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Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
he marched to the Potomac, at Senecca falls, where, as the fording was deep, the caissons were emptied and the bombshells carried over by cavalrymen in their hands. After capturing a canalboat laden with commissary stores, Stuart proceeded to Rockville, in the direction of Washington City. Here a large Union flag was flying, which he would not allow his men to pull down, saying he was not fighting the flag, but his real motive was that he wanted it as a decoy. From Rockville several regimenRockville several regiments were sent in the direction of Washington, who captured the long wagon-train so often spoken of in connection with this campaign. It was drawn by more than an hundred mules, and seemed a rich prize; but it proved in the end a serious disadvantage, for it retarded the movements of the command, beside requiring a large detail of men. This raid produced great consternation among the enemy, and drew from Meade's army all his available cavalry to oppose it. But for this encumbrance Stuart could t
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
es Keith, now well known as one of the ablest and most distinguished judges in Virginia, and William H. Payne, a leading member of the Virginia bar, who, during the was the people called it, gave an immense impulse to the secession sentiment of Virginia, and when South Carolina seceded and coercion was talked of, the captain of thhe time of the formation of the Southern Republic, at Montgomery, fearing that Virginia would not take part in the movement, the captain of the Black Horse relinquishe 16th of April, 1861, the day before the Ordinance of Secession was passed by Virginia, orders were received by Lieutenant Randolph, commanding the Black Horse Cavalrmy at Harper's Ferry, where it lay gathering strength for another invasion of Virginia. But Jackson would not agree to Stuart's proposal. He said: I know the, Blac the Southern Confederacy received its death wound. Upon Meade's advance into Virginia, Lee retired to the south bank of the Rapidan, with headquarters at Orange Cou
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
r invasion of Virginia. But Jackson would not agree to Stuart's proposal. He said: I know the, Black Horse, and can employ the greater part of the command for staff duty. In this raid Stuart took with him fifteen squadrons of horse, composed of details from his regiments, one of which the writer of this commanded. The raiders crossed an obscure ford of the Potomac, above Harper's Ferry, General Wade Hampton, with a battery of horse artillery, being in the van, and camped that night at Chambersburg. The next day they passed through Emmettsburg on their return to the Potomac, and, marching all night, early the ensuing day reached White's ford of the Potomac, below Harper's Ferry, having thus made the circuit of the Federal army. But here Stuart encountered a formidable force of infantry and cavalry, stationed to oppose his passage of the river. Without hesitation, and with that undaunted courage which he showed on every battle-field, he drove the enemy before him, rapidly threw hi
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
es Army, afterward a Confederate general, at Waterloo, on the Rappahannock river, in Farquier county, Virginia, on the 18th of June, 1859, the Burnside had been moved by sea from North Carolina, and was at Fredericksburg, sent a brigade of cavalry, which embraced the Black Horse, to of roads, came into the main road from Culpepper Court-House to Fredericksburg, and turning to the right, attacked the cavalry protecting Popermy, and that he had indicated his intention of marching toward Fredericksburg. Lee again put his army in motion, and posted it on the Spottsylvania Heights, at Fredericksburg, and confronted Burnside on the opposite side of the river. The Union army again suffered defeat, and again or a dozen of the men to follow the march of the enemy toward Fredericksburg and pick up stragglers and horses. This they did for some distself. In the latter part of April the cavalry corps marched to Fredericksburg and took position on the right of the Army of Northern Virginia
Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
unty to report the enemy's movements to General Lee. During this time the command performed many brilliant exploits in its numerous encounters with the enemy, captured three hundred prisoners, and minutely reported Hooker's movements. Its services were handsomely acknowledged by General Lee and General Stuart in general orders. An incident that occurred at this time illustrates the nature of this service. General Fitz Lee, with a brigade of cavalry, had crossed the Rappahannock, at Kelly's ford, and moving down the north bank of the river, had driven the enemy's pickets to within three miles of Falmouth. At Hartwood church he captured a number of prisoners, and detailing a guard of men, whose horses were in a weak and crippled condition, ordered Lieutenant A. D. Payne to take command and conduct them to the army, crossing at the United States ford. But he informed him that he would, in all probability, fall in with a company of Confederate cavalry which had been on picket. Af
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
nd, in a night attack on a Federal camp at Harper's Ferry; James H. Childs was elected second sergeave commands and proceed, without delay, to Harper's Ferry. The object of this expedition was to capr remaining several days on picket duty at Harper's Ferry, was ordered on similar service, to Berlin London. It was while the command were at Harper's Ferry that Major Thomas J. Jackson, of the Virgipedition to Williamsport, Martinsburg, and Harper's Ferry. At the latter place he employed the pen began their work. The General remained at Harper's Ferry till a late hour of the night, disposing oompany his raid around McClellan's army at Harper's Ferry, where it lay gathering strength for anothssed an obscure ford of the Potomac, above Harper's Ferry, General Wade Hampton, with a battery of hreached White's ford of the Potomac, below Harper's Ferry, having thus made the circuit of the Federy. When McClellan crossed the river at Harper's Ferry, Lee was encamped at Winchester. Jackson
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
When the next admiring crowd was passed, and they demanded to see the great captain, this soldier was pointed out to them. When they shouted and cheered he halted, and, with the utmost complaisance, received their compliments. Jackson, of course, had galloped on as usual. When the General, turning in his saddle, saw what was going on, he was greatly amused, and the joke was repeated until the novelty wore off. The Black Horse accompanied Jackson in his expedition to Williamsport, Martinsburg, and Harper's Ferry. At the latter place he employed the pen of Lieutenant A. D. Payne to copy his order of assault to be delivered to his officers-orders which were never acted on, as the place was surrendered before the assaulting columns began their work. The General remained at Harper's Ferry till a late hour of the night, disposing of the prisoners and the material of war which he had captured. He then started, escorted by Lieutenant Payne, with a detachment of twenty of his comm
Snickersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
the movements of Lee's army in the Valley of Virginia as it was being marched for the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. At Aldie, in the county of Loudon, the Black Horse, under command of Lieutenant A. D. Payne, covered itself with glory. The Southern cavalry had been pressing the pursuit from the direction of the Blue Ridge, during the day, and had brought the enemy to a stand at a point on the Middleburg road two miles from Aldie, and at an equal distance from that place on the Snickersville road, these two roads converging at Aldie. Colonel Mumford was in advance with the Fourth Regiment, the Black Horse being the leading squadron. He halted his command, and taking with him two pieces of artillery, he ordered Lieutenant A. D. Payne to follow with his command. He posted the artillery on a prominent point in the angle formed by the two roads, and commenced firing on the enemy who were advancing in large numbers on the Snickersville turnpike. To capture the guns placed in
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
as in advance with the Fourth Regiment, the Black Horse being the leading squadron. He halted his command, and taking with him two pieces of artillery, he ordered Lieutenant A. D. Payne to follow with his command. He posted the artillery on a prominent point in the angle formed by the two roads, and commenced firing on the enemy who were advancing in large numbers on the Snickersville turnpike. To capture the guns placed in this exposed position the Federals sent forward a regiment of Massachusetts infantry. In this critical position of his guns, Colonel Munford ordered Lieutenant Payne, who had not with him more than thirty of his men, the rest being scattered as videttes, to charge the advancing column of cavalry, but never expecting, as he afterward said, to see one of them return alive. Lieutenant Payne formed his men in the turnpike in a column of fours, and down upon the enemy he rode with a loud cheer, the dust concealing the insignificant nature of his force. The regimen
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
into the Confederate service, and from that point conducted it to Manassas, where, together with a few other companies, it formed the nucleus advance of General McDowell, the Black Horse rejoined the army at Manassas. On the 4th of July, in an attempt to ambuscade a detachment of t the body-guard of General Earl Van Dorn, commanding a division at Manassas. When General Earl Van Dorn was assigned to an independent commanhe struck Pope's line of communication at Bristow Station and Manassas Junction, as Stuart had before struck it at Catlett's Station. But thrd the crossings of Broad run. He then moved down the railroad to Manassas, where he captured, in addition to several trains of cars, a larged in consequence a New Jersey brigade of infantry, stationed below Manassas, was ordered up to retake the place. Possessed with this belief, ary policy had been adopted as promptly after the first victory at Manassas, it is clear that the Confederate States would have been triumphan
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