hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 606 8 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 489 3 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 400 0 Browse Search
W. J. Hardee 312 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 250 0 Browse Search
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 238 4 Browse Search
Alexander P. Stewart 226 4 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 204 10 Browse Search
S. D. Lee 190 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 184 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. Search the whole document.

Found 252 total hits in 56 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
the Federal line extended much further to our right than it had done the day before. Polk's Corps was transferred to the right of Hood's. * * * The Federal troops extended their entrenched lines so rapidly to their left, that it was found necessary in the morning of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's Division of Hardee's Corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's Cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand (1000) men; occupied the interval, of half-a-mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkinvine creek. * * * * Between 5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon, Kelly's skirmishers were driven in by a body of Federal cavalry, whose advance was supported by the Fourth Corps. * * * * As soon as the noise of this contest revealed to Major General Cleburne the manoeuvre to turn his right, he brought the right brigade of his second line, Granberry's, to Kelly's support, by forming it on the right of his firs
nant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. General J. B. Hood. my Dear General:--Your letter of the 25th ultimo was received some days since, and I avail myself of the first opportunity to answer it. You ask me to send you a statement setting forth the facts as you (I) understand them, of the circumstances attending the removal of General J. E. Johnston from the command of our Army in Georgia, in 1864, and my appointment to succeed him. It gives me pleasure to comply with your request. * * * Monday morning,(July i8th,)you will remember we met about sunrise in the road near Johnston's headquarters; and I then informed you of the object of seeking an interview, and that was that we should all three unite in an effort to prevail on General Johnston to withhold the order, and retain command of the Army until the impending battle should have been fought. I can bear witness to the readiness wit
July 18th (search for this): chapter 7
ston, at least until the fate of Atlanta should be decided. That was the substance; I cannot remember the language. An answer was received that afternoon from the President, declining to comply with our request or suggestion, on the ground that the order having been issued, it would do more harm than good to recall or suspend it. * * * Very sincerely yours, Alex. P. Stewart, Late Lieutenant General C. S. Army. The President's answer to our telegram was as follows: Richmond, July 18th, I864. to Generals Hood, Hardee and Stewart. Your telegram of this date received. A change of commanders, under existing circumstances, was regarded as so objectionable that I only accepted it as the alternative of continuing a policy which has proven disastrous. Reluctance to make the change induced me to send a telegram of inquiry to the Commanding General on the i6th inst. His reply but confirmed previous apprehensions. There can be but one question which you and I can entertain
July 17th (search for this): chapter 7
d a line parallel to this creek, with his right on the river, and approached Atlanta from the north, whilst Schofield and McPherson, on the left, marched rapidly in the direction of Decatur to destroy the railroad to Augusta. General Johnston thus relates the sequel: Johnston's Narrative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had crossed the Chattahoochee. * * * The following telegram was received from General Cooper, dated July 17th: Lieutenant General J. B. Hood has been commissioned to the temporary rank of General, under the late law of Congress. I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, as you have failed to arrest the advance of the enemy to the vicinity of Atlanta, far in the interior of Georgia, and express no confidence that you can defeat or repel him, you are hereby relieved. from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, which you will immediately turn over to General Hood. * *
August 7th, 1872 AD (search for this): chapter 7
this appeal, he replied that the President had seen fit to relieve him, and it would have so to be, unless the order was countermanded. Lieutenant Generals Hardee and Stewart then joined me in a telegram to the President, requesting that the order for his removal be postponed, at least till the fate of Atlanta was decided. The, following extract from a letter of Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. General J. B. Hood. my Dear General:--Your letter of the 25th ultimo was received some days since, and I avail myself of the first opportunity to answer it. You ask me to send you a statement setting forth the facts as you (I) understand them, of the circumstances attending the removal of General J. E. Johnston from the command of our Army in Georgia, in 1864, and my appointment to succeed him. It gives me pleasure to comply with your request. * * * Monday morning,(July i8th,)you
fter his aide-de-camp's return. If the attack had been expedient when Lieutenant General Hood's message was dispatched, the resulting delay, by enabling the enemy to reinforce the threatened point and complete the entrenchments began, made it no longer so. He was therefore recalled. Before I withdrew from the right of the Army which rested on Little Pumpkin-vine creek, with Cleburne's Division still on my extreme right and under my orders--i. e., before I withdrew on the night of the 28th of May from the position General Johnston erroneously assigns General Polk during the 26th, 27th and 28th, I received information from General Wheeler's cavalry stationed on Cleburne's right, just across Little Pumpkin-vine creek, that the enemy had its left flank beyond this stream, in a position which was exposed by reason of the difficulty of passage back to the main body of their Army; and that if I could withdraw that night, the 28th, and get in position by early morning, I might attack thi
1 2 3 4 5 6