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Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 28
any dangerous service,--only one steamer was sunk by the enemy's shot. A sufficient number of gun boats had been left at the mouth of the Yazoo River to take care of the upper Mississippi, and to look out for two formidable rams that were building at Yazoo City, forty miles from the mouth of the river. Sherman remained with his division at Young's Point, ready to make another attack from the Yazoo if opportunity offered, and also to protect the supplies at Milliken's Bend from General Sterling Price, who with a large Confederate force was encamped some thirty miles away on the west bank of the Mississippi. The Mississippi Marine Brigade, consisting of two thousand men, under Brigadier-General Alfred Ellet, in six or seven large steamers, was left there. These flying troops were attached to the Navy. Every precaution had been taken to prevent a surprise from the Confederates, or any attempt on their part to fortify the river banks again in the absence of the Army. General
J. Pemberton (search for this): chapter 28
ond. General Steele had been sent up to the Steele's Bayou region to destroy all the provisions in that quarter, and Pemberton knew that if Grant's Army once got below Vicksburg it would eat up everything in the way of food between Warrenton and e; he outgeneraled the Confederates, fought battle after battle and finally reached the rear of Vicksburg, shutting General Pemberton inside the fortifications and causing General Joseph E. Johnston to evacuate Jackson and retreat. Grant's conducfederates, who had seen so many nondescripts pass Vicksburg that they hardly knew a gun-boat from a transport. While Pemberton was making his preparations to meet Grant's Army on Big Black River, he received a dispatch informing him that Haines' additional heavy guns had been placed in position. This feint against Haines' Bluff continued for several days, and Pemberton was obliged, in answer to solicitations, to send re-inforcements, thus weakening his Army below. Ox teams were observe
William R. Hoel (search for this): chapter 28
th; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel; Carondelet. Lieutenant-Commander J. McL. Murphy, and Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk. The tug Ivy washad been signalled to double up on Bald Head, the Lafayette to resume her old position, and the Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, arrived opportunely to take the Benton's place. During the time the latter vessel was out of action--twenty-five mmes, but only five shots did any serious damage. She had only one officer wounded. The Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant-Commander Hoel, was struck in the hull thirty-five times, and had six killed and thirteen wounded. The other vessels, althohe highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Commanding Hoel and Wilson, some of whom had already distinguished themselves on the upper Mississippi. The remarks on this
E. G. Parrott (search for this): chapter 28
ly one gun could be fired and that could not be trained, owing to the destruction of its carriage. Some of the guns in the lower batteries were still intact, and these opened on the fleet. In the evening, the guns were all dismounted by the sailors and laid along the levee, where they could be shipped to Cairo. The following is a copy of a report made by T. M. Farrell, U. S. N., May, 1863: These batteries mounted one 100-pounder, two 64-pounders, two 7-inch rifles, one 30-pounder Parrott, two 30-pounder Parrotts in battery, two 20-pounder Parrotts in main magazine, three 10-pounder Parrotts on the hills. Batteries engaged by the gun-boats for five hours and thirty-five minutes, the lower battery silenced in three hours, the upper battery silenced with the exception of one gun. The Lafayette laid opposite this battery and kept the people from working until dark, when it was partially repaired. The defences were all earthworks. In addition to the above, four or five sm
Charles S. Kendrick (search for this): chapter 28
ng his Army below. Ox teams were observed hauling heavy guns to mount at Haines' Bluff, to check the advance of the Federal forces, showing that the enemy was exerting all his energy to strengthen the threatened position. During this movement, the DeKalb, while temporarily dropping out of action was attacked by sharpshooters from some buildings on the eastern bank. Lieutenant-Commander Walker immediately ran the vessel into the bank and landed twenty-five men under command of Acting-Master C. S. Kendrick, who dislodged the enemy and chased them into the swamp, killing one officer and three privates, and taking a lieutenant of the Third Louisiana Infantry prisoner. This officer was captured in a hand-to-hand fight by Mr. Kendrick, who knocked him down with a pistol. In two days firing, the DeKalb expended two hundred rounds of shot and shells, did not suffer materially in her hull, and had only one casualty. The Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander Ramsay, had an opportunity of showi
Alexander M. Grant (search for this): chapter 28
ful examination of the left bank of the river, Grant decided to push on to Grand Gulf, a long and t equal to the occasion, and this desire of General Grant to show McClernand that he was anxious to state of affairs and begged him to induce General Grant to come to the front and take charge in pehat their shot would reach the enemy. After Grant had got his Army in motion part of McClernand'o keep the enemy out of the works. When General Grant went on board the flag-ship, he decided thng, although no excuse was needed. It was General Grant's opinion that it would be wiser to land tas ample to meet all his requirements. Here Grant started on that remarkable march against an enoint, he started with his division to join General Grant, crossing the river at Grand Gulf and overat the mercy of the Federal Army. After General Grant and his troops landed at Bruensburg, Admirned to Grand Gulf, where it was found that General Grant had moved his Army towards Vicksburg. T[16 more...]
John G. Walker (search for this): chapter 28
el, carpenter shop, store vessel, powder vessel and hospital vessel. These were simply river steamers painted black. The naval forces were led by Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese in the Black Hawk and comprised the Baron DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander John G. Walker, Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsay, Taylor. Lieutenant-Commander Prichett, Signal, Romeo, Linden and Petrel with three 13-inch mortars. The naval demonstration was really a fine one, calculated to impress the Confederating that the enemy was exerting all his energy to strengthen the threatened position. During this movement, the DeKalb, while temporarily dropping out of action was attacked by sharpshooters from some buildings on the eastern bank. Lieutenant-Commander Walker immediately ran the vessel into the bank and landed twenty-five men under command of Acting-Master C. S. Kendrick, who dislodged the enemy and chased them into the swamp, killing one officer and three privates, and taking a lieutenant
J. W. Shirk (search for this): chapter 28
f the enemy, and, in consequence, the list of killed and wounded in the squadron was large. The Tuscumbia, on which vessel great reliance was placed to resist heavy shot, proved herself the weakest iron-clad in the squadron, although Lieutenant-Commander Shirk stood up to his work manfully. In the beginning of the engagement, a rifle shell struck the outer edge of the shutter of the midship port — she fought three 11-inch guns in the bow — opened the port and entered the casemate, killing siore graves than that were counted. The enemy had many wounded, but the number was not mentioned in the returns. Rear-Admiral Porter, in his report, speaks in the highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Commanding Hoel and Wilson, some of whom had already distinguished themselves on the upper Mississippi. The remarks on this battle of Grand Gulf by military historians show how reluctant they are to give the Na
John M. Brooke (search for this): chapter 28
called Bald Head, was on a bold bluff promontory at a bend in the river commanding a view for miles up and down the Mississippi. The current of the river, which ran here five miles an hour with innumerable eddies, had cut away the shore until beneath the fort was a perpendicular wall more than eighty feet in height, while in the rear hills rising three hundred and fifty feet above the river were dotted with field works to protect the flanks of Bald Head, which fort mounted four heavy guns, Brooke rifles and 8-inch Columbiads. In front of this the river formed a large circular bay or gulf from which the place took its name. Black River emptied into the gulf and the approach to it was commanded by two 8-inch Columbiads. The lower forts were half a mile below Bald Head, and were connected with the latter by intrenchments by which troops could pass under cover from one fort to another. The lower batteries mounted nine heavy guns situated on the brow of a hill eight hundred yards fr
Henry C. Wade (search for this): chapter 28
bank at Hard Times. Then came the melancholy duty of burying the dead, who were followed mournfully to their graves by their messmates and friends. Three hours afterwards the squadron got underway and again attacked the batteries, while the transports all passed in safety below Hard Times. Some of the Confederate gunners fired at the gun-boats but did no damage. During the whole engagement the Confederates stood to their guns manfully, and certainly pointed them to some purpose. Colonel Wade, the commanding officer at Bald Head, was killed; his chief-of-staff also, and eleven men were reported killed by the Confederates, although more graves than that were counted. The enemy had many wounded, but the number was not mentioned in the returns. Rear-Admiral Porter, in his report, speaks in the highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Commanding Hoel and Wilson, some of whom had already distinguishe
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