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n of the Second Corps was sent by General Hancock to assist in checking the advance of the enemy, but after a severe struggle, in which Caldwell lost one-half of his command, the enemy enveloped his right and forced him back. The division of General Ayres was then struck on the right and rear, but with great courage it fought its way back through the enemy to its original line. General Humphreys, with his division, held the right of the line of the Third Corps. Although severely pressed by tshot under him. Finally, about sunset, a counter charge was made by our troops, in which the remnants of Humphrey's Division joined, and had the satisfaction of bringing back the guns they had previously lost. The division of Regulars, under General Ayres, led the assault on the right of the Fifth Corps, and pressed the enemy on the centre, but on the left they were outflanked and driven back. General Sykes at once ordered forward the Pennsylvania Reserves, who, led by General Crawford, made
Robert Mitchell (search for this): chapter 16
nded and captured inside of our batteries. No one could have witnessed the conduct of the Southern troops, on this occasion, without a feeling of admiration, mingled with regret that such heroic courage and brave determination had not been displayed in a better cause. On our side the loss was very heavy, General Hancock and General Gibbon being among the wounded. When General Meade heard that Hancock, who had rendered conspicuous service throughout the battle, was wounded, he said to General Mitchell, of Hancock's staff, who had brought him the news: Say to General Hancock that I thank him in my own name, and I thank him in the name of the country, for all he has done. As soon as the assault was repulsed, General Meade went to the left of our lines and ordered Crawford's Division, the Pennsylvania Reserves, to advance. This division met a portion of Hood's command and attacked them, capturing many prisoners and seven thousand stand of arms. By this action Crawford regained poss
Alexander Williams (search for this): chapter 16
m foremost in all public works, and made his name a household wold in all your homes. During the dark days of our civil war, I happened to be in Washington. He telegraphed me to come and celebrate Easter in his camp, with the Holy Communion. It was a strange place for Easter flowers and Easter songs, and the story of the Resurrection, but I do not recall a sweeter service, nor one more redolent of the peace of heaven. Of the bronzed veterans who knelt beside the Lord's table, some, like Williams and Meade, are sleeping with the dead; others are scattered far, and busy in life's work. That day I knew that we had in our camp centurions who feared God and prayed always. The world loves to tell other stories of public men; and, perhaps, no eye but God's sees the record of the conflict of human souls in the battle of life. Death came suddenly, without the sound of a footfall; there were a few days when friends waited on medical skill, but his heart was in the country whither he was g
at this time consisted of the First Corps, General Reynolds; Second, General Hancock; Third, General Sickles; Fifth, General Sykes (who succeeded General Meade); Sixth, General Sedgwick; Eleventh, General Howard, and Twelfth, General Slocum; the caa few men whom he had collected together. General Meade sent several staff officers to urge forward the column under General Sykes, which was coming up with all possible speed, and which fortunately soon arrived. General Sykes at once threw a strGeneral Sykes at once threw a strong force upon Round Top, and succeeded in holding it against the enemy's assaults, after a fearful struggle. In the meantime, the attack upon General Sickles was continued with great fury, and after a stubborn and gallant resistance, during whiright of the Fifth Corps, and pressed the enemy on the centre, but on the left they were outflanked and driven back. General Sykes at once ordered forward the Pennsylvania Reserves, who, led by General Crawford, made a gallant charge, and, after a
usket range of our infantry. Here they were met by a terrible volley from Hays' and Gibbon's divisions, of the Second Corps. Pettigrew's command, composed of raw troops, gave way, and many of them were made prisoners; but Pickett's men, still undaunted, pressed on, and captured some of the intrenchments on our centre, crowding back the advanced portion of Webb's Brigade, which was soon rallied by the personal efforts of its commander. General Meade had ordered up Doubleday's Division and Stannard's Brigade of the First Corps, and, at this critical moment, General Hancock advanced, and Pickett's brave men were driven back with terrible loss. All their brigade commanders had fallen-one of them, General Armistead, being wounded and captured inside of our batteries. No one could have witnessed the conduct of the Southern troops, on this occasion, without a feeling of admiration, mingled with regret that such heroic courage and brave determination had not been displayed in a better cau
ll-sustained assault on our lines, advancing steadily, under a heavy artillery fire from the guns Lee thought he had silenced, to within musket range of our infantry. Here they were met by a terrible volley from Hays' and Gibbon's divisions, of the Second Corps. Pettigrew's command, composed of raw troops, gave way, and many of them were made prisoners; but Pickett's men, still undaunted, pressed on, and captured some of the intrenchments on our centre, crowding back the advanced portion of Webb's Brigade, which was soon rallied by the personal efforts of its commander. General Meade had ordered up Doubleday's Division and Stannard's Brigade of the First Corps, and, at this critical moment, General Hancock advanced, and Pickett's brave men were driven back with terrible loss. All their brigade commanders had fallen-one of them, General Armistead, being wounded and captured inside of our batteries. No one could have witnessed the conduct of the Southern troops, on this occasion, wi
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 16
the assault on the right of the Fifth Corps, and pressed the enemy on the centre, but on the left they were outflanked and driven back. General Sykes at once ordered forward the Pennsylvania Reserves, who, led by General Crawford, made a gallant charge, and, after a sharp contest, the enemy retired. This ended the action on our left, but at eight P. M. it was suddenly renewed on our right by General Ewell, who made a powerful attack on our lines with the divisions of General Early and General Johnson, the former at Cemetery Hill and the latter at Culp's Hill. General Howard, who held the ground at Cemetery Hill, succeeded in repulsing the enemy, with the assistance of Carroll's Brigade of the Second Corps, which had been sent to his support by General Hancock. At Culp's Hill, the extreme right was held by only one brigade of the Twelfth Corps, the remainder of that corps not having yet returned from the left. This brigade, commanded by General Greene, resisted the assault with gr
J. R. Sypher (search for this): chapter 16
sing of the Rapidan, on May 5th, to the unsuccessful assault on the enemy's works at Petersburg, June 18th, a period of about six weeks, the Army of the Potomac lost not less than seventy thousand men. In the battles between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia, in no case was a direct assault upon an intrenched position successful. There is evidence that the enemy were anxious to be attacked at Williamsport. In the History of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, by Mr. J. R. Sypher, a letter is quoted from the Rev. Dr. Falk, who was in the enemy's lines at that place. Dr. Falk says: I was at the College of St. James, to which, on account of its commanding position, very many officers of the highest rank came to reconnoitre Meade's lines. From the conversation of these officers among themselves, and with us, it was evident that they most ardently desired to be attacked. Now we have Meade where we want him. If he attacks us here, we will pay him back for Get
ers; but Pickett's men, still undaunted, pressed on, and captured some of the intrenchments on our centre, crowding back the advanced portion of Webb's Brigade, which was soon rallied by the personal efforts of its commander. General Meade had ordered up Doubleday's Division and Stannard's Brigade of the First Corps, and, at this critical moment, General Hancock advanced, and Pickett's brave men were driven back with terrible loss. All their brigade commanders had fallen-one of them, General Armistead, being wounded and captured inside of our batteries. No one could have witnessed the conduct of the Southern troops, on this occasion, without a feeling of admiration, mingled with regret that such heroic courage and brave determination had not been displayed in a better cause. On our side the loss was very heavy, General Hancock and General Gibbon being among the wounded. When General Meade heard that Hancock, who had rendered conspicuous service throughout the battle, was wounded,
ed by General Greene, resisted the assault with great firmness, and, aided by Wadsworth's Division of the First Corps, finally succeeded in repulsing the enemy, who, however, advanced and occupied the breastworks on our furthest right, vacated by Geary's Division of the Twelfth Corps, which position they held during the night. Thus ended, at ten P. M., the second day of the battle. Both armies had fought with a desperation which proved that they realized the tremendous issues which hung upover to the left, to its former position, and a terrible struggle took place for the possession of the ground which had been occupied by General Ewell the night before. General Lee had hoped, by holding this ground, to turn our position, but General Geary, with his division, assisted by troops from the Sixth Corps, attacked the enemy, and, after a severe engagement, which lasted five hours, he drove them from our lines with heavy loss. This action terminated at ten A. M., and was followed by
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