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Mill Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
il the middle of the month. It was directed to Columbia, and, by occupying that neighborhood, enabled General Bragg to feed his army in Middle Tennessee. Without such aid he could not have done this, and would have been compelled to abandon the country north of the Tennessee River. In the middle of January General Wheeler made an expedition with the principal part of the cavalry of the Army of Tennessee, to interrupt the Federal communications. After burning the railroad-bridge over Mill Creek, nine miles from Nashville, he went on to the Cumberland and captured there four loaded transports, three of which, with their cargoes, were destroyed, and the fourth bonded to carry home four hundred paroled prisoners. A gunboat which pursued the party was also captured with its armament. General Wheeler then crossed the swollen stream, the horses swimming through floating ice, and at the landing-place near Harpeth Shoals destroyed a great quantity of provisions in wagons, ready for tra
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ved at Tupelo-outnumbered greatly, however, by the Federal forces in and near Nashville, commanded by Major-General Rosecrans. Lieutenant-General Pemberton, recentlye prepared to take advantage of it, and on the 26th1 of December marched from Nashville toward Murfreesboroa. On his approach this movement was promptly reported toes in line of battle within sight. These lines were at right angles to the Nashville road. The Federal left rested on Stone's River. The Confederate right, Breco drive the Federal right and centre behind their left and to the east of the Nashville road, and seize that line of retreat; and that of Major-General Rosecrans, toications. After burning the railroad-bridge over Mill Creek, nine miles from Nashville, he went on to the Cumberland and captured there four loaded transports, threstroyed a great quantity of provisions in wagons, ready for transportation to Nashville. While inspecting the defenses of Mobile on the 22d of January, I receive
Seven Pines (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rs on November 24th. correspondence with the War Department. Colonel Morgan's achievement at Hartsville. meet the President at Chattanooga, and accompany him to Mississippi. battle of Murfreesboroa. Van Dorn attacked at Franklin. while en route to Mississippi, ordered to take direct command of General Bragg's army. events in Mississippi. General Pemberton's dispatches. battle near Port Gibson. ordered to Mississippi to take chief command. The effects of the wounds received at Seven Pines made me unfit for active military service until about the 12th of November, when I reported for duty at the war-office. At that time General Lee's army had been reorganized, and was in high condition, and much stronger than when it fought in Maryland; but that to which it was opposed was much stronger in numbers. General Bragg had returned from his expedition into Kentucky, and was placing at Murfreesboroa the army he had received at Tupelo-outnumbered greatly, however, by the Federa
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ened the Legislature, in order that the whole military force of the State might be brought out and added to the Confederate forces under Lieutenant-General Pemberton, which were utterly inadequate to the defense of the State, or to hold the Mississippi River. On the 20th, he went to Vicksburg, and was occupied there two days in examining the extensive but very slight intrenchments of the place. The usual error of Confederate engineering had been committed there. An immense intrenched camp, ropen a way by water around Vicksburg, to some point on the river, below the town. But in the beginning of April this enterprise was abandoned, and General Grant decided that his troops should march to a point selected, on the west bank of the Mississippi, and that the vessels-of-war and transports should run down to that point, passing the Confederate batteries at night. McClernand's corps (Thirteenth) led in the march, followed, at some distance, by McPherson's (Seventeenth). About the m
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
eral army; which, defeated so far from its base, could have little chance of escape. That success would enable us to overwhelm Rosecrans, by joining General Bragg with the victorious army, and transfer the war to the Ohio River, and to the State of Missouri, in which the best part of the population was friendly to us. I visited him in his office for this purpose, and began to explain myself. Before I had finished, he asked me, with a smile, to listen to a few lines on the subject; and, openins of Lieutenant-Generals Holmes and Pemberton, united for the purpose; those of General Bragg cooperating, if practicable. The defeat of General Grant would enable us to hold the Mississippi, and permit Lieutenant-General Holmes to move into Missouri. As our troops are now distributed, Vicksburg is in danger. This suggestion was not adopted, nor noticed. Several railroad accidents delayed me in my journey to Chattanooga — the location for my headquarters chosen by the War Depart
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
d prisoners, and a field-piece and caisson, with their horses. The enemy waited until the next day for reenforcements, which increased their force to three full brigades, under General Dodge, and resumed their movement towards Tuscumbia, opposed at every step by Roddy, who skirmished so effectively with the head of the column as to make the rate of marching not more than five miles a day; until the 25th, when Tuscumbia was reached. In the mean time a body of Federal troops landed at Eastport, on the south bank of the Tennessee, and burned the little town and several plantation-houses in the neighborhood. General Dodge's division moved on slowly, pressing back Roddy to Town Creek, where, on the 28th, Forrest, with his brigade, joined Roddy. Near that place the Federal forces divided; the cavalry, under Colonel Streight, turning off to the south, towards Moulton, and the main body, under General Dodge, halting, and then marching back. Leaving Roddy to observe Dodge, Forrest
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Arkansas could reach the scene of action in Mississippi much sooner than General Bragg's; and sayinthese orders had been given, he set off for Mississippi, desiring me to accompany him. He arrivemberton's troops should be concentrated in Mississippi. The President suggested to General Holmesnd that two armies far apart, like those of Mississippi and Tennessee, having different objects, anhout artillery or wagons, from Tennessee to Mississippi, fully sustained this opinion. That time whe Confederate army of Tennessee to that of Mississippi, he prepared to take advantage of it, and o the United States naval officers on the Lower Mississippi had ascertained the practicability of palonel Grierson made a raid entirely through Mississippi. Leaving Lagrange April 1th, with a brigadhe Secretary of War: Proceed at once to Mississippi and take chief command of the forces there,, because I have been accused of neglecting Mississippi, to give my time to Tennessee. at any time [11 more...]
Buena Vista (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
eral Loring, with an adequate body of troops, to select and intrench a position to frustrate such an attempt. That officer constructed Fort Pemberton in consequence of these orders, very judiciously located near the junction of the Yallobusha with the Tallahatchie, Major-General Loring's report. with the usual accessory, a raft to obstruct the channel of the latter. On the 11th the Federal flotilla appeared, descending the Tallahatchie.-nine gunboats, two of which, the Chillicothe and De Kalb, were iron-clads, and twenty transports bearing four thousand five hundred infantry and artillery. The gunboats opened their fire upon the Confederate works very soon and continued it for several hours. The 12th was devoted by the enemy to the construction of a battery on land, and on the 13th a spirited cannonade was maintained against Fort Pemberton by this battery and the gunboats. It was resumed next morning, but ceased in half an hour. The contest was renewed on the 16th, and cont
Brookhaven (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ar. While Forrest and Roddy were engaged with Dodge and Streight, Colonel Grierson made a raid entirely through Mississippi. Leaving Lagrange April 1th, with a brigade of cavalry, and passing through Pontotoc and Decatur, he reached the Southern Railroad at Newton on the 24th, where he destroyed some cars and engines, and small bridges. Crossing Pearl River at Georgetown, he struck the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad at Hazelhurst, where cars were destroyed, and some ammunition. At Brookhaven, the railroad-depot and more cars were burned, and the party arrived at Baton Rouge May 2d. In the night of April 16th the Federal fleet, of gunboats and three transports towing barges, passed the batteries of Vicksburg, and ran down to Hard times, where the land-forces were; and in the night of the 22d six more transports and barges followed. The whole effect of the artillery of the batteries on the two occasions was the burning of one transport, sinking of another, and rendering six
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
hen crossed the swollen stream, the horses swimming through floating ice, and at the landing-place near Harpeth Shoals destroyed a great quantity of provisions in wagons, ready for transportation to Nashville. While inspecting the defenses of Mobile on the 22d of January, I received a telegram from the President, directing me to proceed, with the least delay, to the headquarters of General Bragg's army, and informing me that an explanatory letter would be found at Chattanooga. The object o As there were no indications of intention on the part of the Federal commander in Tennessee to take the offensive soon, and my presence seemed to me more proper in Mississippi than in Tennessee, I left Chattanooga for Jackson, on the 9th, and at Mobile, when continuing on the 12th the inspection interrupted by the President's telegram on the 22d of January, I received the following dispatch from the Secretary of War, dated March 9th: Order General Bragg to report to the War Department here, for
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