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St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
now repelling the incursion of Price into Missouri. As they were not immediately forthcoming, General Grant had ordered General Rawlins, his chief-of-staff, to St. Louis, to direct, in person, their speedy embarkation. Thence, on the 7th of November, two weeks before Hood began his advance from Florence, General Rawlins wrote toed or more eagerly welcomed than this. But the promise could not be fulfilled. Smith had to march entirely across the State of Missouri; and instead of leaving St. Louis on the 10th, he did not arrive there until the 24th. Had he come at the proposed time, it was General Thomas's intention to place him at Eastport, on the Tennesh such disposition, the battles of Franklin and Nashville would have been relegated to the category of events which never come to pass. 7 But when Smith reached St. Louis, Hood was threatening Columbia; and it was an open question whether he would not reach Nashville before the reenforcements from Missouri. As fast as the Unio
Decherd (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
ions in Georgia, and that formidable raider, General Forrest, playing the mischief in west Tennessee, sent to the latter State two divisions--General Newton's of the Fourth Corps, and General J. D. Morgan's of the Fourteenth--to aid in destroying, if possible, that intrepid dragoon. To make assurance doubly sure, the next day he ordered General George H. Thomas, his most capable and experienced lieutenant, and the commander of more than three-fifths of his grand army, back to Stevenson and Decherd . . . to look to Tennessee. No order could have been more unwelcome to General Thomas. It removed him from the command of his own thoroughly organized and harmonious army of sixty thousand veterans, whom he knew and trusted, and who knew and loved him, and relegated him to the position of supervisor of communications. It also sent him to the rear just when great preparations were making for an advance. But, as often happens, what seemed an adverse fate opened the door to great, unfore
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
al George H. Thomas. From a photograph. to Nashville cross Duck River, and where there were less ver, and the only line of communication with Nashville would have been in the hands of the enemy. uch disposition, the battles of Franklin and Nashville would have been relegated to the category of an open question whether he would not reach Nashville before the reenforcements from Missouri. t Smith had not yet arrived, but would be at Nashville in three days--that is, Thursday. The expec within the friendly shelter of the works at Nashville, where they also welcomed the veterans of A. of colored troops from the railroad between Nashville and Johnsonville. Their arrival completed tbtained. At that time they did not exist at Nashville. [See map, p. 434.] The next day Hood's submit without a murmur. As he Hill near Nashville from which Bate's Confederate division was dl its fighting,--from the Tennessee River to Nashville and back again,--was less than six thousand [8 more...]
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
shville, where they also welcomed the veterans of A. J. Smith, who were just arriving from Missouri. Soon after, a body of about five thousand men came in from Chattanooga, chiefly of General Sherman's army, too late for their proper commands. These were organized into a provisional division under General J. B. Steedman, and were the hill, its right joining Wilson's left, was A. J. Smith's corps, full of cheer and enterprise, and glad to be once more in the open field. Then Views of Fort Negley on the left of the Union intrenchments, Nashville, between the Franklin and Nolensville pikes. From Photographs: the lower picture shows a casemate protected wont of the Capitol at Nashville. From a photograph: the view is toward the battle-field. Near the base of the first column is seen in the distance the flag of Fort Negley. charge. They took up their positions in front of the enemy's new line, at one point coming within 250 yards of the salient at Overton's Hill. Here they were
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
. Post's brigade of Wood's old division (now commanded by General Sam Beatty), which lay at the foot of Montgomery Hill, full of dash and spirit, had since morning been regarding the works at the summit with covetous eyes. At Post's suggestion, it was determined to see which party wanted them most. Accordingly, a charge was ordered — and in a moment the brigade was swarming up the hillside, straight for the enemy's advanced works. For almost the first time since the grand assault on Missionary Ridge, a year before, here was an open field where everything could be seen. From General Thomas's headquarters everybody looked on with breathless suspense, as the blue line, broken and irregular, but with steady persistence, made its way up the steep hillside against a fierce storm of musketry and artillery. Most of the shots, however, passed over the men's heads. It was a struggle to keep up with the colors, and, as they neared the top, only the strongest were at the front. Without a m
Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
On the 1st of November its leading division reached Pulaski, Tennessee, a small town on the railroad, about forty miles noral J. M. Schofield, to report to General Thomas. Reaching Pulaski, with one division, on the 14th of November, General Schofod's column was at Lawrenceburg, some 16 miles due west of Pulaski, Tennessee and on a road running direct to Columbia, where less than 800 men to guard the bridges. The situation at Pulaski, with an enemy nearly three times as large fairly on the f in the hands of the enemy. General Stanley, who had left Pulaski in the afternoon of the 23d, reached Lynnville after dark. troops arrived at Columbia, in their hurried retreat from Pulaski, works were thrown up, covering the approaches from the soe morning. It was now the fifth day since the retreat from Pulaski began, and the little army had been exposed day and night umber of men than General Thomas had been able to place at Pulaski to hinder his advance — to say nothing of his terrific los
Gadsden (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
gn. General Hood, after a series of daring adventures which baffled all Sherman's calculations ( he can turn and twist like a fox, said Sherman, and wear out my army in pursuit ), concentrated his entire force except Forrest's cavalry, at Gadsden, Alabama, on the 22d of October, while General Sherman established his headquarters at Gaylesville,--a position, as he wrote to General Halleck, very good to watch the enemy. In spite of this watch, Hood suddenly appeared on the 26th at Decatur, on the Tennessee River, seventy-five miles north-west of Gadsden. This move was a complete surprise, and evidently meant business. The Fourth Corps, numbering about twelve thousand men, commanded by Major-General D. S. Stanley, was at once ordered from Gaylesville, to report to General Thomas. On the 1st of November its leading division reached Pulaski, Tennessee, a small town on the railroad, about forty miles north of Decatur, where it was joined four days later by the other two. Making
Franklin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
Tennessee River, so as to threaten Hood's flank and rear if the latter advanced. With such disposition, the battles of Franklin and Nashville would have been relegated to the category of events which never come to pass. 7 But when Smith reached Stcame convinced that the enemy's infantry would begin crossing at daylight, and advised General Schofield to fall back to Franklin. At 3:30 the same morning General Thomas sent him similar orders. Daylight revealed the correctness of Wilson's informalry. At the same time, at Thompson's Station, three miles north, an attack was made on a small wagon train heading for Franklin; and a dash was made by a detachment of the Confederate cavalry on the Spring Hill station, north-west of the town. It e. The afternoon and night of November 29th, 1864, may well be set down in the calendar of The battle-field of Franklin, Tennessee, looking North from General Cheatham's headquarters. From a photograph. lost opportunities. The heroic valor o
Mount Carmel (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
tillery was placed on a rise south of the town. The trains were parked within the semicircle. From Spring Hill roads radiate to all points, the turnpike between Columbia and Franklin being there intersected by turnpikes from Rally Hill and Mount Carmel, as well as by numerous country roads leading to the neighboring towns. Possession of that point would not only shut out the Union army from the road to Nashville, but it would effectually bar the way in every direction. Stanley's arrival wa seems unaccountable. Brevet Major-General Emerson Opdycke. From a photograph. Except this one small division deployed in a long thin line to cover the wagons, there were no Union troops within striking distance; the cavalry were about Mount Carmel, five miles east, fully occupied in keeping Forrest away from Franklin and the Harpeth River crossings. The nearest aid was Kimball's division, seven miles south, at Rutherford Creek. The other three divisions of infantry which made up Schof
Johnsonville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
ith still another regiment behind that. West of the pike, reaching to a ravine through which passes a road branching from the Carter's Creek Pike, was Ruger's division of two brigades — the third, under General Cooper, not having come up from Johnsonville. Strickland's brigade, of four regiments, had two in the works and two in reserve. Two of these regiments, the 72d Illinois and 44th Missouri, belonged to A. J. Smith's corps, and had reported to General Schofield only the day before. A thider General J. B. Steedman, and were posted between the Murfreesboro' Pike and the river. Cooper's brigade also came in after a narrow escape from capture, as well as several regiments of colored troops from the railroad between Nashville and Johnsonville. Their arrival completed the force on which General Thomas was to rely for the task he now placed before himself — the destruction of Hood's army. It was an ill-assorted and heterogeneous mass, not yet welded into an army, and lacking a grea
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