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Hovey (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
to send one brigade from his division. McPherson ordered two batteries to be stationed where they nearly enfiladed the enemy's line, and they did good execution. From Logan's position now a direct forward movement would carry him over open fields in rear of the enemy and in a line parallel with them. He did make exactly this move, attacking, however, the enemy through the belt of woods covering the west slope of the hill for a short distance. Up to this time I had kept my position near Hovey, where we were the most heavily pressed; but about noon I moved with a part of my staff by our right, around, until I came up with Logan himself. I found him near the road leading down to Baker's Creek. He was actually in command of the only road over which the enemy could retreat; Hovey, reenforced by two brigades from McPherson's command, confronted the enemy's left; Crocker, with two brigades, covered their left flank; McClernand, two hours before, had been within two and a half miles o
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
insburg and come up without stopping, except to get two days rations. McPherson still had one division west of the Mississippi River guarding the road from Milliken's Bend to the river below until Sherman's command should relieve it. When the moands; 250 miles of the river, from Vicksburg to Port Hudson, had become ours. The Union force that had crossed the Mississippi River up to this time was less than 43,000 men. One division of these — Blair's — only arrived in time to take part in thpatch. The ground about Vicksburg is admirable for defense. On the north it is about two hundred feet above the Mississippi River at the highest point, and very much cut up by the washing rains; the ravines were grown up with cane and underbrushaying I would send him all the troops he wanted to insure the capture of the only foothold the enemy now had on the Mississippi River. General Banks had a number of copies of this letter printed, or at least a synopsis of it, and very soon a copy fe
Bridgeport (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
n crossing Big Black River. From a water-color. our victory. He was directed to commence the march early next day, and to diverge from the road he was on, to Bridgeport, on the Big Black River, some eleven miles above where we expected to find the enemy. Blair was ordered to join him there with the pontoon train as early as po and wherever found, for this purpose. By 8 o'clock on the morning of the 18th all three bridges were complete and the troops were crossing. Sherman reached Bridgeport about noon of the 17th, and found Blair with Map of the siege of Vicksburgh. From General Badeau's Military history of Ulysses S. Grant. D. Appleton & Co.,h Fork, Bayou Pierre     1   Skirmishes, May 3d 19  Fourteen Mile Creek 624  Raymond 6633937 Jackson 422517 Champion's Hill 4101844187 Big Black 392373 Bridgeport  1     Total[In all, 4379]6953425259 Of the wounded many were but slightly so, and continued on duty. Not half of them were disabled for any le
Utica (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
Pherson drew in his troops north of the Big Black and was off at an early hour on the road to Jackson, via Rocky Springs, Utica, and Raymond. That night he and McClernand were both at Rocky Springs, ten miles from Hankinson's Ferry. McPherson remaSandy and Sherman marched from Grand Gulf to Hankinson's Ferry. The 8th McPherson moved to a point within a few miles of Utica; McClernand and Sherman remained where they were. On the 10th McPherson moved to Utica; Sherman to Big Sandy,--McClernanUtica; Sherman to Big Sandy,--McClernand was still at Big Sandy. The 11th McClernand was at Five Mile Creek; Sherman at Auburn; McPherson five miles advanced from Utica. May 12th McClernand was at Fourteen Mile Creek; Sherman at Fourteen Mile Creek; McPherson at Raymond, after a battleUtica. May 12th McClernand was at Fourteen Mile Creek; Sherman at Fourteen Mile Creek; McPherson at Raymond, after a battle. After McPherson crossed the Big Black at Hankinson's Ferry, Vicksburg could have been approached and besieged by the south side. It is not probable, however, that Pemberton would have permitted a close besiegement. The broken nature of the
Mound City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
above the town. Bruinsburg is two miles from high ground. The bottom at that point is higher than most of the low land in the valley of the Mississippi, and a good road leads to the bluff. It was natural to expect the garrison from Grand Gulf to come out to meet us, and prevent, if they could, our reaching this Rear-Admiral Porter's flotilla passing the Vicksburg batteries, night of April 16, 1863, the flag-ship Benton leading, followed by the Louisville, Lafayette, General Price, Mound City, Pittsburg, Carondelet, and Tuscumbia ; and the transports Henry Clay, forest Queen, and Silverware. from a War-time sketch. solid base. Bayou Pierre enters the Mississippi just above Bruinsburg; and as it is a navigable stream, and was high at the time, in order to intercept us they had to go by Port Gibson, the nearest point where there was a bridge to cross upon. This more than doubled the distance from Grand Gulf to the high land back of Bruinsburg. No time was to be lost in secur
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
came to them, saying all their suffering was in vain, Vicksburg would never be taken, were at last at an end, and the Union sure to be saved. Bowen was received by General A. J. Smith, and asked to see me. I had been a neighbor of Bowen's in Missouri, and knew him well and favorably before the war; but his request was refused. He then suggested that I should meet Pemberton. To this I sent a verbal message saying that if Pemberton desired it I would meet him in front of McPherson's corps, aCrocker ended the campaign fitted to command independent armies. General F. P. Blair joined me at Milliken's Bend, a full-fledged general, without having served in a lower grade. He commanded a division in the campaign. I had known Blair in Missouri, where I had voted against him in 1858 when he ran for Congress. I knew him as a frank, positive, and generous man, true to his friends even to a fault, but always a leader. I dreaded his coming. I knew from experience that it was more diffic
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
tian and Sanitary Commissions came to minister to the wants of the sick and the wounded. Often those coming to see a son or brother would bring a dozen or two of poultry. They did not know how little the gift would be appreciated; many soldiers had lived so much on chickens, ducks, and turkeys, without bread, during the march, that the sight of poultry, if they could get bacon, almost took away their appetite. But the intention was good. Among the earliest arrivals was the Governor of Illinois [Yates], with most of the State officers. I naturally wanted to show them what there was of most interest. In Sherman's front the ground was the most broken and most Position of Hovey's division of McClernand's Corps. From a Lithograph. In the foreground is the siege-battery; below is the wooded ravine; from left to right are seen the camps of the 34th Indiana, 29th Wisconsin, 11th Indiana., 46th Indiana, and 25th Indiana; half-way to the summit are the rifle-pits of Hovey's divisi
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
to believe that we intended to cross the Big Black and attack the city at once. On the 6th Sherman arrived at Grand Gulf, and crossed his command that night and the next day. Three days rations had been brought up from Urand Uult for the advanced troops, and were issued. Orders were given for a forward movement the next day. Sherman was directed to order up Blair, who had been left behind to guard the road from Milliken's Bend to Hard Times with two brigades. The quartermaster at Young's Point was ordered to send 200 wagons with General Blair, and the commissary was to load them with hardbread, coffee, sugar, salt, and 100,000 pounds of salt meat. On the 3d Hurlbut, who had been left at Memphis, was ordered to send four regiments from his command to Milliken's Bend to relieve Blair's division, and on Major-General Richard J. Oglesby. From a photograph. the 5th he was ordered to send Lauman's division in addition, the latter to join the army in the field. The four regim
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
own. Bruinsburg is two miles from high ground. The bottom at that point is higher than most of the low land in the valley of the Mississippi, and a good road leads to the bluff. It was natural to expect the garrison from Grand Gulf to come out to meet us, and prevent, if they could, our reaching this Rear-Admiral Porter's flotilla passing the Vicksburg batteries, night of April 16, 1863, the flag-ship Benton leading, followed by the Louisville, Lafayette, General Price, Mound City, Pittsburg, Carondelet, and Tuscumbia ; and the transports Henry Clay, forest Queen, and Silverware. from a War-time sketch. solid base. Bayou Pierre enters the Mississippi just above Bruinsburg; and as it is a navigable stream, and was high at the time, in order to intercept us they had to go by Port Gibson, the nearest point where there was a bridge to cross upon. This more than doubled the distance from Grand Gulf to the high land back of Bruinsburg. No time was to be lost in securing this fo
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.69
any troops. I looked upon side movements, as long as the enemy held Port Hudson and Vicksburg, as a waste of time and material. General Joseph E. Johnston arrived at Jackson in the night of the 13th, from Tennessee, and immediately assumed command of all the Confederate troops in Mississippi. I knew he was expecting reenforcements from the south and east. On the 6th I had written to General Halleck, Information from the other side leaves me to believe the enemy are bringing forces from Tullahoma. Up to this time my troops had been kept in supporting distances of each other as far as the nature of the country would admit. Reconnoissances were constantly made from each corps to enable them to acquaint themselves with the most practicable routes from one to another in case a union became necessary. McPherson reached Clinton with the advance early on the 13th, and immediately set to work destroying the railroad. Sherman's advance reached Raymond before the last of McPherson's
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