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J. F. Moore (search for this): chapter 90
ultimately overtook us. The fight was by no means a trivial encounter; it was a battle hotly contested, fought at close range, face to face and foot to foot. The commanding officers of the various regiments are entitled to unlimited credit for the heroic manner in which they led their men. At the acme of the battle, Colonel Sammons, of the One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York, was struck in the foot, and was in consequence compelled to leave the field. His horse was shot from under him. Colonel Moore, of the Forty-seventh New-York, was also wounded, a ball striking his hand and passing out at the elbow. Colonel Barton had his coat pierced in several places and his horse shot. Colonel Henry had three horses shot, but himself escaped in a most miraculous manner. Provost-Marshal General Hall had a horse shot from under him, and as for himself, no one would believe it would be possible for him to again pass through what he did on that day, and come out unscathed. Lieutenant Jackson,
T. Seymour (search for this): chapter 90
General. On February fifth, I directed General Seymour, whose command was already embarked, to gvement. He was the bearer of a letter to General Seymour. Upon arriving at Jacksonville, after co] Jacksonville, 10 P. M., Feb. 11, 1864. General Seymour: [By Courier from Baldwin.] If yourne else. I will keep you advised promptly. T. Seymour, Brigadier-General. [E.] Sanderson, 7 Aic Despatch.] Jacksonville, February 12. General Seymour: I want your command at and beyond Bale of comfort. Some time during the night General Seymour received information of the enemy's whereven o'clock, and then the order came from General Seymour to gradually retire. The retreat was cation, and next morning to Baldwin. Here General Seymour arrived on Sunday P. M., and made arrangeCommanding Thirty-fourth U. S.C. T. Brigadier-General T. Seymour, U. S. A. Copy: W. H. Bradshaw, Liecertain imputations are afloat concerning General Seymour's treatment of colored troops, we deem it[42 more...]
a body of rebels. The gallant Elder on the right, and the dashing Langdon on the left, made an impression on the rebel lines that will go far to offset the misfortune that ultimately overtook us. The fight was by no means a trivial encounter; it was a battle hotly contested, fought at close range, face to face and foot to foot. The commanding officers of the various regiments are entitled to unlimited credit for the heroic manner in which they led their men. At the acme of the battle, Colonel Sammons, of the One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York, was struck in the foot, and was in consequence compelled to leave the field. His horse was shot from under him. Colonel Moore, of the Forty-seventh New-York, was also wounded, a ball striking his hand and passing out at the elbow. Colonel Barton had his coat pierced in several places and his horse shot. Colonel Henry had three horses shot, but himself escaped in a most miraculous manner. Provost-Marshal General Hall had a horse shot from u
l be left at Baldwin, detaching three companies to Barber's. Colonel Barton will have the Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, and One Hundred and they were compelled to retire to the rear. At the same moment Colonel Barton's brigade, the Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, and One Hundred andour men. There can be no doubt concerning the fighting qualities of Barton's brigade. On this occasion they fought like tigers; but the same ounded, a ball striking his hand and passing out at the elbow. Colonel Barton had his coat pierced in several places and his horse shot. Colhe Eighth fell back, having been under fire an hour and a half, Colonel Barton brought his brigade into action. The Forty-seventh New-Yrok waear the railroad. Here were encamped the brigade commanded by Colonels Barton, Hawley, and Montgomery. In the immediate neighborhood, also,e, near the railroad track. The column on the right was led by Colonel Barton, of the Forty-eighth New-York, in command of his brigade, consi
r artillery, was with Henry's cavalry. At the mill, Colonel Henry halted until Hawley's brigade of infantry and Hamilton's regular battery had come up. I will now atOn this occasion they fought like tigers; but the same difficulty which opposed Hawley's brigade, presented itself to them, namely, the mass of the enemy. The last suddenly a concentric fire from the enemy's curved line is poured upon us. Colonel Hawley, seeing the hot work in which his advance is engaged, orders up the Seventhon's on the left. When the Seventh New-Hampshire regiment became confused, Colonel Hawley brought forward the Eighth U. S. colored, Colonel Charles W. Fribley. A paear the railroad. Here were encamped the brigade commanded by Colonels Barton, Hawley, and Montgomery. In the immediate neighborhood, also, were the Fortieth regime the mounted infantry, under Colonel Guy V. Henry; the Seventh Connecticut, Colonel Hawley; and the Seventh New-Hampshire, Colonel Abbott. The left was commanded by
G. L. Scholendorff (search for this): chapter 90
a prisoner in the pursuit of his calling of mercy. The Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth, also on the right, suffered severely in their efforts to prevent the enemy from flanking the field. Among the dead of the noble Forty-seventh are Captain Henry Arnold, company K; First Lieutenant Charles C. Every, company B; Second Lieutenant L. Hunting, company I. The Colonel, Henry Moore, was wounded in the arm. Captain J. M. McDonald, company K; First Lieutenant Duffy, company K; and Second Lieutenant G. L. Scholendorff, all got wounds in their legs. Their companies will not muster over twenty-five men each. As the rebels were preparing to charge with reinforcements just come in by railroad, the reserves, under Colonel Montgomery, arrived. They came up at double-quick. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts went in first, with a cheer. They were followed by the First North-Carolina, (colored.) Lieutenant-Colonel Reed, in command, headed the regiment, sword in hand, and charged upon the rebel
. More than one thousand men were here collected. Some very slightly hurt; many seriously wounded. Many more had merely left the ground to help away their stricken comrades, and had not returned to take part in the fray. The retreat continued all night to Barber's Station, and next morning to Baldwin. Here General Seymour arrived on Sunday P. M., and made arrangements for the evacuation of the place, and the burning of the stores. He also caused the destruction of the property of one Derby, a neighboring rebel, who had fought and obtained protection, and then gone over to the enemy with information. The wounded men who had been brought so far, or had painfully marched hither, were packed in horse-cars and sent down the railroad, to be instantly transferred to the Cosmopolitan, or placed in hospitals at Jacksonville. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, which, with the First North-Carolina, may be said to have saved the forces from utter rout, lost about eighty men wounded and t
Elijah Lewis (search for this): chapter 90
fall back gradually, and was shot before he reached the end. He was shot in the chest, told the men to carry him to the rear, and expired in a very few minutes. Major Burritt took command, but was also wounded in a short time. At this time Captain Hamilton's battery became endangered, and he cried out to our men for God's sake to save his battery. Our United States flag, after three sergeants had forfeited their lives by bearing it during the fight, was planted on the battery by Lieutenant Elijah Lewis, and the men rallied around it, but the guns had been jammed up so indiscriminately, and so close to the enemy's lines, that the gunners were shot down as fast as they made their appearance; and the horses, whilst they were wheeling the pieces into position, shared the same fate. They were compelled to leave the battery, and failed to bring the flag away. The battery fell into the enemy's hands. During the excitement Captain Bailey took command, and brought out the regiment in go
ounted infantry, Colonel Henry; the Independent battalion of Massachusetts cavalry, under Major Stevens; and the artillery, consisting of Captain Hamilton's, Captain Langdon's, and Captain Elder's batteries, as well as a section of the Third Rhode Island artillery. In all, the force amounted to about twenty cannon, four hundred cavalry, and four thousand five. hundred infantry. This was intended to operate against an enemy whose strength was reported to be thirteen thousand men, under General Gardiner, (or Gardner,) who was said to have recently arrived from Georgia in order to defend the pasture-yard and shambles of the Confederacy from the invasion of the Union army. On the morning of the twentieth, at about nine o'clock, the troops set out to find the enemy, moving in three lines, almost parallel to the road. It was intended to reach Lake City the following day, unless the enemy should dispute the way. The route was through the unvarying pine forests of the country, over immen
William C. Manning (search for this): chapter 90
e followed by the First North-Carolina, (colored.) Lieutenant-Colonel Reed, in command, headed the regiment, sword in hand, and charged upon the rebels. They broke, but rallied when within twenty yards of contact with our negro troops. Overpowered by numbers, the First North-Carolina fell back in good order, and poured in a destructive fire. Their Colonel was felled, mortally wounded. Their Major, Boyle, fell dead, and two men were killed in trying to reach his body. Their Adjutant, Wm. C. Manning, wounded before at Malvern Hill, got a bullet in his body, but persisted in remaining, until yet another shot struck him. His Lieutenant-Colonel, learning the fact, embraced him, and implored him to leave the field. The next moment the two friends were stretched side by side; the Colonel had received his own deathwound. But the two colored regiments had stood in the gap, and saved the army! General Seymour, taking advantage of the diversion thus effected, had reestablished his field
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