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d more fighting but was holding its position. It was finally decided that Warren should send Ayres down the Boydton plank and across by the Brooks road, and Griffin and Crawford by the Crump road, which runs from the White Oak road south to J. Boisseau's. [See map, p. 539.] Mackenzie's small division of cavalry was ordered to march to Dinwiddie and report to Sheridan. All haste was urged, in the hope that at daylight the enemy might be caught between Warren's two divisions of infantry on onent with me. After traveling again by way of the Brooks road, I met Sheridan, about 10 A. M., on the Five Forks road not far from J. Boisseau's house. Ayres had his division on this road, having arrived about daylight, and Griffin had reached J. Boisseau's between 7 and 8 A. M. I had a full conference with Sheridan. He told me the force in front of him had fallen back early in the morning, that he had pursued with his cavalry and had had several brushes with the enemy, and was driving him ste
A. J. McGonnigle (search for this): chapter 16.107
aggered by a heavy fire from the angle and fell back in some confusion. Sheridan now rushed into the midst of the broken lines, and cried out: Where is my battle-flag? As the sergeant who carried it rode up, Sheridan seized the crimson and white standard, waved it above his head, cheered on the men, and made heroic efforts to close up the ranks. Bullets were humming like a swarm of bees. One pierced the battle-flag, another killed the sergeant who had carried it, another wounded Captain A. J. McGonnigle in the side, others struck two or three of the staff-officers' horses. All this time Sheridan was dashing from one point of the line to another, waving his flag, shaking his fist, encouraging, threatening, praying, swearing, the very incarnation of battle. It would be a sorry soldier who could help following such a leader. Ayres and his officers were equally exposing themselves at all points in rallying the men, and soon the line was steadied, for such material could suffer but a
Alfred H. Terry (search for this): chapter 16.107
he morning; we have but a few hours of daylight left us. My cavalry are rapidly exhausting their ammunition, and if the attack is delayed much longer they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers were sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At 4 o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from right to left as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run to guard the trains. I rode to the front in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. When this division became engaged, Warren took up a more central position with reference to his corps. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line, a
Simon G. Griffin (search for this): chapter 16.107
s division had been driven in, and both he and Crawford were falling back upon Griffin. Miles, of Humphreys's corps, was sent to reenforce Warren, and by noon the een should send Ayres down the Boydton plank and across by the Brooks road, and Griffin and Crawford by the Crump road, which runs from the White Oak road south to J.ouse. Ayres had his division on this road, having arrived about daylight, and Griffin had reached J. Boisseau's between 7 and 8 A. M. I had a full conference with Snd form in order of battle, with Ayres on the left, Crawford on his right, and Griffin in rear as a reserve. The corps was to wheel to the left, and make its attackrelieved Warren, directed him to report in person to General Grant, and placed Griffin in command of the Fifth Corps. I had sent frequent bulletins during the day tned to call him, was in advance thundering along with his cavalry, followed by Griffin and the rest of the Army of the Potomac, while Ord was swinging along toward B
Richard H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 16.107
essing forward the good work. By Lieutenant-General Richard H. Anderson, C. S. A. From a photograph. noon,lry held the road just in front of General [R. H.] Anderson, and was so strongly posted that he had halted a s the road nearer the river, while I hurried to General Anderson's aid. General [John B.] Gordon's corps turned off after the trains. General Anderson informed me that at least two divisions of cavalry were in his front,my column in large force preparing to attack. General Anderson informed me that he would make the attack in flow us at the same time. Just as it attacked, General Anderson made his assault, which was repulsed in five mheir charge, brought him word of its failure. General Anderson rode rapidly toward his command. I returned ta cavalry officer who came in by the same road General Anderson had gone out on. At my request he sent a messe a note from me telling him he was surrounded, General Anderson's attack had failed, I had surrendered, and li
George W. Getty (search for this): chapter 16.107
of the heights on which General Ewell had rested the divisions of his army, ready for an attack if made, and with the hope that under cover of night the whole Confederate army might escape in safety to Danville. The pursuing troops were halted on tile face of the hills skirting the valley, within the range of the enemy's guns, and lines were adjusted for an assault. Artillery was put in position on these hills, and a heavy fire was immediately opened. An effort was made to get up General G. W. Getty's division of the Sixth Corps, and a portion of the Second Brigade of the Third Division, which had been dispatched to attack a battery on the right, but the day was too far spent to await their arrival. After a few moments' delay, General Wright, as directed by General Sheridan, ordered an immediate assault to be made, by the infantry, under tlhe cover of the artillery fire. Colonel Stagg's brigade of cavalry was, at the same time, ordered by General Sheridan to attack and, if poss
Peter T. Hudson (search for this): chapter 16.107
me fully as to the progress of his movements. You know my views, and I want you to give them to Sheridan fully. Tell him the contemplated movement is left entirely in his hands, and he must be responsible for its execution. I have every confidence in his judgment and ability. I hope there may now be an opportunity of fighting the enemy's infantry out-side of its fortifications. I set out with half a dozen mounted orderlies to act as couriers in transmitting field bulletins. Captain Peter T. Hudson, of our staff, went with me. After traveling again by way of the Brooks road, I met Sheridan, about 10 A. M., on the Five Forks road not far from J. Boisseau's house. Ayres had his division on this road, having arrived about daylight, and Griffin had reached J. Boisseau's between 7 and 8 A. M. I had a full conference with Sheridan. He told me the force in front of him had fallen back early in the morning, that he had pursued with his cavalry and had had several brushes with the en
the right, but the day was too far spent to await their arrival. After a few moments' delay, General Wright, as directed by General Sheridan, ordered an immediate assault to be made, by the infantry, under tlhe cover of the artillery fire. Colonel Stagg's brigade of cavalry was, at the same time, ordered by General Sheridan to attack and, if possible, flank the extreme right of the enemy's position. General Merritt's cavalry divisions (First and Third) simultaneously attacked the ConfederatConfederate masses. These masses were soon subjected to a terrible infantry fire upon both flanks as well as by the artillery in front. The swollen stream forbade a Confederate advance to attack the unguarded artillery. General Merritt and Colonel Stagg's cavalry, in a simultaneous attack, overthrew all before them on the right and rear. The Confederate officers gallantly struggled to avert disaster, and bravely tried to form lines to the right and left to repel the flank attacks. This lat
M. V. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 16.107
o the sending of the Fifth Corps to report to Sheridan. About 7:40 Captain M. V. Sheridan, of Sheris ordered to march to Dinwiddie and report to Sheridan. All haste was urged, in the hope that at da on the ground. You're not hurt a bit, cried Sheridan; pick up your gun, man, and move right on to oin in the general scrimmage. He reported to Sheridan in person, and was ordered to strike out towalag? As the sergeant who carried it rode up, Sheridan seized the crimson and white standard, waved rg. From a photograph. no such thing, cried Sheridan. I don't believe a word of it. You'll find Femy's line. The battle now rages furiously. Sheridan with his cavalry, the Fifth Corps, and Miles'tch so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan Captain John R. Tucker, C. S. N. From a phof. The general said he would go at once to Sheridan, and dismounted from his black pony Jeff Davicavalry was, at the same time, ordered by General Sheridan to attack and, if possible, flank the ext[75 more...]
Sumner H. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 16.107
cers of his staff had bidden good-bye to President Lincoln and mounted the passenger car of the specess of the present movement. Referring to Mr. Lincoln, he said: The President is one of the few vght. The general had not been unmindful of Mr. Lincoln's anxiety. Soon after my arrival he telegrneral wrote a telegram with his own hand to Mr. Lincoln, as follows: Both Wright and Parke got throhe tidings which the general was sending to Mr. Lincoln. The general and staff now rode out to t At 4: 40 the general, who had been keeping Mr. Lincoln fully advised of the history that was so raonce with the leading infantry columns, but Mr. Lincoln had telegraphed that he was on his way, andolong his stay until the President came up. Mr. Lincoln, accompanied by his little son Tad, dismoun enemy single-handed. I see, I see, said Mr. Lincoln, but I never thought of it in that light. roops here are amply able to handle Lee. Mr. Lincoln then began to talk about the civil complica[1 more...]
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