hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 538 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 492 4 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 478 10 Browse Search
Doc 448 0 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 263 1 Browse Search
B. J. Kilpatrick 260 0 Browse Search
A. G. H. Wood 245 1 Browse Search
Gettysburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) 239 3 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 231 1 Browse Search
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) 214 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 79 total hits in 27 results.

1 2 3
James H. Baker (search for this): chapter 121
re being murdered everywhere. Germans and negroes, when caught, were shot immediately. Many persons were shot down after they had been taken prisoners, and had been assured that they would not be hurt if they would surrender. Messrs. Trask and Baker, and two other citizens, were so taken, and while being marched toward the river as prisoners, after being assured that they would not be harmed, some guerrillas asked their names. Mr. Trask gave the names, when they were immediately fired upon, and all four killed on the spot, except Mr. Baker, who is not expected to live, however. Mr. Dix had been taken prisoner and his house set on fire, when one of the fiends told him, if he would give them his money, he would not be killed; otherwise he would. Mr. Dix went into the burning house, and got a thousand dollars, and handed it over. He was told to march toward the river, and had not proceeded twenty steps when he was shot dead from behind. Mr. Hampson, clerk of the Provost-Marshal,
-Governor Robinson, which, fortunately, is situated on the bank of the river. The guerrillas came and ordered the family (Mr. Robinson not being at home) to take out what they wanted, as they were going to burn it. They then left for town. When they returned, they were greeted with a volley from a small party of the Twelfth Kansas, on the opposite side, and three killed. Thinking the game would not pay, the scamps left. General Lane had a miraculous escape. He heard the firing, and saw Willis's stable burning, and made tracks through a large corn-field near his house. Inquiries were made by the gang for Lane's house, and a Mr. Spicer was detailed by them to show his house. Placing a pistol to his head they compelled him to pilot them to Lane's house. They could not catch the General, but burnt his house. The General soon after made his appearance, and is now after the murderers. Eighteen soldiers out of twenty-two, of the Kansas Fourteenth, at their recruiting rendezvous,
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 121
n the hall, and it was found that not an arm was in the house. Captain Banks told them the best thing they could do was to surrender, and this being agreed upon, Captain Banks took a white sheet, and waved it from the balcony. This was greeted by a universal shout from the guerrillas. The commander of the bushwhackers around the house asked Banks: Do you surrender this house? We do, and hope that you will treat our women and children with decency. To this the rebels agreed, and Banks asked for Colonel Quantrell. Quantrell was sent for, and soon came. He asked Banks whether he was a Federal officer, and being answered in the affirmative, assured Banks that they would all be treated as prisoBanks that they would all be treated as prisoners, and should not be molested. They were all searched, and everything valuable taken away from them — even the finger-rings of men and wode, and pointed out prominent men and things. One fellow got Captain Banks's uniform and made quite a display with it. A riding party o
en, women, and children as they passed down under the bank toward the river. There is no doubt but that Quantrell had spies at Lawrence. One man at the Eldridge House acted as a guide, and pointed out prominent men and things. One fellow got Captain Banks's uniform and made quite a display with it. A riding party of two ladies and gentlemen were met just outside the city, and compelled to go back. Quantrell invited the ladies to ride beside him into town, and they did so. General Collamore was suffocated to death by damps in his well. When he first discovered the guerrillas in town, he went into the well, and his hired man, named Keith, covered it up. After the trouble was over, the man went to the well and found the General at the bottom. He went down after him, and unfortunately met the same fate. A neighbor, named Lowe, passing along, went down to rescue both of them, and was also suffocated. It was peculiarly noticeable that the fury of the incarnate fiends was
Lydia Stone (search for this): chapter 121
e men, Quantrell allowed them to go to the Whitney House, kept by Mr. Stone. Quantrell said Mr. Stone once saved his life, and he was not thMr. Stone once saved his life, and he was not the man to forget past favors. As soon as the Eldridge was surrendered, the house was searched. The inmates of the rooms were aroused from thd a sister shot by Union men; the third said he wanted to kill Miss Lydia Stone, the landlord's daughter; the fourth was a sober man, and seemne of the party had forcibly taken possession of a gold ring from Miss Stone, and she informed Quantrell of the fact, who told the fellow if he did not hand it over he would shoot him. But Miss Stone escaped. They wanted also to kill Mr. R. S. Stevens and another man, but they made shot him, but the wound did not prove fatal. Others were shot. Mr. Stone remonstrated with them, when one of them shot him through the heawe hear spoken of and deserves particular mention; her name is Miss Lydia Stone, daughter of the landlord of the Whitney House. She moved rou
s the rebels agreed, and Banks asked for Colonel Quantrell. Quantrell was sent for, and soon came.Quantrell was sent for, and soon came. He asked Banks whether he was a Federal officer, and being answered in the affirmative, assured Bcount of indiscriminate shooting by the men, Quantrell allowed them to go to the Whitney House, kept by Mr. Stone. Quantrell said Mr. Stone once saved his life, and he was not the man to forget pashey supposed, located in the Whitney House. Quantrell had chosen this place for his headquarters, dry up. Every thing went on very well while Quantrell was there; he promised that he would be the , blue blouse, and had on a black hat. After Quantrell left, four of his men came back and said the gold ring from Miss Stone, and she informed Quantrell of the fact, who told the fellow if he did nard the river. There is no doubt but that Quantrell had spies at Lawrence. One man at the Eldrioutside the city, and compelled to go back. Quantrell invited the ladies to ride beside him into t[1 more...]
August 21st (search for this): chapter 121
Doc. 119.-the massacre at Lawrence, Kansas. Statement of William Kempf. Mr. Kempf was an attache of the Provost-Marshal's office at Lawrence. yesterday, the twenty-first of August, about half-past 4 o'clock, the citizens of Lawrence were surprised to hear a body of cavalry ride rapidly toward the Kansas River. As soon as the first of these men reached the river by.Massachusetts street and the streets east and west of it, they raised a shout, which was repeated down the streets as far as it was possible to hear. The citizens, startled by the noise, rushed into the streets to ascertain the cause. Many of the citizens were then shot down. With the quickness of lightning, the news spread over town that the accursed Quantrell, with his bushwhackers, was in town. The surprise was so complete that it was utterly impossible for the citizens to undertake any thing whatever for their defence. The few who heroically run out with their guns were quickly murdered, as were, in
1 2 3