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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Philip Henry Sheridan (search for this): chapter 2
s armies in the spring of 1864. On April 4th Sheridan had been given charge of all the cavalry. Hebattle at Todd's Tavern, and in part at least Sheridan's earnest desire became fulfilled. The battlrings us to the very edge of the water, where Sheridan's troopers were getting their mounts into shampaign which followed these preparations that Sheridan had his famous interview with Meade, in which cavalry be immediately concentrated and that Sheridan proceed against the Confederate cavalry. On nd officers and men. The close of the war saw Sheridan at Appomattox with fifteen thousand cavalrymes horse. Union supply train. Just before Sheridan came, 1864: the eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalof March, these troopers rested in Camp until Sheridan left for his Richmond raid on May 9th. A monecond Brigade. Some of these men had been on Sheridan's Richmond and Trevilian raids. This shows tield required about 500 new horses every day. Sheridan's force alone required 150 new horses a day d[1 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 2
as an independent corps to fight the Confederate cavalry. Though they had been relieved of much of the arduous picket duty that they formerly performed, they were still considered as auxiliaries, to protect the flanks and front of the infantry. On May 7th Grant's army advanced with a view to taking Spotsylvania Court House. Thus was precipitated the cavalry battle at Todd's Tavern, and in part at least Sheridan's earnest desire became fulfilled. The battle was between Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's commands of Stuart's cavalry and Gregg's division, assisted by two brigades of Torbert's division under the command of General Merritt. After a severe engagement the Confederate cavalry broke and were pursued almost to Spotsylvania Court House. This photograph shows some of the Federal horses recuperating at Belle Plain Landing before this cavalry engagement on a large scale. The cavalry were in clover here near the tents and ships that meant a good supply of forage. There was no su
Wesley Merritt (search for this): chapter 2
rmerly performed, they were still considered as auxiliaries, to protect the flanks and front of the infantry. On May 7th Grant's army advanced with a view to taking Spotsylvania Court House. Thus was precipitated the cavalry battle at Todd's Tavern, and in part at least Sheridan's earnest desire became fulfilled. The battle was between Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's commands of Stuart's cavalry and Gregg's division, assisted by two brigades of Torbert's division under the command of General Merritt. After a severe engagement the Confederate cavalry broke and were pursued almost to Spotsylvania Court House. This photograph shows some of the Federal horses recuperating at Belle Plain Landing before this cavalry engagement on a large scale. The cavalry were in clover here near the tents and ships that meant a good supply of forage. There was no such loafing for horses and men a little later in that decisive year. The Belle Plain cavalry: a closer view. This photograph brin
S. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 2
ain Landing on the Potomac lay a chief base of supplies for Grant's armies in the spring of 1864. On April 4th Sheridan had o protect the flanks and front of the infantry. On May 7th Grant's army advanced with a view to taking Spotsylvania Court Hos senior that he could whip Stuart if allowed to do so. General Grant determined to give Sheridan the opportunity that he soud war-ridden fields, as the army advances on Richmond under Grant. While the infantry lay snug in winter-quarters, the troopps. It was Van Dorn's capture of Holly Springs that forced Grant to abandon his overland march against Vicksburg and return allowed of their being carried at the Cavalry stables at Grant's headquarters, city Point, in 1864 City Point was GrantGrant's base of supplies during the operations about Petersburg, in 1864. Sheridan at last was handling his cavalry as a separatecM. Gregg was in command of the cavalry which remained with Grant. The First Massachusetts, First New Jersey, Tenth New York
and ride patiently on again till good water was found. The vivid shadows in this photograph speak eloquently of the Sunny South. The place is Greenville in Louisiana, where one of the six great Union cavalry depots was located. The site of the Camp was selected by General Richard Arnold, Chief of Cavalry, Department of the Gulf. On June 8, 1864, from New Orleans, he requested permission to move his camping ground. Present camping-ground of the First and Fifth Brigades of my command near Banks is entirely unsuitable, and I ask permission to move to this side of the river, at or near Greenville. I can find no more suitable place on either side of the river within twenty miles of the city. Permission to move was granted June 14, 1864. various makeshifts were used on the horses' backs, and the troopers were even drilled bareback. This probationary period was a wearisome one for the cavalry recruit. A trooper must perforce learn much of what his comrade of the infantry knows,
Carl Schurz (search for this): chapter 2
en in the following circular letter, addressed by the Secretary of War to the Governors of the States: War Department, Washington, May 1, 1861. To the Governors of the Several States, And All Whom it may Concern: I have authorized Colonel Carl Schurz to raise and organize a volunteer regiment of cavalry. For the purpose of rendering it as efficient as possible, he is instructed to enlist principally such men as have served in the same arm before. The Government will provide the regiment with arms, but cannot provide the horses and equipments. For these necessaries we rely upon the patriotism of the States and the citizens, and for this purpose I take the liberty of requesting you to afford Colonel Schurz your aid in the execution of this plan. (Signed) Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Yet, in his report of preliminary operations in the first year of the war, General McClellan says: Cavalry was absolutely refused, but the governors of the States complied with my
Simon Cameron (search for this): chapter 2
olunteer regiment of cavalry. For the purpose of rendering it as efficient as possible, he is instructed to enlist principally such men as have served in the same arm before. The Government will provide the regiment with arms, but cannot provide the horses and equipments. For these necessaries we rely upon the patriotism of the States and the citizens, and for this purpose I take the liberty of requesting you to afford Colonel Schurz your aid in the execution of this plan. (Signed) Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Yet, in his report of preliminary operations in the first year of the war, General McClellan says: Cavalry was absolutely refused, but the governors of the States complied with my request and organized a few companies, which were finally mustered into the United States service and proved very useful. The armament of the volunteer cavalry regiments, organized with some show of interest after the battle of Bull Run, was along the same general lines as that of
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 2
for the arduous duties of the summer and fall. They are sitting at ease on the barebacked horses which have walked out into the cool river to slake their thirst. The wagon with the four-mule team bears the insignia of the Sixth Army Corps, commanded by Sedgwick. The canvas top is somewhat wrinkled, so it is impossible to see the entire device, which was in the shape of a Greek cross. It was during the campaign which followed these preparations that Sheridan had his famous interview with Meade, in which the former told his senior that he could whip Stuart if allowed to do so. General Grant determined to give Sheridan the opportunity that he sought, and on the very day of the interview Meade directed that the cavalry be immediately concentrated and that Sheridan proceed against the Confederate cavalry. On May 9th the expedition started with a column thirteen miles long. Stuart, however, was nothing loth to try conclusions with the Federal cavalry once more. He finally overtook i
James Harrison Wilson (search for this): chapter 2
t which they displayed in covering the confused and precipitate retreat of the Federal army, probably saved a large part of the main body from capture; but they never received the recognition that was deserved. However, the importance of cavalry was not altogether unappreciated, for we find, at Gettysburg, the Union cavalry of the Army of the Potomac aggregating nearly thirteen thousand officers and men. The close of the war saw Sheridan at Appomattox with fifteen thousand cavalrymen, while Wilson, in the South, was sweeping Mississippi and Alabama with an army of horsemen. But the evolution of this vast host from insignificant beginnings was a slow process, fraught with tremendous labor. In the South, lack of good highways forced the Southerner to ride from boyhood, while contemporaneously the Northerner, with his improved roads, employed wheeled vehicles as a means of transportation. But aside from this positive advantage to Southern organization, the Confederate leaders seemed
ut a handful, and when President Lincoln issued his call for volunteers, little or no cavalry was accepted. Even when need for it was forced on the North, it took the Federal War Department a long time to realize that an efficient cavalry ready for field service could not be extemporized in a day. Strange as it may now seem, the Federal authorities intended, in the beginning, to limit the cavalry force of the Union army to the six regular regiments; and even such a veteran soldier as General Scott gave it as his opinion that, owing to the broken and wooded character of the field of operations between the North and South, and the improvements in rifled cannon, the duties of cavalry would be unimportant and secondary. Only seven troops of regular cavalry were available for the first battle of Bull Run, in 1861, but the firm front which they displayed in covering the confused and precipitate retreat of the Federal army, probably saved a large part of the main body from capture; bu
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