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Platte City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
and so on to New Orleans, to co-operate with the forces that were to sweep down the Mississippi and along its borders. James H. Lane, then a member of the United States Senate, was to command that army. Owing to some difficulties, arising from misapprehension, the expedition was abandoned, and Lane took his seat in the Senate at Washington. The general plan of his treatment of the rebellion, which was rife on the Missouri border, was set forth in a few words addressed to the Trustees of Platte City, Dec. 2, 1861. concerning an outlaw named Gordon, who, with a guerrilla band, was committing depredations and outrages of every kind in that region. Hunter said, Gentlemen, I give you notice, that unless you seize and deliver the said Gordon to me at these Headquarters within ten days from this date, or drive him out of the country, I shall send a force to your city with orders to reduce it to ashes, and to burn the house of every secessionist in your county, and to carry away every neg
Warrensburg (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
d, to watch Price, who was then at Osceola with about eight thousand men, and to prevent a reconnaissance of the main column of the Nationals, he moved his whole body Dec. 16, 1861 westward and took position in the country between Clinton and Warrensburg, in Henry and Johnson counties. There were two thousand Confederates then near his lines, and against these Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, of the Seventh Missouri, was sent with a considerable cavalry force that scattered them. Having accomplished this, Brown returned to the main army, Dec. 18. which was moving on Warrensburg. Informed that a Confederate, force was on the Blackwater, at or near Milford, North of him, Pope sent Colonel Jefferson C. Davis and Major Merrill to flank them, while the main body should be in a position to give immediate aid, if necessary. Davis found them in a wooded bottom on the west side of the Blackwater, opposite the mouth of Clear Creek. His forces were on the east side, and a bridge that spanned
Laclede (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
nd pay the expenses. At about the same time General Price, who had found himself relieved from immediate danger, and encouraged by a promise of re-enforcements from Arkansas, under General McIntosh, concentrated about twelve thousand men at Springfield, where he put his army in comfortable huts, with the intention of remaining all winter, and pushed his picket-guards fifteen or twenty miles northward. This demonstration caused Halleck to concentrate his troops at Lebanon, the capital of Laclede County, northeastward of Springfield, early in February, under the chief command of General (late Colonel) S. R. Curtis. These were composed of the troops of Generals Asboth, Sigel, Davis, and Prentiss. In the midst of storms and floods, over heavy roads and swollen streams, the combined forces moved on Springfield Feb. 11, 1862. in three columns, the right under General Davis, the center under General Sigel, and the left under Colonel (soon afterward General) Carr. On the same day they m
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
and reoccupying the region which the Nationals abandoned. See page 84. We left Southern Kentucky, from the mountains to the Mississippi River, in possession of the Confederates. Polk was holding the western portion, with his Headquarters at Columbus; General Buckner, with a strongly intrenched camp at Bowling Green, was holding the center; and Generals Zollicoffer and Marshall and others were keeping watch and ward on its mountain flanks. Back of these, and between them and the region wheror it was felt that, if Fort Donelson should now fall, the Confederate cause in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri must be ruined. The first great step toward that event had been taken. The National troops were now firmly planted in the rear of Columbus, on the Mississippi, and were only about ten miles by land from the bridge over which was the railway connection between that post and Bowling Green. There was also nothing left to obstruct the passage of gunboats up the Tennessee to the fertil
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
he men of the Potomac army to stack their arms, and furl, even for a brief period, the standards they had made glorious by their manhood. Crittenden was handled without mercy by the critics. He was accused of treachery by some, and others, more charitable, charged the loss of the battle to his drunkenness. All were compelled to acknowledge a serious disaster, and from it drew the most gloomy conclusions. Their despondency was deepened by the blow received by the Confederate cause at Roanoke Island soon afterward; See page 178. and the feeling became one of almost despair, when, a few days later, events of still greater importance, and more withering to their hopes, which we are about to consider, occurred on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. These are remarkable rivers. The Tennessee rises in the rugged valleys of Southwestern Virginia, between the Alleghany and Cumberland Mountains, having tributaries coming out of North Carolina and Georgia. It sweeps in an immense cu
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
of their favorite leader, slowly making their way toward St. Louis under their temporary commander, General Hunter, while the energetic Confederate leader, General Price, was advancing, and reoccupying the region which the Nationals abandoned. See page 84. We left Southern Kentucky, from the mountains to the Mississippi River, in possession of the Confederates. Polk was holding the western portion, with his Headquarters at Columbus; General Buckner, with a strongly intrenched camp at Bowling Green, was holding the center; and Generals Zollicoffer and Marshall and others were keeping watch and ward on its mountain flanks. Back of these, and between them and the region where the rebellion had no serious opposition, was Tennessee, firmly held by the Confederates, excepting in its mountain region, where the most determined loyalty still prevailed. On the 9th of November, 1861, General Henry Wager Halleck, who had been called from California by the President to take an active part
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hnston. That officer had been an able veteran in the army of the Republic, and was then about sixty years of age. He was a Kentuckian by birth, and his sympathies were with the conspirators. He was on duty in California when the war was kindling, and was making preparations, with other conspirators there, to array that State on the side of the Confederacy, Annual Cyclopaedia for 1862. Article — A. S. Johnston. when he was superseded in command by Lieutenant-Colonel E. V. Sumner, of Massachusetts. Johnston then abandoned his flag, joined the conspirators in active rebellion, and was appointed by Jefferson Davis to the command of the Western Department, with his Headquarters at Nashville. Under the shadow of Johnston's protection, and behind the cordon of Confederate troops stretched across the State, the disloyal politicians of Kentucky proceeded to organize an independent government for the commonwealth. They met at Russellville, the capital of Logan County, in the southern
Hatch (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ad of a band of insurgents known as Texas Rangers, some of them of the worst sort, was invading the Territory. His force was formidable in numbers (twenty-three hundred) and in experience, many of them having been in successive expedition s against the Indians. Sibley issued a proclamation to the people of New Mexico, in which he denounced the National Government and demanded from the inhabitants aid for and allegiance to his marauders. Confident of success, he moved slowly, by way of Fort Thorn, and found Canby at Fort Craig, on the Rio Grande, Feb. 19, 1862. prepared to meet him. A reconnaissance satisfied him that, with his light field-pieces, an assault on the fort would be foolish. He could not retreat or remain with safety, and his military knowledge warned him that it would be very hazardous to leave a well-garrisoned fort behind him. So he forded the Rio Grande at a point below Fort Craig, and out of reach of its guns, for the purpose of drawing Canby out. In this he was
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hat portion of Kentucky lying west of the Cumberland River. He had arrived in Washington on the 5th,portion of Kentucky lying eastward of the Cumberland River, which had formed a part of Sherman's Depreatest importance, on the borders of the Cumberland River, farther westward. Zollicoffer, as we ha consider, occurred on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. These are remarkable rivers. The Tefive hundred miles from its mouth. The Cumberland River rises on the western slopes of the Cumbernnessee River, and Fort Donelson, on the, Cumberland River. The two latter were in Tennessee, not fly light draft to allow them to navigate the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, into whose waters they to Smithland, between the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers; and at the same time gun-boats were pator of East Tennessee. He had crossed the Cumberland River in force, after the battle of Mill Springf Southern Illinois, Kentucky west of the Cumberland River, and the counties of Eastern Missouri sou[2 more...]
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Tennessee River. He went up that stream cautiously, because of information that there were torpedoes in it, and on Tuesday morning, Feb. 3. at dawn, he was a few miles below Fort Henry. Andrew H. Foote. Grant's army, composed of the divisions of Generals McClernand and C. F. Smith, had, in the mean time, embarked in transports, which were convoyed by the flotilla. These landed a few miles below the fort, and soon afterward the armored gun-boats (Essex, St. Louis, Carondelet, and Cincinnati) were sent forward by Grant, with orders to move slowly and shell the woods on each side of the river, in order to discover concealed batteries, if they existed. At the same time the Conestoga and Tyler were successfully engaged, under the direction of Lieutenant Phelps, in fishing up torpedoes. Information concerning these had been given by a woman living Rear the banks of the river. The Jessie scouts, a daring corps of young men in Grant's army, went into a farm-house wherein a larg
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