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in the enemy's lines meeting with General Grant capitulation last scenes. The beginning of the end was now at hand,--not perhaps necessarily, but, at least, as the sequence of cause and effect actually followed. An event occurred on the 7th, says General Long, which must not be omitted from the narrative. Perceiving the difficulties that surrounded the army, and believing its extrication hopeless, a number of the principal officers, from a feeling of affection and sympathy for the cof our military history over twenty-eight thousand officers and men,--viz.: General Lee and staff15 Longstreet's corps Including the parts of the Third Corps attached after the fall of A. P. Hill, and about five thousand that reported on the 7th, 8th, and 9th in bands and squads from the columns broken up at Sailor's Creek.14,833 Gordon's corps Including five thousand two hundred of fragments dispersed at Petersburg and during the rearward march, that joined us in retreat.7,200 Ewell'
April 12th (search for this): chapter 43
ed against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand combinations and strategy of General Grant, the higher will be his award as a great soldier. Confederates should be foremost in crediting him with all that his admirers so justly claim, and ask at the same time that his great adversary be measured by the same high standards. On the 12th of April the Army of Northern Virginia marched to the field in front of Appomattox Court-House, and by divisions and parts of divisions deployed into line, stacked their arms, folded their colors, and walked empty-handed to find their distant, blighted homes. There were surrendered and paroled on the last day of our military history over twenty-eight thousand officers and men,--viz.: General Lee and staff15 Longstreet's corps Including the parts of the Third Corps attached after the fa
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