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H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 4
l show: Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief. General Rosecrans, with Stanlhin the line of his forts. These had been begun under General Halleck, but were much strengthened by General Grant, and conseport made later: Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Yesterday the rebels under VaGrant, Major-General. Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. General Ord, who followed Hurrant, Major-General. Jackson, October 6, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Generals Ord and Hurlbut camerant, Major-General. Jackson, October 8, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Wasington, D. C. Rosecrans has followed rebels nto Mississippi, supporting your army on the country? H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Jackson, October 8, 1862. GeneGeneral H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. An army can not subsist itself on the country except in forage. They did not start o
Hackleman (search for this): chapter 4
nt by General Grant at the time of the movement, and his full report made later: Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Yesterday the rebels under Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell were repulsed from their attack on Corinth with great slaughter. The enemy are in full retreat, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. Rosecrans telegraphs that the loss is serious on our side, particularly in officers, but bears no comparison with that of the enemy. General Hackleman fell while gallantly leading his brigade. General Oglesby is dangerously wounded. McPherson reached Corinth with his command yesterday. Rosecrans pursued the retreating enemy this morning, and should he attempt to move toward Boliver, will follow him to that place. Hurlbut is at the Hatchie with five or six thousand men, and is no doubt, now with the pursuing column. From seven hundred to a thousand prisoners, beside wounded, are left on our hands. U. S. Grant, Major-General.
John A. Rawlins (search for this): chapter 4
e of infantry and artillery. * * * * To these two divisions of the army all praise is due, and will be awarded by a grateful country. Between them there should be, and I trust is, the warmest bonds of brotherhood. Each was risking life in the same cause, and on this occasion risking it also to save and assist the other. No troops could do more than these separated armies. Each did all possible for it to do in the place assigned it. * * * * By command of Major-General Grant, John A. Rawlins, A. A. G. General Grant closed his formal report of this battle as follows: As shown by the reports, the enemy was repulsed at Corinth, at 11 A. M. on the 4th, and not followed until next morning. Two days hard fighting without rest, probably, had so fatigued the troops as to make earlier pursuit impracticable. I regretted this as the enemy would have been compelled to abandon most of his artillery and transportation in the difficult roads of the Hatchie crossing had t
capturing two batteries, about three hundred prisoners, and many small arms. I immediately apprised General Rosecrans of these fact, and directed him to urge on the good work. The following dispatch just received: Chewalla, October 6, 1862. To Major-General Grant. The enemy are totally routed, throwing every thing away. We are following sharply. W. S. Rosecrans. Under previous instructions, Hurlbut is also following. McPherson is in the lead of Rosecrans' column. Rebel General Martin said to be killed. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 8, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Wasington, D. C. Rosecrans has followed rebels to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will occupy Grand Juction to-morrow. With reenforcements rapidly sent in from the new lines, I can take any thing on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last night, but he is so adverse to returning that I have directed him to remain still, until you can be heard from. U. S. Grant, M
General Van Dorn threatened Corinth, while General Price seized the town of Iuka, which was promptlned by a small garrison under Colonel Murphy. Price's force was about eight thousand men, and the acinto road, leaving the Fulton road clear for Price's use. Price perceived his advantage, and attaPrice perceived his advantage, and attacked with vehemence the head of Rosecrans' column, Hamilton's division, beating it back, capturing in Rosecrans was driven to the defensive, and Price, perceiving his danger, deliberately withdrew h is not the case in northern Mississippi. If Price was aiming for Tennessee he failed, and was th's divisions of Missouri cavalry, attacked General Price south of this village about two hours befooners. I have reliable information that it was Price's intention to move over east of Tennessee. Ited them taking the active part they desired. Price's force was about fifteen thousand. U. S. Gr forces of Mississippi, commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Lovell, Villipigue, and Rust in person, numbe[3 more...]
D. S. Stanley (search for this): chapter 4
was a reverse for General Rosecrans, and in what degree General Grant was offended, the reports of the last-named officer will show: Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief. General Rosecrans, with Stanley and Hamilton's divisions of Missouri cavalry, attacked General Price south of this village about two hours before dark yesterday, and had a sharp fight until night closed in. General Ord was to the north with an armed force of about five thousand men, and had some skirmishing with rebel pickets. This morning the fight was resumed by General Rosecrans, who was nearest to the town, but it was found that the enemy had been evacuating during the night, going south. Hamilton and Stanley, with the cavalry, are in full pursuit. This will, no doubt, break up the enemy, and possibly force them to abandon much of their artillery. The loss on either side in killed and wounded is from four to five hundred. The enemy's loss in arms, te
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 4
off, leaving their dead and wounded in our hands. * * * * Meantime, General Grant at Jackson, had dispatched Brigadier-General McPherson with a brigade directly for Corinth, which reached General Rosecrans-after the battle; and in anticipation of his victory, had ordered him to pursue instantly, notifying him that he had ordered Ord's and Hurlbut's divisions rapidly across to Pocahontas, so as to strike the rebels in flank. On the morning of the 5th, General Ord reached Hatchie River at Davis' bridge, with four thousand men; crossed over and encountered the retreating army, captured a battery and several hundred prisoners, dispersing the rebel advance and forcing the main column to make a wide circuit by the south in order to cross the Hatchie River. Had General Rosecrans pursued promptly and been on the heels of this mass of confused and routed men, Van Dorn's army would surely have been utterly ruined; as it was, Van Dorn regained Holly Springs somewhat demoralized. Gener
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 4
ragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, preparen Iuka, by the main road twenty-six miles. General Grant accompanied this column as far as Burnsvilwhich I have the honor to command. * * * * U. S. Grant, Major-General. In his account of thers, beside wounded, are left on our hands. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 5, 1862. Rebel General Martin said to be killed. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 8, 186remain still, until you can be heard from. U. S. Grant, Major-General. General Rosecrans' proro, Miss., October 7, 1862, midnight. Major-General Grant, Jackson, Tenn. Yours, 8:30 P. M., rhe following extract from orders issued by General Grant at Jackson, October 7th, shows that he the the pursuit, and the satisfaction felt by General Grant at the results. So far as the differencessting upon pursuing the enemy beyond where General Grant considered it prudent to do so, and persis[20 more...]
McPherson (search for this): chapter 4
d wounded in our hands. * * * * Meantime, General Grant at Jackson, had dispatched Brigadier-General McPherson with a brigade directly for Corinth, which reached General Rosecrans-after the battle Hackleman fell while gallantly leading his brigade. General Oglesby is dangerously wounded. McPherson reached Corinth with his command yesterday. Rosecrans pursued the retreating enemy this morniowing sharply. W. S. Rosecrans. Under previous instructions, Hurlbut is also following. McPherson is in the lead of Rosecrans' column. Rebel General Martin said to be killed. U. S. Grant, Mgiments) to reenforce Corinth and Bolivar, as before stated; four of these were sent under General McPherson to the former place and formed the advance in the pursuit. Two were sent to Bolivar, and * * W. S. Rosecrans, Major-General. Another report of General Rosecrans shows that General McPherson with his fresh troops, reached him just before sunset after the battle, and together with
th cavalry at all points, and on the 13th General Van Dorn threatened Corinth, while General Price sm in force, prepared to regain Corinth before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, a wide circuit by the south aid again joined Van Dorn. * * * * To what extent this action was ted in that; if to hold their, position until Van Dorn could come up on the south-west of Corinth anes at the intersection of the two railroads. Van Dorn closed down on the forts by the evening of theels of this mass of confused and routed men, Van Dorn's army would surely have been utterly ruined; as it was, Van Dorn regained Holly Springs somewhat demoralized. General Rosecrans did not beginshington, D. C. Yesterday the rebels under Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell were repulsed from their ah, and 5th inst., over the combined armies of Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell. * * * While one division ned rebel forces of Mississippi, commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Lovell, Villipigue, and Rust in perso[1 more...]
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