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Virginians (search for this): chapter 24
ieutenant-generals, were assigned to the Second and Third respectively. As the senior major-general of the army, and by reason of distinguished services and ability, General Ewell was entitled to the command of the Second Corps, but there were other major-generals of rank next below Ewell whose services were such as to give them claims next after Ewell's, so that when they found themselves neglected there was no little discontent, and the fact that both the new lieutenant-generals were Virginians made the trouble more grievous. General D. H. Hill was next in rank to General Ewell. He was the hero of Bethel, Seven Pines, South Mountain, and the hardest fighter at Sharpsburg. His record was as good as that of Stonewall Jackson, but, not being a Virginian, he was not so well advertised. Afterwards, when Early, noted as the weakest general officer of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appointed lieutenant-general over those who held higher rank than he, there was a more serious feel
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 24
lizing the contest battle of Chancellorsville, Lee's brilliant achievement criticism death of Stt on foot a few weeks later, at a time when General Lee happened to be in Richmond. The informatioe, and demurred against authority less than General Lee's, but found that the order must be obeyed.res to pull away from Suffolk and return to General Lee with all speed. These came from General Lesomely begun. With a brave heart, however, General Lee was getting his ranks together, and puttinge other. My impression was, and is, that General Lee, standing under his trenches, would have benk road against the enemy's march to attack General Lee's rear. Instead, he retreated by the Telegk to his late position at Marye's Hill. So General Lee was obliged to take McLaws and Anderson froot a just criterion. After reporting to General Lee, I offered the suggestions made to Secretas. General Jackson's death suggested to General Lee a reorganization of his army into three cor[11 more...]
Julius Caesar (search for this): chapter 24
-goods factories, for want of other dye-stuffs, had long before this resorted to the use of the butternut coloring. dry-goods, and, in due form christening him Julius Caesar, took him to the platform, adjusted him to graceful position, and made him secure to the framework by strong cords. A little after sunrise Julius Caesar was dJulius Caesar was discovered by some of the Federal battery officers, who prepared for the target,--so inviting to skilful practice. The new soldier sat under the hot fire with irritating indifference until the Confederates, not able to restrain their hilarity, exposed the joke by calling for three cheers for Julius Caesar. The other side quickly rJulius Caesar. The other side quickly recognized the situation, and good-naturedly added to ours their cheers for the old hero. About the 28th day of April the Army of the Potomac, under General Hooker, took up its march for the fords of the upper Rappahannock to cross against General Lee at Fredericksburg. At the same time General Grant crossed the Mississippi bel
Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 24
ns to their final resting-place started upon its sad journey. Then officers and soldiers gathered to do last honors to their dead comrade and chieftain seemed suddenly to realize that they were to see Stonewall Jackson no more forever, and fully to measure the great misfortune that had come upon them. And as we turned away, we seemed to face a future bereft of much of its hopefulness. General Jackson's death suggested to General Lee a reorganization of his army into three corps, and R. S. Ewell and A. P. Hill, appointed lieutenant-generals, were assigned to the Second and Third respectively. As the senior major-general of the army, and by reason of distinguished services and ability, General Ewell was entitled to the command of the Second Corps, but there were other major-generals of rank next below Ewell whose services were such as to give them claims next after Ewell's, so that when they found themselves neglected there was no little discontent, and the fact that both the
Vicksburg the skilful use of interior lines the only way of equalizing the contest battle of Chancellorsville, Lee's brilliant achievement criticism death of Stonewall Jackson the resolve to march northward the Army reorganized in three Corps Ewell and A. P. Hill appointed Lieutenant Generals. Before we were fully settleupon its sad journey. Then officers and soldiers gathered to do last honors to their dead comrade and chieftain seemed suddenly to realize that they were to see Stonewall Jackson no more forever, and fully to measure the great misfortune that had come upon them. And as we turned away, we seemed to face a future bereft of much of next in rank to General Ewell. He was the hero of Bethel, Seven Pines, South Mountain, and the hardest fighter at Sharpsburg. His record was as good as that of Stonewall Jackson, but, not being a Virginian, he was not so well advertised. Afterwards, when Early, noted as the weakest general officer of the Army of Northern Virginia
George Lincoln (search for this): chapter 24
previous,--i.e., to stand behind our intrenched lines and await the return of my troops from Suffolk. Under that plan General Lee would have had time to strengthen and improve his trenches, while Hooker was intrenching at Chancellorsville. He could have held his army solid behind his lines, where his men would have done more work on the unfinished lines in a day than in months of idle camp life. General Hooker had split his army in two, and was virtually in the condition which President Lincoln afterwards so graphically described in his letter addressed to him June 5 following,--viz.: I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence and liable to be torn by dogs front and rear, without a fair chance to gore one way or to kick the other. My impression was, and is, that General Lee, standing under his trenches, would have been stronger against Hooker than he was in December against Burnside, and that he would have grown stronge
Lafayette McLaws (search for this): chapter 24
illery battalions, to the south side near Petersburg, to be in position to meet the latter move, leaving the divisions of McLaws and R. H. Anderson to finish the work on the lines of defence. After passing to the south side of James River, assignve warfare he was perfect. When the hunt was up, his combativeness was overruling. It was probably a mistake to draw McLaws away from his position at Marye's Hill, where he and Ransom had successfully held against six or seven severe attacks of som's. General Early was assigned to that position with five brigades. He was attacked by about one-fourth the number of McLaws's assailants, the position was carried, and Early was driven off in confusion, losing, besides large numbers as prisonersrched by the Plank road, and Early marched back to his late position at Marye's Hill. So General Lee was obliged to take McLaws and Anderson from his battle at Chancellorsville to drive back the force threatening his rear. The battle as pitched
Potomac, according to its return of a few days before, consisted of officers and men actually available for line of battle, 113,838, with 404 pieces of artillery. Rebellion Record, vol. XXV. part II. p. 320. The return of casualties showed the enormous loss of 17,287. Returns of the Army of Northern Virginia for March, 1863, showed an effective aggregate of 59,681 ; Ibid., p. 696. batteries in action, about 160 guns. To this may possibly be added one thousand of troops returning during April in time for the battle. The casualties reported by the medical director numbered 10,281, but reports of the commanders showed over 12,000, not including artillery or cavalry, or slightly wounded and missing, which would probably add another thousand. Chancellorsville is usually accepted as General Lee's most brilliant achievement, and, considered as an independent affair, it was certainly grand. As I had no part in its active conduct, it is only apropos to this writing to consider the
Chapter 24: preparing for the spring of 1863. Burnside's abortive moves the mud march General Hooker supersedes Burnside the Confederates strengthen their position for the winter Longstreet ordered to Petersburg Secretary of War Seddon and the Author talk of General Grant and the Confederate situation on the Mississippi and in the West Longstreet makes a radical proposition for Confederate concentration in Tennessee, thus to compel Grant to abandon Vicksburg the skilful use of interior lines the only way of equalizing the contest battle of Chancellorsville, Lee's brilliant achievement criticism death of Stonewall Jackson the resolve to march northward the Army reorganized in three Corps Ewell and A. P. Hill appointed Lieutenant Generals. Before we were fully settled in our winter quarters, and when just beginning to enjoy our camp theatricals, we heard that General Burnside was looking for another crossing by the lower Rappahannock. We were not greatly co
March, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 24
art, however, General Lee was getting his ranks together, and putting them in condition for other useful work. At the time of the battle of Chancellorsville the Army of the Potomac, according to its return of a few days before, consisted of officers and men actually available for line of battle, 113,838, with 404 pieces of artillery. Rebellion Record, vol. XXV. part II. p. 320. The return of casualties showed the enormous loss of 17,287. Returns of the Army of Northern Virginia for March, 1863, showed an effective aggregate of 59,681 ; Ibid., p. 696. batteries in action, about 160 guns. To this may possibly be added one thousand of troops returning during April in time for the battle. The casualties reported by the medical director numbered 10,281, but reports of the commanders showed over 12,000, not including artillery or cavalry, or slightly wounded and missing, which would probably add another thousand. Chancellorsville is usually accepted as General Lee's most brill
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