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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. Search the whole document.

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Schofield (search for this): chapter 7
ling sound in our rear, and we folded up our tents, as usual, under strict orders to make no noise, and, under cover of darkness, marched to and across the Chattahoochee, upon the flat plains of Georgia. After our passage of this river on the night of the 9th of July, Sherman moved rapidly to the eastward and across the Chattahoochee, some distance above Peach Tree creek. He formed a line parallel to this creek, with his right on the river, and approached Atlanta from the north, whilst Schofield and McPherson, on the left, marched rapidly in the direction of Decatur to destroy the railroad to Augusta. General Johnston thus relates the sequel: Johnston's Narrative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had crossed the Chattahoochee. * * * The following telegram was received from General Cooper, dated July 17th: Lieutenant General J. B. Hood has been commissioned to the temporary rank of General, under the late law
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 7
w Mountain retreat across the Chattahoochee Johnston relieved from command. General Johnston, tGeneral Johnston, touching the operations of his Army near New Hope Church says : Johnston's Narrative, pages 328, ight of the 28th of May from the position General Johnston erroneously assigns General Polk during tr duty with the Army of the West. When General Johnston said as usual, I suggested that we attackve undergone so complete — a change under General Johnston, during the last year of the war. In trutne word which would convey a suspicion of General Johnston's contemplated retreat to Macon. Short P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louisll three unite in an effort to prevail on General Johnston to withhold the order, and retain commandd requesting him to recall the order removing Johnston, at least until the fate of Atlanta should beeipt of the above telegram, I returned to General Johnston's room, alone, and urged him, for the goo[20 more...]
John Bell Hood (search for this): chapter 7
Johnston's Narrative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had crossed the Chattahoochee. * * * The following telegram was received from General Cooper, dated July 17th: Lieutenant General J. B. Hood has been commissioned to the temporary rank of General, under the late law of Congress. I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, as you have failed to arrest the advance of the enemy to the vicinity of Atlanta, far iostponed, at least till the fate of Atlanta was decided. The, following extract from a letter of Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. General J. B. Hood. my Dear General:--Your letter of the 25th ultimo was received some days since, and I avail myself of the first opportunity to answer it. You ask me to send you a statement setting forth the facts as you (I) understand them, of the ci
Joseph Wheeler (search for this): chapter 7
his division, extending to the right, where Major General Wheeler, with his cavalry, dismounted, was engaging ued with great determination upon both Cleburne and Wheeler until after'night, but every attempt to break their6th, 27th and 28th, I received information from General Wheeler's cavalry stationed on Cleburne's right, just aing to march that night, upon the above report from Wheeler's cavalry, and attack the left flank of the enemy,-night and took up my line of march with guides from Wheeler's cavalry. Just about dawn, as we were approachingrom a letter dated May 22d, I874, received from General Wheeler, General Johnston's Chief of Cavalry, will showve a strong impression that the officer to whom General Wheeler refers was the gallant General Kelly, who was ative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had cro during the day. Intelligence soon came from Major General Wheeler, that the Federal Army was marching toward A
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 7
iving their close and accurate fire with the fortitude always exhibited by General Sherman's troops in the actions of this campaign. * * * The contest of the main boenant General Polk's and my urgent recommendation that he turn upon and attack Sherman at Adairsville, just before he placed his Army upon the untenable ridge in rearmy had remained on the defensive about thirty days at Kennesaw Mountain, when Sherman resorted to a ruse he had learned from experience would prove effective: he sef Georgia. After our passage of this river on the night of the 9th of July, Sherman moved rapidly to the eastward and across the Chattahoochee, some distance abov for Atlanta; at the same time I directed his attention to the approach of General Sherman, and alleged that the enemy, unless checked, would in a few days capture try, to pocket the correspondence, remain in command, and fight for Atlanta, as Sherman was at the very gates of the city. To this my second appeal he made about the
S. Cooper (search for this): chapter 7
ree creek. He formed a line parallel to this creek, with his right on the river, and approached Atlanta from the north, whilst Schofield and McPherson, on the left, marched rapidly in the direction of Decatur to destroy the railroad to Augusta. General Johnston thus relates the sequel: Johnston's Narrative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had crossed the Chattahoochee. * * * The following telegram was received from General Cooper, dated July 17th: Lieutenant General J. B. Hood has been commissioned to the temporary rank of General, under the late law of Congress. I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, as you have failed to arrest the advance of the enemy to the vicinity of Atlanta, far in the interior of Georgia, and express no confidence that you can defeat or repel him, you are hereby relieved. from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, which you will immediately turn over t
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 7
ositions should not be attacked, such as the one occupied by the enemy after recrossing Little Pumpkinvine creek. However, had General Johnston given me orders to attack at all hazard, I would have done so. It is true I went into battle under protest at Gettysburg, because I desired to turn Round Top Mountain; but, notwithstanding, I was true in every sense of the word to the orders of my commander till, wounded, I was borne from the field. During three yearsservice, under Generals Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet, I was never charged with being too late in any of the many battles in which I was engaged, before reporting for duty with the Army of the West. When General Johnston said as usual, I suggested that we attack the left flank of the enemy. I presume he had in remembrance Lieutenant General Polk's and my urgent recommendation that he turn upon and attack Sherman at Adairsville, just before he placed his Army upon the untenable ridge in rear of Cassville, with women and chil
ia, and express no confidence that you can defeat or repel him, you are hereby relieved. from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, which you will immediately turn over to General Hood. * * * General Hood came to my quarters early in the morning of the i8th, and remained there during the day. Intelligence soon came from Major General Wheeler, that the Federal Army was marching toward Atlanta, and, at General Hood's earnest request, I continued to give orders through Brigadier General Mackall, Chief of Staff, until sunset. About 11 o'clock, on the night of the 17th, I received a telegram from the War Office, directing me to assume command of the Army. This totally unexpected order so astounded me, and overwhelmed me with sense of the responsibility thereto attached, that I remained in deep thought throughout the night. Before daybreak I started for General Johnston's headquarters, a short distance from which I met Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart, one of my divisi
, pages 328, 329, 330. We found, next morning, that the Federal line extended much further to our right than it had done the day before. Polk's Corps was transferred to the right of Hood's. * * * The Federal troops extended their entrenched lines so rapidly to their left, that it was found necessary in the morning of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's Division of Hardee's Corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's Cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand (1000) men; occupied the interval, of half-a-mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkinvine creek. * * * * Between 5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon, Kelly's skirmishers were driven in by a body of Federal cavalry, whose advance was supported by the Fourth Corps. * * * * As soon as the noise of this contest revealed to Major General Cleburne the manoeuvre to turn his right, he brought the right brigade of his second line, Granberry's, t
A. P. Stewart (search for this): chapter 7
ow; the President had seen fit to relieve him. I then insisted he should pocket that dispatch, leave me in command of my corps, and fight the battle for Atlanta; at the same time I directed his attention to the approach of General Sherman, and alleged that the enemy, unless checked, would in a few days capture the city. To this appeal, he replied that the President had seen fit to relieve him, and it would have so to be, unless the order was countermanded. Lieutenant Generals Hardee and Stewart then joined me in a telegram to the President, requesting that the order for his removal be postponed, at least till the fate of Atlanta was decided. The, following extract from a letter of Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. General J. B. Hood. my Dear General:--Your letter of the 25th ultimo was received some days since, and I avail myself of the first opportunity to answer it.
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