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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ely succeeded in adding so many iron coffins to the navy. It was asserted that no monitor would prove seaworthy in heavy weather, to say nothing of being able to cross the ocean. In the spring of 1866, therefore, the Navy Department determined to despatch the Miantonomoh across the Atlantic; and, to show his faith in the iron coffins he had advocated, Assistant Secretary Fox embarked on her at St. John, N. B., on June 5th. Meanwhile the Monadnock had been despatched around the Horn to San Francisco; her progress was watched with far greater enthusiasm than that of the Oregon during the Spanish War. The Miantonomoh reached Queenstown in safety, after a passage of ten days and eighteen hours, and about the same time the Monadnock arrived at her destination, thus proving beyond cavil both the speed and seaworthiness of the American monitor. An epoch in naval warfare Under the date of July 4, 1861, the Secretary of the Navy of the United States, the Honorable Gideon Welles, i
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
nemy. Her powers as a ram are regarded as very formidable, and it is hoped that you may be able to test them. Like the bayonet charge of infantry, this mode of attack, while the most destructive, will commend itself to you in the present scarcity of ammunition. It is one, also, that may be rendered destructive at night against the enemy at anchor. Even without guns, the ship would be formidable as a ram. Could you pass Old Point and make a dashing cruise on the Potomac as far as Washington, its effect upon the public mind would be important to the cause. The reason that the Merrimac did not pass Old Point Comfort, or proceed to New York, is told in another place, when she and the little Ericsson Monitor met. However, as far as her anticipated work was done, it was successful. With the wooden vessels she had it all her own way. But as of the Monitor herself, after the engagement, too high hopes were formed, so, of her antagonist, before she had been tried out, too much w
Passaic, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
imac in Hampton Roads, no less than thirty-five ironclads of the monitor type were being constructed for the Federal navy. The old Continental Iron Works in New York, that had built the original monitor, were busy turning out six vessels of the Passaic class, while others were being rushed up by shipbuilders in the East, and on the Ohio and the Mississippi. Ericsson was already at work upon the huge Dictator and Puritan, each nearly five times as large as the first monitor. These were destin York, Philadelphia, and Boston were at work upon the four double-turreted monitors of the Miantonomoh class. Not satisfied with all this activity, the Navy Department, in September, 1862, let the contracts for nine more monitors similar to the Passaic class, but slightly larger. Among these was the Saugus ; and one of her sister-ships, the Canonicus, gave her name to the class. The most famous of the nine was the Tecumseh. Her bold commander, T. A. N. Craven, in an effort to grapple with
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
red by Ericsson. Only a few months after the duel of the Monitor and the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, no less than thirty-five ironclads of the monitor type were being constructed for the Federal navy. The old Continental Iron Works in New York, that had built the original monitor, were busy turning out six vessels of the Passaic class, while others were being rushed up by shipbuilders in the East, and on the Ohio and the Mississippi. Ericsson was already at work upon the huge Dictator and Puritan, each nearly five times as large as the first monitor. These were destined not to be completed till after the close of the war. But the navy-yards at New York, Philadelphia, and Boston were at work upon the four double-turreted monitors of the Miantonomoh class. Not satisfied with all this activity, the Navy Department, in September, 1862, let the contracts for nine more monitors similar to the Passaic class, but slightly larger. Among these was the Saugus ; and one of her sister-ships,
St. John (Canada) (search for this): chapter 7
nestly advocated the construction of monitors while the type was still an experiment, had merely succeeded in adding so many iron coffins to the navy. It was asserted that no monitor would prove seaworthy in heavy weather, to say nothing of being able to cross the ocean. In the spring of 1866, therefore, the Navy Department determined to despatch the Miantonomoh across the Atlantic; and, to show his faith in the iron coffins he had advocated, Assistant Secretary Fox embarked on her at St. John, N. B., on June 5th. Meanwhile the Monadnock had been despatched around the Horn to San Francisco; her progress was watched with far greater enthusiasm than that of the Oregon during the Spanish War. The Miantonomoh reached Queenstown in safety, after a passage of ten days and eighteen hours, and about the same time the Monadnock arrived at her destination, thus proving beyond cavil both the speed and seaworthiness of the American monitor. An epoch in naval warfare Under the date of
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
tery Dantzler and the Confederate vessels in the James River, June 21, 1864. Again on August 13th she locked horns with the Confederate fleet at Dutch Gap. She was actively engaged on the James and the Appomattox and took part in the fall of Fort Fisher, the event that marked the beginning of the last year of the war. The latest type of iron sea-elephant in 1864: the double-turreted monitor Onondaga After having steadily planned and built monitors of increasing efficiency during the wor a breathing space. The Mahopac had a crew of 92 men. Her first engagement was with Battery Dantzler in the James River, Nov. 29, 1864. In December, 1864, and January, 1865, the Mahopac was in the first line of the ironclads that bombarded Fort Fisher. Her men declared that she silenced every gun on the sea-face of that fort. The Mahopac on active service The monitor Mahopac. You will hoist your flag on the Virginia, or any other vessel of your squadron, which will, for the pre
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
guns could pour in such a hail of missiles that it was difficult for cannoneers on land to stand to their posts. The Galena, with but six guns, found this condition exactly reversed, and on May 15, 1862, she was found wanting in the attack on Fort Darling, at Drewry's Bluff, the Federal navy's first attempt to reach Richmond. There, under Commander John Rodgers, she came into direct competition with Ericsson's Monitor. Both vessels were rated in the same class, and their tonnage was nearly eqDrewry's Bluff, the Federal navy's first attempt to reach Richmond. There, under Commander John Rodgers, she came into direct competition with Ericsson's Monitor. Both vessels were rated in the same class, and their tonnage was nearly equal. The engagement lasted three hours and twenty minutes. The two ironclads, anchored within six hundred yards of the fort, sprung their broadsides upon it, eight guns in all against fourteen. In the action the Galena lost thirteen men killed and eleven wounded. A single 10-inch shot broke through her armor and shattered her hull almost beyond repair. The Monitor remained entirely uninjured, without the loss of a single man. After the engagement the Galena was found to be so cut up that her
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ased upon a plan which will render the battery U. S. S. Galena --one of the three first experiments in Federal ironclads vessels of her class. A small corvette, to be called the Galena, was also ordered, her sides to be plated with three-inch ly armored ships, both more or less experimental, one, the Galena, destined to be a failure, while the other, named the New a still closer appearance Inadequate armor-deck of the Galena after her great fight The Galena early proved incapableGalena early proved incapable of the work for which she had been planned. It was the belief that her armor would enable her to stand up against the poweicult for cannoneers on land to stand to their posts. The Galena, with but six guns, found this condition exactly reversed,it, eight guns in all against fourteen. In the action the Galena lost thirteen men killed and eleven wounded. A single 10-iwithout the loss of a single man. After the engagement the Galena was found to be so cut up that her armor plate was removed
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of action in a disabled condition. It was only by great coolness and courage that the Carondelet was extricated after being exposed to a terrific fire for some time. The Pittsburg was conspicuous in the fight with the Confederate flotilla at Fort Pillow. She was sent by Admiral Porter on the famous land cruise up the Yazoo, which nearly cost him the flotilla. She ran the batteries at Vicksburg and helped to silence the batteries at Grand Gulf, Mississippi. In May, 1863, she was with Admiraled, and her smokestacks, after-cabin, and boats were riddled with shot. She was soon in commission again and joined the flotilla above Island No.10. In the sudden attack by which the Confederate gunboats surprised the Federal squadron above Fort Pillow, the Cincinnati again met disaster and was towed to shallow water, where she sank. Again she was repaired in time to take part in the bombardment of Vicksburg, May 27, 1863, under Lieutenant George D. Bache. Here she gallantly engaged single
Jamestown (Virginia) (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
f 92 men. Her first engagement was with Battery Dantzler in the James River, Nov. 29, 1864. In December, 1864, and January, 1865, the Mahopac was in the first line of the ironclads that bombarded Fort Fisher. Her men declared that she silenced every gun on the sea-face of that fort. The Mahopac on active service The monitor Mahopac. You will hoist your flag on the Virginia, or any other vessel of your squadron, which will, for the present, embrace the Virginia, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Raleigh, and Beaufort. The Virginia is a novelty in naval construction, is untried, and her powers unknown, and the department will not give specific orders as to her attack upon the enemy. Her powers as a ram are regarded as very formidable, and it is hoped that you may be able to test them. Like the bayonet charge of infantry, this mode of attack, while the most destructive, will commend itself to you in the present scarcity of ammunition. It is one, also, that may be re
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