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Frank P. Blair (search for this): chapter 3.28
spersed by the enemy's flank fire.--editors. Schirmer managed 1. Union breastworks in the woods between Dowdall's Tavern and Chancellorsville. 2. Relics of the dead in the woods near the Plank road. 3. The Plank road near where Jackson fell. from photographs taken in 1864. the reserve artillery fairly. Dilger, the battery commander on Schurz's left, rolled the balls along the Plank road and shelled the wood. General Steinwehr was on hand, cool, collected, and judicious. Like Blair at Atlanta, he had made his men (who were south of Dowdall's) spring to the reverse side of their intrenchments and be ready to fire the instant it was possible. Let us pause here a moment and follow Doles, who led the enemy's attack. He states that, after his first successful charge, the command moved forward at the double-quick to assault the enemy, who had taken up a strong position on the crest of a hill in the open field. This position was the one on Hawkins's farm where Devens's a
nwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my adjutant-general. See pp. 219 and 220. The original dispatch is not on file in the War Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of Howard's headquarters. The entry in Howard's book appears to have been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furnished General Howard ; and the i
Alfred Pleasonton (search for this): chapter 3.28
arm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had nused to the first division of our enemy, all his rear lines had closed up, and the broad mass began to appear even below me on my left front to the south of Steinwehr's knoll. Then it was, after we had been fighting an hour, that Sickles's and Pleasonton's guns began to be heard, for they had faced about at Hazel Grove obliquely toward the north-west, and were hurrying artillery, cavalry, and infantry into position to do what they could against the attack now reaching them. I had come to my
John W. Colquitt (search for this): chapter 3.28
re in position; the line of battle of his own brigade touched the pike west of us with its right and stretched away to the north; beyond his brigade came Iverson's in the same line. On the right of the pike was Doles's brigade, and to his right Colquitt's. One hundred yards to the rear was Trimble's division (Colston Major-General Carl Schurz. From a photograph. commanding), with Ramseur on the right following Colquitt. After another interval followed the division of A. P. Hill. The advanColquitt. After another interval followed the division of A. P. Hill. The advance Confederate division had more men in it than there were in the Eleventh Corps, now in position. Counting the ranks of this formidable column, beginning with the enveloping skirmish line, we find 7, besides the 3 ranks of file-closers. Many of them were brought into a solid mass by the entanglements of the forest, and gave our men the idea that battalions were formed in close columns doubled on the center. With as little noise as possible, a little after 5 P. M., the steady advance of the e
Richard H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 3.28
lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, a comparatively short front between the Rappahannock and the Catherine Furnace, not exceeding two miles and a half in extent. His right wing, not far from the river, was behind Mott's Run, which flows due east, and his left was deployed along the Catherine Furnace road. Could Hooker, on the first day of May, hav
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 3.28
lank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hanco four miles south from Ely's ford, where were Hooker's nearest cavalry flankers. In his report aft Lee's, was so badly handled by the enemy that Hooker at last deemed it safer to return to the north the enemy's charge. It was occasioned by General Hooker, with Colonel Comstock and a few staff-off purpose. About midday Sickles received General Hooker's orders to advance south cautiously. Sooenemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore,n, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Hoood strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neitWar Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letthave been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furni[14 more...]
Adolph Steinwehr (search for this): chapter 3.28
road and Buschbeck on his right. With them Steinwehr covered a mile, leaving but two regiments fodden crack of rifle-shooting. It began with Steinwehr's skirmishers, and then passed on to Schurz.ents well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face aboucame to me. But Generals Devens, Schurz, and Steinwehr, my division commanders, and myself did prect was to be done with our men, and to see if Steinwehr's division, as was probable, must swing in tssons, and horses. This was the fire that Steinwehr and I heard shortly after our return from Bang the Plank road and shelled the wood. General Steinwehr was on hand, cool, collected, and judicien below me on my left front to the south of Steinwehr's knoll. Then it was, after we had been fige forest was necessarily a short one. General Steinwehr, being now exposed from flank and rear, the crest facing to the rear, and as soon as Steinwehr's troops had cleared the way these guns bega[6 more...]
ery sort of organization that lay in the path of the mad current of panic-stricken men, Colonel von Gilsa's report of the crisis is as follows: . . . A patrol of the 45th New York regiment repThird Division, but I did not find the second line; it was abandoned before we reached it. Von Gilsa's brigade lost 133 killed and wounded out of an effective of 1400 men.--editors. had to give wts General Devens's report is very explicit upon this point, and states as follows: Colonel von Gilsa's skirmishers were, between 3 and 4 o'clock in the afternoon, attacked by the skirmishers of the enemy with the evident intention of feeling our position. After this Colonel von Gilsa's skirmishers were pushed farther to the front, and the major-general commanding the corps again rode doof General Barlow's brigade, which I had previously located in reserve and en ├ęchelon with Colonel von Gilsa's, so as to cover his right flank. This was the only general reserve I had. Stonewall
George Stoneman (search for this): chapter 3.28
some forty degrees with the Orange Plank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and left. French's division was in his rear. Meade occupied the extreme left, and my corps, the Eleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle.
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 3.28
redericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two midericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLawuld Hooker, on the first day of May, have known Lee's exact location, he never could have had a betnd fortified as it was, our army, out-numbering Lee's, was so badly handled by the enemy that Hookel, artillery and infantry, twelve thousand men. Lee faced us with five large divisions, having on ting reconnoissance, evidently to determine, for Lee's and Jackson's information, the position of oul forward movement. We forgot these friends to Lee as we excitedly marched to Friday's battle. Whs formed part of the famous night conference of Lee and Jackson, where cracker-boxes served as seats and tables. General Lee says: It was therefore resolved to endeavor to turn his right flank and rs above his confreres, and after his death General Lee could not replace him. Rescuing the wound
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