hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,170 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 573 1 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 566 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 532 0 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 482 0 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 470 8 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 449 3 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 405 1 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 340 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 324 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,384 total hits in 171 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Highland County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
red, at such a moment, to surrender its principle, its consistency, its manhood, on peril of National disruption and overthrow. There was no concession from the other side — no real compromise-but a simple, naked exaction that the Republicans should stultify and disgrace themselves, by admitting that they were fundamentally wrong, and that, instead of electing their President,they should have been defeated. The Cincinnati Enquirer of January 15, 1861, has a letter from A Citizen of Highland County, which puts the case squarely thus: There is only one possible remedy which can save the country,and restore harmony and peace; and that is a total abandonment of the dogmas of Lincoln, and the adoption of another and opposite object- the recognition of the equality of all the States in the territories of the United States, and the strict enforcement of all the laws protecting and securing slave property under the Constitution. This principle is recognized in the proposition of Sen
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ny resistance to their purpose that might be offered. The Albany Argus of Nov. 12, 1860, said: Should secession from the Union be actually attempted by South Carolina alone, or in connection with other States, it will be a most important question for the present and next Administration, how it shall be treated. Shall it bef secession, we believe that, as a matter of practical administration, neither Mr. Buchanan nor Mr. Lincoln will employ force against the seceding States. If South Carolina, or any other State, through a convention of her people, shall formally separate herself from the Union, probably both the present and the next Executive willwer to a Union letter from Rev. Lewis P. Clover, a Democrat of Springfield, Ill., had said: I now consider the overthrow of the Union absolutely certain. South Carolina will secede; and the chain, once broken, is not very likely to be reunited. * * * Unless something shall be speedily done to quiet the apprehensions of the So
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 25
nvention reached Washington, they were hailed with undisguised exultation by the Secessionists still lingering in the halls of Congress; one of whom said to him triumphantly, If your President should attempt coercion, he will have more opposition at the North than he can overcome. The New York Herald of November 9th--the third day after that of the Presidential election — in its leading editorial, had said: For far less than this [the election of Lincoln], our fathers seceded from Great Britain; and they left revolution organized in every State, to act whenever it is demanded by public opinion. The confederation is held together only by public opinion. Each State is organized as a complete government, holding the purse and wielding the sword, possessing the right to break the tie of the confederation as a nation might break a treaty, and repel coercion as a nation might repel invasion. * * * Coercion, if it were possible, is out of the question. The Charleston Courier of N
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
nless ample guarantees were accorded them that Kansas should thenceforth be regarded and treated as ged that the question of Freedom or Slavery in Kansas should be submitted to a direct popular vote, nnsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, Kansas-13. Mr. Seddon's project, excluding that pving his colleagues live to five. Indiana, and Kansas were equally divided, and so cast no vote. Ths adopted by the following vote — New York and Kansas not voting, because equally divided: Ays--as carried, by the following vote-New York and Kansas still equally divided: Ays--Connecticut, Dennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Kansas-16. Noes-Iowa, Maine,Massachusetts, North C, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Kansas-11. Noes--Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Kansas-12. Noes-Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Missouriucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have approved what is herewith submit[3 more...]
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
aryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. Ex-President John Tyler, of Vew Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee-9. Noes--Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, MassacNew Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,Tennessee,Virginia-11. Noes--Connecticut, Illinois, Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia-12. Noes-Connecticut, Indiana, Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia-15. Noes--Iowa, Maine,ew Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Kansas-11. Noes--Connecticut, Indiana, IHampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Kansas-12. Noes-Connecticut, Iowa, Maine Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia--10. Noes-Connecticut, Illinoisr, Grimes, Gwin, Harlan, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Mason, Morrill, Nicholson,rs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--M[9 more...]
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsyll; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield; Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; Connecticut, Roger S. BaldwinJersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, Kansas-13. Mr. Seew York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Kansas--16. Mr. Jaew York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont-14. Mr. Tuck's proposition, co, Maryland, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee-9. Noes--Connecticut, Iowa, M, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,Tennessee,Virginia-11. Noes--Connecticutew York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Kansas-16. Noes-Iowine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl be found on page 205. But Gov. Anthony, of Rhode Island, formally offered, See page 381. in the [7 more...]
Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ent to be numbered among those who introduced new Slave Power into the Union. I will do all in my power to prevent it. Mr. Clay's deliberate and emphatic declaration that he would never consent nor be constrained to vote for the positive introduction of Slavery either south or north of that line (36° 30′), will be found on page 205. But Gov. Anthony, of Rhode Island, formally offered, See page 381. in the Senate, to unite in the immediate admission of New Mexico (which then included Arizona) as a State, under such Constitution as her people should see fit to frame and adopt-New Mexico being at that moment a Slave Territory by act of her Legislature — to say nothing of the Dred Scott decision. That would have given the South a firm hold on nearly every acre of our present territory whereon she could rationally hope ever to plant Slavery--provided the people of New Mexico should see fit to ingraft Slavery on their State, as they seemed, under Democratic training, to have done o
Free (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
an we are? Will they admit that they have interests antagonistic to those of the whole commonwealth? Are they making sacrifices, when they do that which is required by the common welfare? Had New England and some other of the Fremont States revolted, or threatened to revolt, after the election of 1856, proclaiming that they would never recognize nor obey Mr. Buchanan as President, unless ample guarantees were accorded them that Kansas should thenceforth be regarded and treated as a Free Territory or State, would any prominent Democrat have thus insisted that this demand should be complied with Would he have urged that the question of Freedom or Slavery in Kansas should be submitted to a direct popular vote, as the only means of averting civil war? Yet Gov. Seymour demanded the submission of the Crittenden Compromise to such a vote, under circumstances wherein (as Gov. Seward had so forcibly stated) the argument of fear was the only one relied on, and Republicans were to be coerc
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
Free States were represented, viz.: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Conctively. Mr. Amos Tuck [Republican], of New Hampshire, submitted an Address to the People of theachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont--9. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, owa, Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Vermont-8. Mr. Guthrie next moved theicut, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire. Vermont--7. Mr. Guthrie next moved th Maryland, Missouri, New-Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessowa, Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Vermont, Virginia--9. Mr. Guthrie nex, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tenness representing the following States: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode island, Con[7 more...]
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
hio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Charles B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delawa by the following vote: Ays--Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Ha, Virginia--4. Noes-Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, New, Virginia-5. Noes--Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, Newhe Legislatures of the States of Kentucky and Illinois, in applying to Congress to call a Convention by the following vote: Ays--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New Yor,Tennessee,Virginia-11. Noes--Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, ally divided: Ays--Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New-J, as follows: Ays--Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New-Jn divided, and not voting: Ays--Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Oh[8 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...