delaware, the extreme right of Ayres' D
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 6
the grievance for General Warren. He was immediately assigned to another command; but even if Grant had restored him to the Fifth Corps, this would not wipe out that record, which stood against hit friend and chief witness-called by the applicant, but necessarily for the respondent — was General Grant, ex-President of the United States, who still carried an immense prestige and influence. Thmac, with Longstreet's right wing brought to bay before them, waiting till Lee's final answer to Grant should come through Sheridan to the Fifth Corps front, where Ord, of the Army of the James, commcorps commander on the Peninsula, and heir apparent to the command of the army, and Warren, whom Grant says he had looked upon for commander of the army in case anything should take from the field the sterling Meade. Grant's Memoirs, vol. II., p. 216. Who from such beginning could have foretold the end! And Meade,--he, too, went from the Fifth Corps to the command of the army, and found the
s,and went for that purpose to the point where Warren had had his headquarters the night before. Wat Grant had given Sheridan authority to remove Warren from command of the corps, when he found occasurned on. For no despatch of Dana's concerning Warren compares in severity with Dana's to the Secretand across the fields to resist the advance of Warren with Crawford. We, too, were pressing hard patience was exhausted. By G-, sir, tell General Warren he wasn't in the fight! Colonel Locke wasd equal to the demands of the situation. Poor Warren, how he will suffer for this! they said with We could not tell. It was not wholly because Warren had gone, although in the sundering of old tieir; that they even broke and ran; and that General Warren did not exert himself to correct the confu broken, to be on the alert to see and to act. Warren should hold him responsible for that. And if the Sydnor fields. Things being as they were, Warren got his corps into the fight as quickly and e[75 more...]
for assistance. Meanwhile Warren, searching for Crawford, had come upon his First Brigade, Kellogg's, and had faced it southerly towards the White Oak Road, as a guide for a new point of directse troops to bring them in on the line. Thereupon one of Sheridan's staff officers came across Kellogg standing there, and naturally ordered him to go forward into the fight. Kellogg questioned hisKellogg questioned his authority, and warm words took the place of other action, till at length Kellogg concluded it best to obey Sheridan's representative, and moved promptly forward, striking somewhere beyond the left oKellogg concluded it best to obey Sheridan's representative, and moved promptly forward, striking somewhere beyond the left of the enemy's refused new flank. It seems also that Crawford's Third Brigade, Coulter's, which was in his rear line, had anticipated orders or got Warren's, and moved by the shortest line in the dirved him from perdition. He undertook the duties of staff officer for Crawford. He got hold of Kellogg's Brigade and posted it as a marker in the midst of the Sydnor woods, while he went off to find
Charles Griffin (search for this): chapter 6
k. Nevertheless, just as we were moving, General Griffin cautioned me: Don't be too sure about Macrd the cavalry,--quite a way from any support Griffin's division could give him. Ill at ease ionel of the I 8th Pennsylvania Volunteers, in Griffin's Division, and had been assigned to command that. Soon thereafter Sheridan came upon General Griffin, and, without preface or index, told the ooner they got there, the safer for them. Griffin came down now from the right, dashed ahead of I could not be sorry for the corps, nor that Griffin was in command of it-he had the confidence of II., page 443), uses the following language: Griffin's Division, in backing to get out of the way he 4th Delaware on Gwyn's right, who say that Griffin's troops were on the flank and rear of the ren his other divisions to support Ayres — that Griffin's troops quite as much as Ayres' took part ine for Griffin. It would have been better (as Griffin and Ayres said later in the day) to put Griff[54 more...]
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 6
gh Lee's and Rosser's cavalry were both close in support of Pickett's left flank at Five Forks. Rebellion Records, serial 95, p. 1264. This was not the truth. Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry under Munford was over a thousand yards east of Pickett's left at the beginning and during the day was pressed around his rear so as to reach his troops after their lines had all been broken. And as for Rosser's cavalry they were at no time on the field. We know now that General Lee afterwards wrote General Wade Hampton in these words: Had you been at Five Forks with your cavalry the disaster would not have befallen my army. Nor does it appear that General Anderson, commanding General Lee's reserves in this quarter, knew anything of the pressing need of them at Five Forks until all was over. So there are some other generals beside Warren who helped Sheridan to his fame at Five Forks. So much for the tactics of that battle. In spite of errors it was a great victory. It was Sheridan's battle
ments where we had left them the day before. It was afterwards seen how near it came to being that. Wise, Gracie, and Hunton's Brigades had been ordered out of the Claiborne entrenchments that afternoon to attack the right flank of the Fifth Corp late to reach the scene of action until all was over.-Records, Warren Court, Lee's testimony, p. 473; McGowan's, p. 651; Hunton's, p. 626. It was, in fact, Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, commanded now by the experienced and able Munford who had dismounhe rear of the lines on the White Oak Road. Would it not have been awkward to have these five thousand fresh men General Hunton, before the Warren Court, placed the numbers of these three brigades, when they attacked us the day before, first at Claiborne Road after they were driven in on the afternoon of March 31st was by no means strongly held. Testimony of General Hunton, Warren Court Records, p. 629. Indeed, the very first thing we did the next morning after Five Forks was to move back
s some curious details as to a shad dinner on the north side of Hatcher's Run. Pickett returned to the field only after we had all gained the Ford Road at about 6 P. M., but Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser not at all. Pickett narrowly escaped the shots of our men as he attempted to pass them to reach his broken lines towards the White Obert E. Lee, although himself alert, was not kept informed by Fitzhugh Lee or Pickett of the movements of the Fifth Corps in relation to Five Forks, and that Lee was led by a word from Pickett to suppose that Fitzhugh Lee's and Rosser's cavalry were both close in support of Pickett's left flank at Five Forks. Rebellion RecoPickett's left flank at Five Forks. Rebellion Records, serial 95, p. 1264. This was not the truth. Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry under Munford was over a thousand yards east of Pickett's left at the beginning and during tPickett's left at the beginning and during the day was pressed around his rear so as to reach his troops after their lines had all been broken. And as for Rosser's cavalry they were at no time on the field.
Phil Sheridan (search for this): chapter 6
preciate and thank you all. And this is Phil Sheridan! A new view of him, surely, and amazing. ing. He put his personality into it; just as Sheridan would do and did in this very fight. It was ore simple. Taking its rise and keynote from Sheridan's report, somewhat intensified by his staff o The whole trouble and the disturbance of Sheridan's preconceived image of the battle arose fromf the conditions in his front of attack. But Sheridan saw and approved the diagram; and if anybody Warren Court Records, p. 267 and p. 1080. General Sheridan himself admits this. Testimony, Recordd critical point he was not present where General Sheridan wanted him is another matter, which does some other generals beside Warren who helped Sheridan to his fame at Five Forks. So much for thght the catastrophe. No one can doubt General Sheridan's right to remove Warren; but whether he court to bring in a verdict of censure on General Sheridan, or anything that would amount to that. [30 more...]
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