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A. L. Long (search for this): chapter 43
f cause and effect actually followed. An event occurred on the 7th, says General Long, which must not be omitted from the narrative. Perceiving the difficulties , did not appear in the list presented by Pendleton. Memoirs of General Lee, A. L. Long. A little after nightfall a flag of truce appeared under torchlight in front seems that General Pendleton then went to General Lee and made the report. General Long's account of the interview, as reported by Pendleton, is as follows: Gened and his judgment decided, there his heart was. Memoirs of Robert E. Lee, A. L. Long. The delicate affection that prompted the knights of later days to offer n the advance commands moved, --four hours after the time ordered. To these General Long's batteries of thirty guns were attached. They met Sheridan's cavalry advans right, then I will take all the responsibility! Memoirs of Robert E. Lee, A. L. Long. Presently General Lee called to have me ride forward to him. He was dres
J. K. Marshall (search for this): chapter 43
I assured him that I knew General Grant well enough to say that the terms would be such as he would demand under similar circumstances, but he yet had doubts. The conversation continued in broken sentences until the bearer of the return despatch approached. As he still seemed apprehensive of humiliating demands, I suggested that in that event he should break off the interview and tell General Grant to do his worst. The thought of another round seemed to brace him, and he rode with Colonel Marshall, of his staff, to meet the Union commander. The status of affairs spread through the advance troops of the army, but the work of preparation on my rear line was continued. General Field inquired of a passing officer, What's up? but, seeing arrangements going on for attack in our rear, he continued his work of preparation to receive it. General Grant was found prepared to offer as liberal terms as General Lee could expect, and, to obviate a collision between his army of the rea
prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand combinations and strategy of General Grant, the higher will be his award as a great soldier. Confederates should be foremost in crediting him with all that
George E. Pickett (search for this): chapter 43
e to march at one o'clock in the morning, the trains and advanced forces to push through the village in time for my column to stand and prepare to defend at that point in case of close pursuit. General Gordon reported, as I remember, less than two thousand men. (General Fitzhugh Lee puts it at sixteen hundred, but he may have overlooked Wallace's brigade, which joined the advance on that day.) My column was about as it was when it marched from Petersburg. Parts of Ewell's, Anderson's, and Pickett's commands not captured on the march were near us, and reported to me, except Wallace's brigade. On the 9th the rear-guard marched as ordered, but soon came upon standing trains of wagons in the road and still in park alongside. The command was halted, deployed into position, and ordered to intrench against the pursuing army. It was five o'clock when the advance commands moved, --four hours after the time ordered. To these General Long's batteries of thirty guns were attached. Th
April 7th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 43
list presented by Pendleton. Memoirs of General Lee, A. L. Long. A little after nightfall a flag of truce appeared under torchlight in front of Mahone's line bearing a note to General Lee: Headquarters Armies of the United States, 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Army: General,-- The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is sg Armies of the United States. I was sitting at his side when the note was delivered. He read it and handed it to me without referring to its contents. After reading it I gave it back, saying, Not yet. General Lee wrote in reply,-- April 7, 1865. General,-- I have received your note of this day. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion
April 9th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 43
sed their hands gently over the sides of Traveller. He rode with his hat off, and had sufficient control to fix his eyes on a line between the ears of Traveller and look neither to right nor left until he reached a large white-oak tree, where he dismounted to make his last Headquarters, and finally talked a little. The shock was most severe upon Field's division. Seasoned by four years of battle triumphant, the veterans in that body stood at Appomattox when the sun rose on the 9th day of April, 1865, as invincible of valor as on the morning of the 31st of August, 1862, after breaking up the Union lines of the second field of Manassas. They had learned little of the disasters about Petersburg, less of that at Sailor's Creek, and surrender had not had time to enter their minds until it was announced accomplished! The reported opportunity to break through the enemy's lines proved a mistake. General Mumford, suspecting surrender from the sudden quiet of the front, made a dashi
April 8th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 43
in mutinous conduct towards him, he had confidence that we were firm and steady in waiting to execute his last command. During the day General Grant wrote General Lee in reply to his note of the 7th inquiring as to terms of surrender,-- April 8, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Army: General,-- Your note of last evening in reply to mine of the same date, asking the conditions on which I will accept surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, is just received. In same purpose, at any point agreeable to you, for the purpose of arranging definitely the terms upon which the surrender of the Army.of Northern Virginia will be received. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. In reply, General Lee wrote,-- April 8, 1865. General,-- I received at a late hour your note of to-day. In mine of yesterday I did not intend to propose the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, but to ask the terms of your proposition. To be frank, I do not think the emergen
Chapter 43: Appomattox. Some of General Lee's officers say to him that further resistance is hopeless Longstreet does not approve General Grant calls for surrender-not yet the Confederate chieftain asks terms his response to his officers as represented by General Pendleton correspondence of Generals Lee and Grant morning of April 9 General Lee rides to meet the Federal commander, while Longstreet forms the last line of battle Longstreet endeavors to recall his chief, hearing of a break where the Confederate troops could pass Custer demands surrender of Longstreet reminded of irregularity, and that he was in the enemy's lines meeting with General Grant capitulation last scenes. The beginning of the end was now at hand,--not perhaps necessarily, but, at least, as the sequence of cause and effect actually followed. An event occurred on the 7th, says General Long, which must not be omitted from the narrative. Perceiving the difficulties that surrounded
August 31st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 43
at off, and had sufficient control to fix his eyes on a line between the ears of Traveller and look neither to right nor left until he reached a large white-oak tree, where he dismounted to make his last Headquarters, and finally talked a little. The shock was most severe upon Field's division. Seasoned by four years of battle triumphant, the veterans in that body stood at Appomattox when the sun rose on the 9th day of April, 1865, as invincible of valor as on the morning of the 31st of August, 1862, after breaking up the Union lines of the second field of Manassas. They had learned little of the disasters about Petersburg, less of that at Sailor's Creek, and surrender had not had time to enter their minds until it was announced accomplished! The reported opportunity to break through the enemy's lines proved a mistake. General Mumford, suspecting surrender from the sudden quiet of the front, made a dashing ride, and passed the enemy's lines with his division of cavalry, and
y column to stand and prepare to defend at that point in case of close pursuit. General Gordon reported, as I remember, less than two thousand men. (General Fitzhugh Lee puts it at sixteen hundred, but he may have overlooked Wallace's brigade, which joined the advance on that day.) My column was about as it was when it marched from Petersburg. Parts of Ewell's, Anderson's, and Pickett's commands not captured on the march were near us, and reported to me, except Wallace's brigade. On the 9th the rear-guard marched as ordered, but soon came upon standing trains of wagons in the road and still in park alongside. The command was halted, deployed into position, and ordered to intrench against the pursuing army. It was five o'clock when the advance commands moved, --four hours after the time ordered. To these General Long's batteries of thirty guns were attached. They met Sheridan's cavalry advancing across their route. The column was deployed, the cavalry on the right of the
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