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Iuka (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Chapter 4: Iuka and Second Corinth General Rosecrans misrepresented. Hostile criticcularly distinguished himself in the battles of Iuka and Corinth, in the autumn following the first Corinth, while General Price seized the town of Iuka, which was promptly abandoned by a small garris Ord to Corinth, and moved him by Burnsville on Iuka, by the main road twenty-six miles. General Grathe south, via Jacinto, with orders to approach Iuka by the two main roads coming into Iuka from theIuka from the south, viz., the Jacinto and Fulton roads. On the 18th General Ord encountered the enemy about four miles out of Iuka. His orders contemplated that he should not make a serious attack until Rosecof the last-named officer will show: Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halld to collect our strength to move upon Price at Iuka, in two columns; the one to the right of the ratook place about two weeks after the action at Iuka, General Sherman is still more unjust to Genera[1 more...]
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ad and wounded in our hands. * * * * Meantime, General Grant at Jackson, had dispatched Brigadier-General McPherson with a brigade directlt the time of the movement, and his full report made later: Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Yese wounded, are left on our hands. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Gen to get them to the right place. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 6, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Geneneral Martin said to be killed. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 8, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Wasington, D. C. Roseg your army on the country? H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Jackson, October 8, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. An e. The following extract from orders issued by General Grant at Jackson, October 7th, shows that he then thought General Rosecrans had acc
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
suppose that General Rosecrans had behaved badly in both these actions. Of the battle at Iuka, he says: In the early part of September the enemy in our front manifested great activity, feeling with cavalry at all points, and on the 13th General Van Dorn threatened Corinth, while General Price seized the town of Iuka, which was promptly abandoned by a small garrison under Colonel Murphy. Price's force was about eight thousand men, and the general impression was that he was en route for Eastport, with the purpose to cross the Tennessee River in the direction of Nashville, in aid of General Bragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, prepared to regain Corinth before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, and moved him by Burnsville on Iuka, by the main road twenty-six miles. General Grant accompanied this column as far as Burnsville. At the same time he had dispatched Rosecrans by roads to the south, via Jacinto, with
Holly Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
mass of confused and routed men, Van Dorn's army would surely have been utterly ruined; as it was, Van Dorn regained Holly Springs somewhat demoralized. General Rosecrans did not begin his pursuit till the next morning, the 5th, and it was then n be spared with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enable us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which will be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to combine, push, and whip them. We have whipped, and shg to push them while they are broken, weary, hungry, and ill supplied. Draw every thing from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs. Let us concentrate, and appeal to the governors of the States to rush down some twenty or thirty new regiments to hsary to the safety of our army. They could not have possibly caught the enemy before reaching his fortifications at Holly Springs, and where a garrison of several thousand troops was left that were not engaged in the battle of Corinth. Our own tr
Davis Mills (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t have possibly caught the enemy before reaching his fortifications at Holly Springs, and where a garrison of several thousand troops was left that were not engaged in the battle of Corinth. Our own troops would have suffered for food, and suffered greatly from fatigue. Finding that the pursuit had followed so far, and that our forces were very much scattered, I immediately ordered an advance from Bolivar to be made, to cover the return of the Corinth forces. They went as far south as Davis' Mills, about seven miles south of Grand Junction, drove a small rebel garrison from there, and entirely destroyed the railroad bridges at that place. The accompanying reports show fully all the casualties and other results of these battles. I am, Colonel, very respectfully your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Major-General commanding. The following is the close of General Rosecrans' report of this battle: Thus by noon ended the battle of the 4th of October. After waiting
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
not the case in northern Mississippi. If Price was aiming for Tennessee he failed, and was therefore beaten. He made a wide circuit by the south aid again joined Van Dorn. * * * * To what extent this action was a reverse for General Rosecrans, and in what degree General Grant was offended, the reports of the last-named officer will show: Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief. General Rosecrans, with Stanley and Hamilton's divisions of Missouri cavalry, attacked General Price south of this village about two hours before dark yesterday, and had a sharp fight until night closed in. General Ord was to the north with an armed force of about five thousand men, and had some skirmishing with rebel pickets. This morning the fight was resumed by General Rosecrans, who was nearest to the town, but it was found that the enemy had been evacuating during the night, going south. Hamilton and Stanley, with the cavalry, are in full pursuit.
Hatchie River (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ticipation of his victory, had ordered him to pursue instantly, notifying him that he had ordered Ord's and Hurlbut's divisions rapidly across to Pocahontas, so as to strike the rebels in flank. On the morning of the 5th, General Ord reached Hatchie River at Davis' bridge, with four thousand men; crossed over and encountered the retreating army, captured a battery and several hundred prisoners, dispersing the rebel advance and forcing the main column to make a wide circuit by the south in order to cross the Hatchie River. Had General Rosecrans pursued promptly and been on the heels of this mass of confused and routed men, Van Dorn's army would surely have been utterly ruined; as it was, Van Dorn regained Holly Springs somewhat demoralized. General Rosecrans did not begin his pursuit till the next morning, the 5th, and it was then too late. General Grant was again displeased with him, and never became fully reconciled. General Rosecrans was soon after relieved, and transfer
O. E. C. Ord (search for this): chapter 4
th before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, and moved him by Burnsville on Iukahe Jacinto and Fulton roads. On the 18th General Ord encountered the enemy about four miles out d, and the next morning was gone. Although General Ord must have been within four or six miles of had a sharp fight until night closed in. General Ord was to the north with an armed force of abod of the endurance of the troops under him. General Ord's command showed untiring zeal, but the dirs; the one to the left, commanded by Major-General O. E. C. Ord. On the night of the 18th the latteue instantly, notifying him that he had ordered Ord's and Hurlbut's divisions rapidly across to Pocebels in flank. On the morning of the 5th, General Ord reached Hatchie River at Davis' bridge, witgot possession of the heights with our troops. Ord took two batteries and about two hundred prisonGeneral H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Generals Ord and Hurlbut came on the enemy's rear yester[1 more...]
l report made later: Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Yesterday the rebels under Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell were repulsed from their attack on Corinth with great slaughter. The enemy are in full retreat, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. Rosecrans telegraphs that the loss is serious on our side, particularly in officers, but bears no comparison with that of the enemy. General Hackleman fell while gallantly leading his brigade. General Oglesby is dangerously wounded. McPherson reached Corinth with his command yesterday. Rosecrans pursued the retreating enemy this morning, and should he attempt to move toward Boliver, will follow him to that place. Hurlbut is at the Hatchie with five or six thousand men, and is no doubt, now with the pursuing column. From seven hundred to a thousand prisoners, beside wounded, are left on our hands. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washingto
e of about five thousand men, and had some skirmishing with rebel pickets. This morning the fight was resumed by General Rosecrans, who was nearest to the town, but it was found that the enemy had been evacuating during the night, going south. Hamilton and Stanley, with the cavalry, are in full pursuit. This will, no doubt, break up the enemy, and possibly force them to abandon much of their artillery. The loss on either side in killed and wounded is from four to five hundred. The enemyition until Van Dorn could come up on the south-west of Corinth and make a simultaneous attack, they were defeated in that. Our only defeat was in not capturing the entire army, or in destroying it, as I had hoped to do. It was a part of General Hamilton's command that did the fighting, directed entirely by that cool and deserving officer. I commend him to the President for acknowledgment for his services. * * * * I can not close this report without paying a tribute to all the officers an
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