hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 401 total hits in 68 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 28
y-two thousand men with four days rations, and without transportation determined to live upon the enemy, as he was satisfied the supply of provisions in the district was ample to meet all his requirements. Here Grant started on that remarkable march against an enemy who outnumbered numbered his forces two to one; he outgeneraled the Confederates, fought battle after battle and finally reached the rear of Vicksburg, shutting General Pemberton inside the fortifications and causing General Joseph E. Johnston to evacuate Jackson and retreat. Grant's conduct of this campaign forms the brightest chapter in his military record and can only be appreciated by those who know the difficulties with which he had to contend, and particularly the nature of the country through which he had to march his Army. General Grant had made arrangements for Sherman's division to make a feint up Yazoo River the same day the gun-boats attacked Grand Gulf. Accordingly, on that day Sherman moved up the Ya
Elias K. Owen (search for this): chapter 28
t the enemy's works fifty yards apart. Most of the vessels had a coal barge lashed to them on the side away from the enemy, and the wooden gun-boat General Price, was lashed to the off side of the iron-clad Lafayette. When all was ready the signal was made to get under way and the squadron started in the following order: Benton (flag-ship) Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer; Lafayette, Commander Henry Walke; General Price, Lieutenant-Commander Selim Woodworth; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel; Carondelet. Lieutenant-Commander J. McL. Murphy, and Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk. The tug Ivy was lashed to the Benton, three army transports were in the rear and the Tuscumbia was at the end of the line to take care of them. The Benton, passed the first battery without receiving a shot, but as she came up with the second. the railroad station on the right bank of the rive
E. K. Owen (search for this): chapter 28
were counted. The enemy had many wounded, but the number was not mentioned in the returns. Rear-Admiral Porter, in his report, speaks in the highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Commanding Hoel and Wilson, some of whom had already distinguished themselves on the upper Mississippi. The remarks on this battle of Grand Gulf by military historians show how reluctant they are to give the Navy credit. The follohe rebels and shifted about from place to place. Admiral Farragut was still at the mouth of Red River in the flag-ship Hartford, where he had remained ever since he had made the passage by Port Hudson, and Admiral Porter having left Lieutenant-Commander Owen in charge at Grand Gulf with the Louisville and Tuscumbia, proceeded down the river to meet Farragut and relieve him of the command of that part of the river. On the 3d of May, 1863, Admiral Porter reached the mouth of Red River and
G. E. McPherson (search for this): chapter 28
ar of Jackson, would have been kept open by the gun-boats; and the main Army instead of having to land at Bruensburg, eight or ten miles below Grand Gulf, could have disembarked at the latter point and marched to the rear of Vicksburg by favorable roads. Instead of carrying out his instructions, McClernand advanced only to Perkins' Landing, where he pitched his tents (although he had been directed to leave these behind on account of the difficulties of transportation), and called upon General McPherson for rations, of which he had failed to provide himself a sufficient supply. Perkins' Landing seemed to have such a fascination for McClernand that he remained there until Grant ordered him to move on. Admiral Porter proceeded in the wooden gun-boat General Price to reconnoitre Grand Gulf,and ascertained that large numbers of troops were engaged in constructing extensive fortifications. Some guns were already mounted and others lying on the ground. The Price had but two guns and
Henry Walke (search for this): chapter 28
to their guns. so-called history. Grant's brightest chapter. attack on Haines' Bluff. Captain Walke captures sharpshooters. Grand Gulf captured. Porter confers with Farragut. up the Red Riv the following order: Benton (flag-ship) Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer; Lafayette, Commander Henry Walke; General Price, Lieutenant-Commander Selim Woodworth; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander Eosition to keep the enemy from reoccupying the works and repairing damages. This duty Commander Walke effectually performed, firing a shell every five minutes into the works until darkness set in. d severely wounding the pilot, nine men were killed and nineteen wounded. The Lafayette, Commander Walke, proved herself an excellent fighting vessel. She was struck by cannon shot forty-five timioned in the returns. Rear-Admiral Porter, in his report, speaks in the highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Comm
J. P. Jackson (search for this): chapter 28
o Grand Gulf, a long and tedious march. General McClernand had been given the advance to satisfy his ambition, but he was not equal to the occasion, and this desire of General Grant to show McClernand that he was anxious to give him an opportunity for distinction, might have hazarded the success of the campaign. Had McClernand pushed on at once with the Navy to back him Grand Gulf and its batteries would have easily fallen into Federal hands; Big Black River, which led up to the rear of Jackson, would have been kept open by the gun-boats; and the main Army instead of having to land at Bruensburg, eight or ten miles below Grand Gulf, could have disembarked at the latter point and marched to the rear of Vicksburg by favorable roads. Instead of carrying out his instructions, McClernand advanced only to Perkins' Landing, where he pitched his tents (although he had been directed to leave these behind on account of the difficulties of transportation), and called upon General McPherson
James W. Shirk (search for this): chapter 28
off side of the iron-clad Lafayette. When all was ready the signal was made to get under way and the squadron started in the following order: Benton (flag-ship) Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer; Lafayette, Commander Henry Walke; General Price, Lieutenant-Commander Selim Woodworth; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel; Carondelet. Lieutenant-Commander J. McL. Murphy, and Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk. The tug Ivy was lashed to the Benton, three army transports were in the rear and the Tuscumbia was at the end of the line to take care of them. The Benton, passed the first battery without receiving a shot, but as she came up with the second. the railroad station on the right bank of the river was set on fire, and tar barrels were lighted all along the Vicksburg shore, illuminating the river and showing every object as plainly as if it was daylight. Then the enemy opened
McClernand (search for this): chapter 28
ies run. the fleet anchors below the city. McClernand confronted with Quaker guns. Grant pushes front of the batteries. insubordination of McClernand. Grand Gulf described. the gunboats commen the advanced division of the Army under General McClernand. The plantation at this place was own some four hundred men, the advance guard of McClernand's division, were found behind intrenchments e hazarded the success of the campaign. Had McClernand pushed on at once with the Navy to back him . Instead of carrying out his instructions, McClernand advanced only to Perkins' Landing, where he anding seemed to have such a fascination for McClernand that he remained there until Grant ordered hut no heed was given to the application; for McClernand, wrapped in his dignity, scorned all advice.e assumed command of the advance in spite of McClernand's objections, which were manifested in such ter Grant had got his Army in motion part of McClernand's division was embarked on transports, the r[6 more...]
nd the wooden gun-boat General Price, was lashed to the off side of the iron-clad Lafayette. When all was ready the signal was made to get under way and the squadron started in the following order: Benton (flag-ship) Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer; Lafayette, Commander Henry Walke; General Price, Lieutenant-Commander Selim Woodworth; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel; Carondelet. Lieutenant-Commander J. McL. Murphy, and Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk. The tug Ivy was lashed to the Benton, three army transports were in the rear and the Tuscumbia was at the end of the line to take care of them. The Benton, passed the first battery without receiving a shot, but as she came up with the second. the railroad station on the right bank of the river was set on fire, and tar barrels were lighted all along the Vicksburg shore, illuminating the river and showing every object a
Charles F. Williams (search for this): chapter 28
hip Benton, and the Tuscumbia were doing their best to silence the upper battery, getting close under the guns and endeavoring to knock Batteries at Grand Gulf captured by the U. S. Mississippi Squadron, May 3, 1863. off their muzzles, when they were run out to fire. The current was so strong, however, that it was impossible to keep the two vessels in position and they sheered about very much. In one of these sheers, a shot entered the Benton's pilot house, disabled the wheel and cut Pilot Williams' foot nearly off. Though the brave pilot never left his post it was impossible to manage the vessel and she was accordingly run into the bank to repair damages. The gun-boats at the lower batteries had been signalled to double up on Bald Head, the Lafayette to resume her old position, and the Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, arrived opportunely to take the Benton's place. During the time the latter vessel was out of action--twenty-five minutes--the Pittsburg lost six killed and
1 2 3 4 5 6 7