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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Stephen D. Lee (search for this): chapter 15
Defending the citadel of the Confederacy O. E. Hunt, Captain, United States Army The Capitol at Richmond undefended, while Lee and his remnant were swept aside-april, 1865 The Editors desire to express their grateful acknowledgment to Colonel T. M. R. Talcott, C. E., C. S. A., for a critical examination of this chapter and many helpful suggestions. Colonel Talcott was major and aide-de-Camp on the staff of General Robert E. Lee, and later Colonel First Regiment Engineer Troops, Army of Northern Virginia, with an intimate knowledge of the Richmond defenses and is able to corroborate the statements and descriptions contained in the following pages from his personal knowledge. After the admission of Virginia to the Confederacy, General Lee was detailed as military adviser to the President, and several armies were put in the field-those of the Potomac, the Valley, the Rappahannock, the Peninsula, and Norfolk. It was not until the spring of 1862, when Richmond was
John Rodgers (search for this): chapter 15
ederate capital. Hurried preparation of the unfinished works placed them in as strong a condition as possible, and the outer line was started. When the Federal army began its advance from Yorktown, there were only three guns in position on Drewry's Bluff, but, owing to the fear that the Union gunboats would ascend the river past the batteries further down, several ship's guns were also mounted to cover the obstructions in the channel. On May 15th, a fleet of Union gunboats under Commander John Rodgers ascended the James and engaged the batteries at Drewry's Bluff. The seven heavy guns now on the works proved most effective against the fleet. After an engagement of four hours the vessels withdrew, considerably damaged. From information then in the possession of the Confederates, it was supposed that McClellan would change his base to the James in order to have the cooperation of the navy, and it was hoped that he could be successfully assailed while making the change if he cro
of the top photograph rise the stacks of the Confederate ram Virginia. Near the middle lie the ruined wheels of the Jamestown. And in the bottom picture, before Fort Darling appears the wreck of the Patrick Henry. All these were vessels of Commodore Mitchell's command that had so long made every effort to break the bonds forged about them by a more powerful force, afloat and ashore. The previous night Lincoln, as Admiral Porter's guest on the deck of the Malvern had listened to the sound of thorter at once telegraphed to his fleet-captain to open upon the forts; then the air was rent with the sound of great guns up the river. Soon, rising even louder, came the sound of four great explosions one after another — the blowing up of Commodore Mitchell's vessels. What Lincoln saw: the last of the undaunted Confederate flotilla--Virginia, Patrick Henry, and Jamestown sunk Confederate ship Patrick Henry sunk in the James River. Coal schooners wrecked to block the James--(below) Dr
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 15
he spring of 1862, when Richmond was threatened by a large Federal army under McClellan, that these forces were united under Johnston's command-Lee continuing as mil information then in the possession of the Confederates, it was supposed that McClellan would change his base to the James in order to have the cooperation of the na foes. The battle of Seven Pines, on May 31st, initiated by Johnston while McClellan's army was divided, stopped the progress of the Federals, but the serious woueral Lee to the command of the Army of Northern Virginia. Lee felt that if McClellan could not be driven out of his entrenchments, there was danger that he would his contingency, Jackson was to fall on the Federal right flank to help drive McClellan from his position. The movement was so skilfully made that the Federal commae defensive, and the history of the Peninsula campaign records the retreat of McClellan instead of a close investment of Richmond. During these operations, the fi
eturn to its former peaceful use. troops, so that the main body of the Army of Northern Virginia could be utilized in strategic operations, without danger of the fall of the capital into the hands of small raiding parties from the Federal forces. The energies of the Richmond Government were exerted in so many directions in preparing for the struggle that the immediate preparations for the defense of the capital had to proceed very uncertainly. On June 14th, General Lee reported to Governor Letcher that the work on the redoubts which had been projected was going on so slowly that he deemed it his duty to call the governor's attention to the matter. Lee had, during the previous month, taken the precaution to fortify the James River below the mouth of the Appomat-tox, by having works erected on the site of old Fort Powhatan, about twelve miles below the confluence of the two rivers, and at Jamestown Island, Hardin's Bluff, Mulberry Island, and Day's Point. In July, 1861, the c
enry sunk in the James River. Coal schooners wrecked to block the James--(below) Drewry's bluffs the command to devolve upon General G. W. Smith until June 2d, when President Davis assigned General Lee to the command of the Army of Northern Virginia. Lee felt that if McClellan could not be driven out of his entrenchments, there was danger that he would move by successive positions, under cover of his heavy guns, to within shelling distance of Richmond; and to prevent this contingency, Jackson was to fall on the Federal right flank to help drive McClellan from his position. The movement was so skilfully made that the Federal commanders in the Valley and the authorities in Washington were completely deceived, and the Union army now found itself on the defensive, and the history of the Peninsula campaign records the retreat of McClellan instead of a close investment of Richmond. During these operations, the field-works thrown up by the Confederate army constituted the principal
T. M. R. Talcott (search for this): chapter 15
citadel of the Confederacy O. E. Hunt, Captain, United States Army The Capitol at Richmond undefended, while Lee and his remnant were swept aside-april, 1865 The Editors desire to express their grateful acknowledgment to Colonel T. M. R. Talcott, C. E., C. S. A., for a critical examination of this chapter and many helpful suggestions. Colonel Talcott was major and aide-de-Camp on the staff of General Robert E. Lee, and later Colonel First Regiment Engineer Troops, Army of NorthColonel Talcott was major and aide-de-Camp on the staff of General Robert E. Lee, and later Colonel First Regiment Engineer Troops, Army of Northern Virginia, with an intimate knowledge of the Richmond defenses and is able to corroborate the statements and descriptions contained in the following pages from his personal knowledge. After the admission of Virginia to the Confederacy, General Lee was detailed as military adviser to the President, and several armies were put in the field-those of the Potomac, the Valley, the Rappahannock, the Peninsula, and Norfolk. It was not until the spring of 1862, when Richmond was threatened by a
Danville Leadbetter (search for this): chapter 15
hich the Confederacy stood in such woeful need. The Arsenal at Richmond (after the fire) The Tredegar works for heavy guns Virginia for river, coast, and harbor defenses made previous to the secession of the State. On October 9th, Major Leadbetter, acting chief of the engineer bureau, reported to the Secretary of War that the pressure of work of all kinds on the city, State, and general governments had been such that but little progress had been made on the Richmond defenses. Only silimited, and the demand was so great that none could be spared for Richmond itself. By this time, the State authorities were anxious that the whole responsibility for the fortifications should be assumed by the Confederate Government, and Major Leadbetter recommended that these wishes be observed. The greatest difficulty which he apprehended for the general Government was the lack of competent engineer officers. A number of officers of the line had been detailed as acting engineers, and wit
he Federals, but the serious wounding of Johnston caused Destruction to the Confederate fleet. Here are some of the sights presented to the view of President Lincoln and Admiral Porter aboard the flagship Malvern, as they proceeded up the James on the morning of April 3, 1865, to enter the fallen city of Richmond. To themodore Mitchell's command that had so long made every effort to break the bonds forged about them by a more powerful force, afloat and ashore. The previous night Lincoln, as Admiral Porter's guest on the deck of the Malvern had listened to the sound of the great engagement on shore and had asked if the navy could not do something uns up the river. Soon, rising even louder, came the sound of four great explosions one after another — the blowing up of Commodore Mitchell's vessels. What Lincoln saw: the last of the undaunted Confederate flotilla--Virginia, Patrick Henry, and Jamestown sunk Confederate ship Patrick Henry sunk in the James River. Coal
patriotic duty of helping in the fortification of the city, and, by formal resolution of a committee on defenses, proposed that the city bear its proportionate share of the expense, and that their officers consult with those of the general Government as to the strength and location of the works. It was decided to employ the services of such free negroes as would be available in the city, under the superintendence of competent officers. To these resolutions the Secretary of War replied on July 12th, concurring in the views expressed, and saying that the question of the division of expense should be adjusted easily, inasmuch as there was a duty on the part of the Government to provide its share toward the protection of its capital; that the militia would be armed, equipped, and drilled immediately, and that the construction of the fortifications would be pushed. The works erected during the spring and summer of 1861 in and around Norfolk and on the James River and the Peninsula, we
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