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contained in the act of Congress approved Aug. 6, preceding. Another instance of the kind occurred at the hands of General Hunter, the following year. That officer, being in command at Hilton Head, N. C., proclaimed the States of Georgia, Floridaeen bitterly censured by extremists for his action towards General Fremont, and though he knew that to interfere with General Hunter would only bring upon him even a worse storm of reproaches, he did not shrink from what he believed his duty in the matter. He immediately issued a proclamation sternly revoking General Hunter's order, saying that the government had not had any knowledge of the general's intention to issue an order, and distinctly stating that neither General Hunter nor any other General Hunter nor any other commander or person has been authorized by the government of the United States to make proclamation declaring the slaves of any State free. I further make known, he continued, that whether it be competent for me, as commander-in-chief of the army an
onsiderate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my name, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. [L. S.] Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. Abraham Lincoln. The pen with which President Lincoln wrote his Proclamation of Emancipation was given to Senator Sumner by the President, at the request of the former, and by him presented to the late George Livermore, of Boston. It is a steel-pen, of the kind called The Washington, in a common cedar holder—all as plain and unostentatious as was the President himself. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State. By the Emancipation Proclamation 3,063,392 slaves were set free, as follows: Arkansas111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina27
roportions the war would assume and what other measures would be found necessary to end it. General Fremont, then in command of the Western Department of the army, chose to assume that the confiscatizens of Missouri who had taken, or should take, up arms against the government. This action of Fremont embarrassed President Lincoln greatly. For whatever may have been his hope that the outcome ofmy to take such a course then in this matter was rather premature. He accordingly wrote to General Fremont requesting him to modify his proclamation. The general replied with a request that the Pretherefore issued a special order, Sept. 11, 1861, declaring that the emancipation clause of General Fremont's proclamation be so modified, held, and construed as to conform with and not to transcend . Though President Lincoln had been bitterly censured by extremists for his action towards General Fremont, and though he knew that to interfere with General Hunter would only bring upon him even a
the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States. Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the
wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall be, free; and that the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain
ates, the negroes came flocking into the Union lines, large numbers being set free by the disorganized condition of affairs from the usual labor on the farms and plantations of the South. Then the question arose, What can be done with them? General Butler, when they came into his camp at Fort Monroe, detained them and refused to surrender them upon the application of their owners on the plea that they were contraband of war, that is, property which could be used in military operations, and thear, subject to seizure. He set the ablebodied men to work upon government fortifications, and when they brought their women and children with them he issued rations to them and charged them to the service of the men. The President sustained General Butler's action in this case and the example was followed by other commanders. The government ordered strict accounts to be kept of the labor thus performed, as it was not yet determined that these laborers should be regarded as free. On Aug. 6, 1
Emancipation proclamations. For many years there has been a fiction that Gen. Benjamin F. Butler issued the first proclamation freeing the slaves. That officer never issued such a proclamation, but he was the first to suggest to the government a partial solution of the very perplexing question as to what was to be done with the slaves during the Civil War. It was held that the Constitution of the United States did not give to Congress, or to the non-slave-holding States, any right to interfere with the institution of slavery. This was reaffirmed by Congress in a resolution passed by the House, Feb. 11, 1861, without a dissenting voice, to reassure the South that, in spite of the election of Mr. Lincoln, the North had no intention of usurping power not granted by the Constitution. But when, after the outbreak of the war, the army began to occupy posts in the seceding and slave-holding States, the negroes came flocking into the Union lines, large numbers being set free by the d
Done at the city of Washington, this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. Abraham Lincoln. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State. This warning was unheeded, and on the day mentioned the President issued the following proclamation: Proclamation. Whereas, On the 22d day of September; in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred anuest of the former, and by him presented to the late George Livermore, of Boston. It is a steel-pen, of the kind called The Washington, in a common cedar holder—all as plain and unostentatious as was the President himself. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State. By the Emancipation Proclamation 3,063,392 slaves were set free, as follows: Arkansas111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina275,081 South Carolina402,541 Texas1
emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the pow
the South that, in spite of the election of Mr. Lincoln, the North had no intention of usurping powent. This action of Fremont embarrassed President Lincoln greatly. For whatever may have been hiswould make the necessary modifications. President Lincoln therefore issued a special order, Sept. therefore declared forever free. Though President Lincoln had been bitterly censured by extremistsning proclamation: Proclamation. I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of Americ the United States the eighty-seventh. Abraham Lincoln. By the President: William H. Seward, Se the United States. Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtu of the United States the eighty-seventh. Abraham Lincoln. The pen with which President Lincoln wrPresident Lincoln wrote his Proclamation of Emancipation was given to Senator Sumner by the President, at the request osiana (part)247,734 The pen with which President Lincoln wrote his emancipation proclamation. T
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