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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
eral Sherman had finally determined on his march to the sea, he requested General Rosecrans, in Missouri, to send to General Thomas two divisions, under General A. J. Smith, which had been lent to General Banks for the Red River expedition, and were now repelling the incursion of Price into Missouri. As they were not immediately forthcoming, General Grant had ordered General Rawlins, his chief-ofhan this. But the promise could not be fulfilled. Smith had to march entirely across the State of Missouri; and instead of leaving St. Louis on the 10th, he did not arrive there until the 24th. Haand it was an open question whether he would not reach Nashville before the reenforcements from Missouri. As fast as the Union troops arrived at Columbia, in their hurried retreat from Pulaski, woat Nashville, where they also welcomed the veterans of A. J. Smith, who were just arriving from Missouri. Soon after, a body of about five thousand men came in from Chattanooga, chiefly of General Sh
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
iving orders to his staff-officers to be ready at 5 o'clock the next morning, went gladly to bed. The ice had not melted a day too soon; for, while he was writing the telegram to General Halleck, General Logan was speeding his way to Nashville, with orders from General Grant that would have placed him in command of all the Union forces there assembled. General Thomas, fortunately, did not then learn this second proof of General Grant's lack of confidence; and General Logan, on reaching Louisville, found that the work intended for him was already done — and came no farther. At the very time when these orders were made out at Washington, in obedience to General Grant's directions, a large part of the cavalry was unmounted; two divisions were absent securing horses and proper outfit; wagons were unfinished and mules lacking or unbroken; pontoons unmade and pontoniers untrained; the ground was The Capitol, Nashville. Strong works, set with cannon, inclosed the foundations of the
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.67
Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. by Henry Stone, Brevet Colonel, U. S. V., member of thee staff of General Thomas. On September 2hat formidable raider, General Forrest, playing the mischief in west Tennessee, sent to the latter State two divisions--General Newton's of thof his grand army, back to Stevenson and Decherd . . . to look to Tennessee. No order could have been more unwelcome to General Thomas. I On the 19th he wrote to General Thomas: I will send back to Tennessee the Fourth Corps, all dismounted cavalry, all sick and wounded, acept what I can haul in our wagons. . . . I want you to remain in Tennessee and take command of all my [military] division not actually presesupplies and for Forrest, who had been playing havoc throughout west Tennessee, from the line of the Mississippi border, northward to Kentucky's column was at Lawrenceburg, some 16 miles due west of Pulaski, Tennessee and on a road running direct to Columbia, where the railroad and
Nathaniel P. Banks (search for this): chapter 9.67
le after dark. Rousing his command at 1 o'clock in the morning, by 9 o'clock the head of his column connected with Cox in front of Columbia — having marched thirty miles since 2 o'clock of the preceding afternoon. These timely movements saved the little army from utter destruction. When General Sherman had finally determined on his march to the sea, he requested General Rosecrans, in Missouri, to send to General Thomas two divisions, under General A. J. Smith, which had been lent to General Banks for the Red River expedition, and were now repelling the incursion of Price into Missouri. As they were not immediately forthcoming, General Grant had ordered General Rawlins, his chief-of-staff, to St. Louis, to direct, in person, their speedy embarkation. Thence, on the 7th of November, two weeks before Hood began his advance from Florence, General Rawlins wrote to General Thomas that Smith's command, aggregating nearly 14,000, would begin to leave that place as early as the 10th. N
C. L. Stevenson (search for this): chapter 9.67
is communications in Georgia, and that formidable raider, General Forrest, playing the mischief in west Tennessee, sent to the latter State two divisions--General Newton's of the Fourth Corps, and General J. D. Morgan's of the Fourteenth--to aid in destroying, if possible, that intrepid dragoon. To make assurance doubly sure, the next day he ordered General George H. Thomas, his most capable and experienced lieutenant, and the commander of more than three-fifths of his grand army, back to Stevenson and Decherd . . . to look to Tennessee. No order could have been more unwelcome to General Thomas. It removed him from the command of his own thoroughly organized and harmonious army of sixty thousand veterans, whom he knew and trusted, and who knew and loved him, and relegated him to the position of supervisor of communications. It also sent him to the rear just when great preparations were making for an advance. But, as often happens, what seemed an adverse fate opened the door to
J. W. Buford (search for this): chapter 9.67
tanley was on the way. On reaching the point where Rutherford Creek crosses the Franklin Pike, Kimball's division was halted, by order of General Schofield, and faced to the east to cover the crossing against a possible attack from that quarter. In this position Kimball remained all day. Stanley, with the other division, pushed on to Spring Hill. Just before noon, as the head of his column was approaching that place, he met a cavalry soldier who seemed to be badly scared, who reported that Buford's division of Forrest's cavalry was approaching from the east. The troops were at once double-quicked into the town, and the leading brigade, deploying as it advanced, drove off the enemy just as they were expecting, unmolested, to occupy the place. As the other brigades came up, they also were deployed, forming nearly a semicircle,--Opdycke's brigade stretching in a thin line from the railroad station north of the village to a point some distance east, and Lane's from Opdycke's right to t
James Harrison Wilson (search for this): chapter 9.67
nce the retreat from Pulaski began, and the little army had been exposed day and night to all sorts of weather except sunshine, and had been almost continually on the move. From deserters it was learned that Hood's infantry numbered 40,000, and his cavalry, under Forrest, 10,000 or 12,000. But the Union army was slowly increasing by concentration and the arrival of recruits. It now numbered at Columbia about 23,000 infantry and some 5000 cavalry — of whom only 3500 were mounted. General James H. Wilson, who had been ordered by General Grant to report to General Sherman,--and of whom General Grant wrote, I believe he will add fifty per cent. to the effectiveness of your cavalry,--had taken command personally of all General Thomas's cavalry, which was trying to hold the fords east and west of Columbia. [See article by General Wilson, to follow.] In spite of every opposition, Forrest succeeded in placing one of his divisions on the north side of Duck River before noon of the 28th
Kenner Garrard (search for this): chapter 9.67
the Potomac, and who had recently been assigned to duty in the Department of the Cumberland. General Couch was in command of the Department of the Susquehanna from June 11th, 1863, to December 1st, 1864. On December 8th, 1864, he took command of the Second Division of the Twenty-third Corps.--editors. General Wagner was retired from command of his division, and was succeeded by General W. L. Elliott, who had been chief of cavalry on General Thomas's staff in the Atlanta campaign. General Kenner Garrard, who had commanded a cavalry division during the Atlanta campaign, was assigned to an infantry division in Smith's corps. In all these cases, except in that of General Wood succeeding to the command of the Fourth Corps, the newly assigned officers were entire strangers to the troops over whom they were placed. On the afternoon of the 14th of December General Thomas summoned his corps commanders, and, delivering to each a written order containing a detailed plan of the battle, wen
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 9.67
As they were not immediately forthcoming, General Grant had ordered General Rawlins, his chief-of-l James H. Wilson, who had been ordered by General Grant to report to General Sherman,--and of whom General Grant wrote, I believe he will add fifty per cent. to the effectiveness of your cavalry,--atched to him, on morning of the 9th: Lieutenant-General Grant expresses much dissatisfaction at youot have been gotten ready before this. If General Grant should order me to be relieved, I will subat day and a part of the next. That night General Grant notified him that the order relieving him underneath all, it — was plain to see that General Grant's dissatisfaction keenly affected him, anding his way to Nashville, with orders from General Grant that would have placed him in command of ay, did not then learn this second proof of General Grant's lack of confidence; and General Logan, ore made out at Washington, in obedience to General Grant's directions, a large part of the cavalry
George D. Wagner (search for this): chapter 9.67
, had directed General Schofield to prepare to fall back to Columbia, the two divisions of General J. D. Cox and General George D. Wagner (the latter Newton's old division) were ordered to march to Lynnville — about half-way to Columbia — on the 22d. the hills a mile or two away — the waving of signal flags and the deployment of the enemy in line of battle — caused General Wagner to send his adjutant-general, from the advanced position where his two brigades had halted, to his commanding generalhe fort the whole field of operations was plainly visible. Notwithstanding all these demonstrations, the two brigades of Wagner were left on the knoll where they had been halted, and, with scarcely an apology for works to Front view of the Gin-Houcember 1st, 1864. On December 8th, 1864, he took command of the Second Division of the Twenty-third Corps.--editors. General Wagner was retired from command of his division, and was succeeded by General W. L. Elliott, who had been chief of cavalry
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