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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. Search the whole document.

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others helped to fill in the blank in the atlas of 1849, which has become the network of names in the atlas of 1904. A famous company of strong men gave the best of their energies to the opening of Africa during the nineteenth century. They were missionaries, like Moffat and Livingstone; scientific inquirers, like Barth, Rohlfs, Du Chaillu, Teleki, and Thomson; adventurous explorers, like Speke, Grant, Burton, Cameron, and Selous; and soldiers, statesmen, and organisers, such as Gordon, Rhodes, Samuel Baker, Emin Pasha, Johnston, Lugard, and Taubman Goldie — but there is no need to go through the list. Their discoveries were made often with a more slender equipment and scantier resources; as administrators, one or two at least could be counted his equals. But those of the distinguished band, who still survive, would freely acknowledge that it was Stanley who put the crown and coping-stone on the edifice of African exploration, and so completed the task, begun twenty-four centuri
ess ice, and unchanging snow. But the habitable and inhabited globe is mapped and charted; and none of the explorers, who laboured at the work during the past fifty years, did so much towards the consummation as Stanley. Many others helped to fill in the blank in the atlas of 1849, which has become the network of names in the atlas of 1904. A famous company of strong men gave the best of their energies to the opening of Africa during the nineteenth century. They were missionaries, like Moffat and Livingstone; scientific inquirers, like Barth, Rohlfs, Du Chaillu, Teleki, and Thomson; adventurous explorers, like Speke, Grant, Burton, Cameron, and Selous; and soldiers, statesmen, and organisers, such as Gordon, Rhodes, Samuel Baker, Emin Pasha, Johnston, Lugard, and Taubman Goldie — but there is no need to go through the list. Their discoveries were made often with a more slender equipment and scantier resources; as administrators, one or two at least could be counted his equals.
Henry Morton Stanley (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.22
Chapter XVIII work in Review the close of the story of Stanley's African explorations may fitly be followed by a survey of the net result. Such an estimate isidney Low, in the Cornhill Magazine, for July, 1904, together with a sketch of Stanley's personality, at once so just and so sympathetic that the entire article, witight omissions, is here given a place. The map of Africa is a monument to Stanley, aere perennius. Monumentum aere perennius, says Horace, or, as we may put atlases, published during the past sixty years, which is less than the span of Stanley's lifetime. I turn to a magnificently proportioned volume, bearing the date owo-and-twenty years earlier. By 1882, there is a great change. The name of Stanley has begun to be written indelibly upon the surface of the Continent. The vaguas still its unfulfilled tasks to finish; but there can never again be another Stanley! He is the last of the discoverers, unless, indeed, we shall have to reserve
th rare efficiency. When the time for his departure came, Mtesa heard it with dismay, and asked: What is the use, then, of your coming to Uganda to disturb our minds, if, as soon as we are convinced that what you have said has right and reason in it, you go away before we are fully instructed? Stanley answered that every man has his own business and calling, that his business was that of a pioneer and not of a religious teacher, but if the king wanted real instructors, he would write to England and ask for them. The king said, Then write, Stamlee (the native pronunciation of the name), and say to the white people that I am like a child sitting in darkness, and cannot see until I am taught the right way. Thereupon followed the appeal to England, the prompt response, the planting of the mission, and the heroic story of the Uganda church triumphing over persecution and martyrdom. When Stanley wrote the story for the Cornhill Magazine, January, 1901, the Uganda people had built for
appeared, would, on the whole, have preferred not to be rescued! The journey from the Ocean to the Nile, and from the Nile to the East Coast, added much to geographical knowledge, and was the complement of Stanley's previous discoveries. But the cost was heavy, and the leader himself emerged with his health seriously impaired by the tremendous strain of those dark months. Most of his younger companions preceded him to the grave. Stanley survived Nelson, Stairs, and Parke, as well as Barttelot and Jameson; but the traces of the journey were upon him to the end, and no doubt they shortened his days. Those days — that is to say, the fourteen years that were left to him after he returned to England in the spring of 1890--were, however, full of activity, and, one may hope, of content. No other great task of exploration and administration was tendered; and perhaps, if offered, it could not have been accepted. But Stanley found plenty of occupation. He wrote, he lectured, and he
and charted; and none of the explorers, who laboured at the work during the past fifty years, did so much towards the consummation as Stanley. Many others helped to fill in the blank in the atlas of 1849, which has become the network of names in the atlas of 1904. A famous company of strong men gave the best of their energies to the opening of Africa during the nineteenth century. They were missionaries, like Moffat and Livingstone; scientific inquirers, like Barth, Rohlfs, Du Chaillu, Teleki, and Thomson; adventurous explorers, like Speke, Grant, Burton, Cameron, and Selous; and soldiers, statesmen, and organisers, such as Gordon, Rhodes, Samuel Baker, Emin Pasha, Johnston, Lugard, and Taubman Goldie — but there is no need to go through the list. Their discoveries were made often with a more slender equipment and scantier resources; as administrators, one or two at least could be counted his equals. But those of the distinguished band, who still survive, would freely acknowled
o need to go through the list. Their discoveries were made often with a more slender equipment and scantier resources; as administrators, one or two at least could be counted his equals. But those of the distinguished band, who still survive, would freely acknowledge that it was Stanley who put the crown and coping-stone on the edifice of African exploration, and so completed the task, begun twenty-four centuries ago with the voyage of King Necho's Phoeenician captains, and the Periplus of Hanno. It was Stanley who gathered up the threads, brought together the loose ends, and united the discoveries of his predecessors into one coherent and connected whole. He linked the results of Livingstone's explorations with those of Speke, and Grant, and Burton, and so enabled the great lacustrine and riverine system of Equatorial Africa to become intelligible. Without him, the work of his most illustrious predecessors might still have remained only a collection of splendid fragments. Sta
y. They were missionaries, like Moffat and Livingstone; scientific inquirers, like Barth, Rohlfs, ed, but he also corrected, the chief of all Livingstone's discoveries. The missionary traveller waion was possible with the Nile system. But Livingstone still believed that he was on the track of as the geographical legatee and executor of Livingstone. From the Scottish missionary, during thosbing people and places. But the finding of Livingstone made Stanley an explorer; and his own naturafter the Ashanti War, it was to learn that Livingstone was dead:-- The effect which this newsot to lie with the great dead of England at Livingstone's side. It is not merely on geographicalr discoveries were largely accidental; even Livingstone was constantly deflected from his route, an and appreciated in Mackay a spirit akin to Livingstone. He judged that he had dangerously overtax that Mr. Mackay, the best missionary since Livingstone, died about the beginning of February, 1890[3 more...]
of south latitude, the blank of the interior is still as conspicuous, and almost as unrelieved, as it was two-and-twenty years earlier. By 1882, there is a great change. The name of Stanley has begun to be written indelibly upon the surface of the Continent. The vague truncated Congo, or Zaire is the Livingstone River, flowing in its bold horseshoe through the heart of the formerly unexplored region, with Stanley Falls just before the river takes its first great spring westward, and Stanley Pool a thousand miles lower down, where, after a long southerly course, the mighty stream makes its final plunge to the sea. Tributary rivers, hills, lakes, villages, tribal appellations, dot the waste. Uganda is marked, and Urua, and Unyanyembe. If we pass on to the present day, and look at any good recent map, the desert seems to have become — as, indeed, it is — quite populous. There is no stretch of unknown, and apparently unoccupied land, except in the Sahara, and between Somaliland
type he sometimes represented to the general imagination. Short of stature, lean, and wiry, with a brown face, a strong chin, a square, Napoleonic head, and noticeable eyes,--round, lion-like eyes, watchful and kindly, that yet glowed with a hidden fire,--he was a striking and attractive personality; but there was nothing in him to recall the iron-handed, swash-buckling, melodramatic adventurer, such as the pioneers of new countries are often supposed to be. The bravest of the brave, a very Ney or Murat among travellers, one knew that he was; but his courage, one could see, was not of the unthinking, inconsequent variety, that would court danger for its own sake, without regard to life and suffering. What struck one most was that high seriousness, which often belongs to men who have played a great part in great events, and have been long in close contact with the sterner reality of things. His temperament was intense rather than passionate, in spite of the outbursts of quick anger
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