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B. M. Dove (search for this): chapter 15
est request of Halleck and Grant, he felt called upon to do what he could, and at 3 P. M. on the 14th, he moved up with his fleet in the following order: iron-clads, St. Louis, (flag-ship), Lieut. Paulding; Carondelet, Corn. Walke; Louisville, Com. Dove; Pittsburg, Lieut. E. Thompson; gun-boats: Taylor, Lieut.-Com. Gwin; Conestoga, Lieut.-Com. Phelps, the two latter in the rear. After a severe fight of an hour and a half, during part of which time the iron-clads were within 400 yards of thenemy and encouraged our Army. The Carondelet anchored about three miles below the fort, at about 4 in the afternoon. Admiral Foote arrived at 11:30 P. M., with the partially iron-clad St. Louis (flag steamer, Lieut. Paulding), Louisville (Commander Dove), and Pittsburg (Lieut. Egbt. Thompson); also the wooden gun-boats Conestoga (Lieut. Phelps), and Taylor (Lieut. Gwin), and several transports with re-enforcements for General Grant of 8,000 men. About midnight Captain Walke reported in pers
Edward Morgan (search for this): chapter 15
it at all improbable that the deliberate firing of one gun-boat by experienced gunners, with heavy rifled guns of long ranges, should do as much execution in six hours, upon a battery of twelve or fifteen guns of much less range, than the firing of four such gun-boats with less experienced crews, upon these batteries at close quarters for one hour and a half, at various distances, and much less deliberation? In reference to the reconnoissance and the bombardment on the following day, Captain Morgan made the same statement to the officers on board the Carondelet on Sunday, the morning of the surrender. Newspaper correspondents on the action. The Missouri Republican of February 28th, 1862, has this report in its correspondence of the day before the battle: During the day much uneasiness was felt as to the gun-boat fleet. It was therefore with no little gratification that information was at last received about noon on Thursday, that the avant courier of the fleet, the Car
ance, but received no orders to do so. At that time Lieut.-Com. Gwin, of the Taylor, having as yet received no instructions from any quarter, and growing impatient as shot and shell fell around the vessels, sent an officer to communicate with Gen. Hurlburt and requested permission to open on the Confederates. Gen. Hurlburt expressed his thanks for this offer of support, saying that without aid he could not hold his position for an hour, and indicated the proper line of fire. At 10 o'clock theGen. Hurlburt expressed his thanks for this offer of support, saying that without aid he could not hold his position for an hour, and indicated the proper line of fire. At 10 o'clock the Taylor opened fire on the enemy, and with such effect that in a short time the Confederate batteries at that point were silenced. About 4 o'clock the Taylor dropped down to Pittsburg Landing to communicate with Gen. Grant. His reply was that Lieut. Gwin must use his own judgment in the case. Directly after the Taylor and Lexington went up in company and took up a position only three-quarters of a mile above the landing. In thirty-five minutes the enemy's batteries on the right were a
T. M. Nelson (search for this): chapter 15
. The military historian says, the gunboats gave mutual support at this moment. Boynton says, thus, on the same day, the Navy on the Western rivers received the surrender of one of the Confederate fortifications on the Mississippi, and aided very materially in saving from destruction our Army at Pittsburg Landing by repelling the last attack of the Confederates, demoralizing their army by the destructive broadsides of the steamers' heavy guns, and holding them back during the night until Nelson and Buel were ready to attack. The reader can take either version of the story that suits him best. There is a tradition in the Navy which will go down to posterity, that the Taylor and Lexington prevented part of our Army on that day from being driven into the river, and turned the enemy back when he considered that victory was in his hands. Lieut. Gwin in writing to Foote, puts it Rear-Admiral Henry Walke, (Commander of the Carondelet.) modestly thus: Your old wooden boats, I fe
Henry Walke (search for this): chapter 15
ds. Lieut. Gwin in writing to Foote, puts it Rear-Admiral Henry Walke, (Commander of the Carondelet.) modestly thus: Yo to our knowledge, he never approved or disapproved of Commander Walke's co-operation with General Grant, nor did he reply ory informed of all the circumstances, by the letters of Commander Walke, there was no explanation asked for, or made, when theThe flag-officer, however, seemed to be satisfied when Commander Walke. informed him that the Carondelet would be ready for flotilla could not assist him immediately, instructed Commander Walke to proceed without delay to commence the attack on Forred to, preceding the battle of Fort Donelson. From Commander Walke to Flag-officer Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondeletso. Most respectfully and truly, Your ob't servant, H. Walke, Commander U. S. N. To Flag-officer A. H. Foote, U. S. N.ing. I am, sir, most respectfully, Your ob't servant, H. Walke. Commander U. S. Navy. Flag-officer A. H. Foote, Commandi
sion in his favor on February 13th, as narrated in the following report of Commander Walke to Admiral Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Near Fort Donelson, Cumive, and that three of them failed to obey the orders of General Grant and Commander Walke to accompany the Carondelet on this reconnoissance; but it gives an unfavoout noon on Thursday, that the avant courier of the fleet, the Carondelet, Commander Walke, had arrived below the fort. In the afternoon the report of her guns was ed with cheer upon cheer by the troops encircling the beleaguered fort. Commander Walke's operations this afternoon, although partaking more of the nature of a rensports with re-enforcements for General Grant of 8,000 men. About midnight Captain Walke reported in person to the flag-officer. After the battle of Fort Donelsoreturned to Cairo for repairs. Arriving there on the morning of the 17th, Commander Walke reported to the flag-officer the success of our arms, and the surrender of
E. Thompson (search for this): chapter 15
:15 P. M., she commenced firing again upon the fort, and kept up a brisk fire until she had expended all or nearly all of her long-range shell, when at dusk she retired from the contest, having annoyed the enemy and encouraged our Army. The Carondelet anchored about three miles below the fort, at about 4 in the afternoon. Admiral Foote arrived at 11:30 P. M., with the partially iron-clad St. Louis (flag steamer, Lieut. Paulding), Louisville (Commander Dove), and Pittsburg (Lieut. Egbt. Thompson); also the wooden gun-boats Conestoga (Lieut. Phelps), and Taylor (Lieut. Gwin), and several transports with re-enforcements for General Grant of 8,000 men. About midnight Captain Walke reported in person to the flag-officer. After the battle of Fort Donelson. Three gun boats remained until after the surrender of Fort Donelson, which took place on Sunday, February 16th, when they steamed up the river above the fort to Dover. There our officers and men met in good cheer. Our usual di
Henry A. Walke (search for this): chapter 15
e Fort. the gun-boats are crippled and withdraw. Flag-officer Foote wounded. gallantry of Captain Walke. losses. General Grant's victory. results. gunboats repair to Cairo. Grant prepares to in the following order: iron-clads, St. Louis, (flag-ship), Lieut. Paulding; Carondelet, Corn. Walke; Louisville, Com. Dove; Pittsburg, Lieut. E. Thompson; gun-boats: Taylor, Lieut.-Com. Gwin; Coney. Nothing is said in official reports or general orders about the gallant attack made by Captain Walke in the Carondelet. On the morning of the 13th (before Foote had arrived), General Grant requested Captain Walke to take a position and throw shells into the fort in order to create a diversion, which he hoped to be able to take advantage of. Captain Walke immediately complied with thiCaptain Walke immediately complied with this request, and threw 139 15-second and 10-second shells into the enemy's works, receiving in return a fire from all the batteries. The Carondelet was only struck twice, however, as most of the proje
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 15
15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. Grant's message to Halleck. the Army in front of Donelson. the gun-boats push up the Tennessee river. atory orders, &C. On the 8th of February, 1862, Gen. Grant telegraphed to Gen. Halleck: Fort Henry is ours; the gunboats silenced the batteries before the investmert Donelson. Reinforcements were rapidly coming in from various quarters, and Halleck, who up to this time had thrown every objection in the way of the expedition, t to him. Grant did not, however, wait for these re-enforcements, but while Halleck was writing about picks and shovels he informed Foote that he was only waitingfficiently strong to make an attack on the fort; but at the earnest request of Halleck and Grant, he felt called upon to do what he could, and at 3 P. M. on the 14thson. After the capture of Fort Henry, Flag-officer Foote was requested by Generals Halleck and Grant to co-operate with the latter in an attack on Fort Donelson, sit
February 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 15
the enemy. General Grant, being under the impression at least that Foote's flotilla could not assist him immediately, instructed Commander Walke to proceed without delay to commence the attack on Fort Donelson in connection with our Army before the enemy could receive re-enforcements or could strengthen his position. The following is the letter referred to, preceding the battle of Fort Donelson. From Commander Walke to Flag-officer Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Paducah, Feb. 10th, 1862. Sir:--I received instructions from General Grant this evening, to proceed with this vessel to Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland river, to co-operate with our Army in that vicinity. I expect to meet you before I reach there. The Alps will take me in tow. I will call at this place. General Grant will send the Taylor, Lexington, and Conestoga after me. We heard that you were on your way to Fort Donelson, but I hear no tidings of you here tonight. The Taylor has just returned fr
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