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hen called to the field of combat, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps commanders will determine
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 20
er of the Second Army Corps, is announced as Chief of staff to the Commander of the Forces. A. S. Johnston, General C. S. A. note.—The above organization of the forces at Corinth was submitted by General G. T. Beauregard, second in command, and adopted by General A. S. Johnston, first in command, without any alteration whatever. Thomas Jordan, A. A. G. Our forces had thus been formed it is expected that much and effective work will be done by the bayonet. By command of General A. S. Johnston, Thomas Jordan, A. Adjt.-Gen. Corinth, Miss., April 18th, 1862. The foregoing planrawn up and submitted by General Beauregard, on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, to General A. S. Johnston, who accepted the same without modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brigam in receipt of your letter of—, and in reply have to say, that I remember the visit of General A. S. Johnston, accompanied by yourself, the night of the 2d of April, 1862, to the headquarters or apa
icinity of Mickey's house, at the intersection with the Bark road, before sunset. The cavalry with this wing will take position on the road to Savannah, beyond Mickey's, as far as Owl Creek, having advanced guards and pickets well to the front. The left wing of this corps will advance at the same time, also left in front, by ton as the rear of the Second Corps shall have moved out of that place. Its commander will take up the best position, whence to advance either in the direction of Mickey's or of Pratt's house, on the direct road to Pittsburg, if that road is found practicable, or in the direction of the Ridge road to Hamburg, throwing all its cava strength of these guards. VIII. Wharton's regiment of Texas cavalry will be ordered forward, at once, to scout on the road from Monterey to Savannah, between Mickey's and its intersection with the Pittsburg-Purdy road. It will annoy and harass any force of the enemy moving, by the latter way, to assail Cheatham's division at
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 20
al reserve of about half as many. This second purpose was apparently accomplished, for, during the battle of Shiloh, General Grant telegraphed General Buell, who was then at Savannah, that he was heavily attacked by one hundred thousand men, and thnd friends in middle Tennessee had informed us that General Buell was at Franklin, on his way to form a junction with General Grant, at Savannah, where he might be expected early in April. It was known, however, that the bridges on his line of marcd, in which event Buell must have reached the theatre of action entirely too late to retrieve the disaster inflicted upon Grant, and must himself have been forced to retire from middle Tennessee. The delay which had marked the outset was followed bmps, where all was now silence and repose, and where none suspected the approaching storm. From them we learned that General Grant had returned for the night to Savannah, and that General Sherman commanded the advanced forces. No other information
Jacob Thompson (search for this): chapter 20
ral Hardee's line of battle (the front one) had been formed, he sent a messenger with an urgent request that General Beauregard should ride along in front of his troops. This General Beauregard, through motives of prudence, at first refused, and only agreed to do at the instance of General Johnston himself, but he prohibited any cheering whatever, lest it should attract the attention of the opposing forces, which were known to be not more than two miles from us. See statements of Colonel Jacob Thompson and Major B. B. Waddell in Appendix to Chapter XX. Afterwards, at the request of General Bragg, General Beauregard also rode along the front of the Second Corps, where it was difficult to enforce the order prohibiting cheering, so enthusiastic were the troops—especially those from Louisiana—when he appeared before them. As soon as it had become evident that the day was too far advanced for a decisive engagement, General Johnston called the corps and reserve commanders together in
B. F. Cheatham (search for this): chapter 20
ons why the army was formed into small corps. General Beauregard desirous of moving against the enemy on the 1st of April. why it was not done. on the 2d, General Cheatham reports a strong Federal force threatening his front. General Beauregard advises an immediate advance. General Johnston yields. General Jordan's statementned useful information, relative to the positions occupied by the several Federal commands. Such was the situation, as night fell on the 2d of April, when General Cheatham, who commanded a division posted at Bethel Station, Twenty-four miles north of Corinth. telegraphed to his corps commander, General Polk, that a strong bannah, between Mickey's and its intersection with the Pittsburg-Purdy road. It will annoy and harass any force of the enemy moving, by the latter way, to assail Cheatham's division at Purdy. IX. The Chief-Engineers of the forces will take due measures and precautions, and give all requisite orders, for the repair of the bridg
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 19: Arrival of General Johnston at Corinth. position of his troops on the 27th Jordan's statement of his interview with General Johnston on that occasion. special orders no. 8, ill be without an argument. Soon after General Johnston's arrival, and in the course of his first the best plan of organizing our forces. General Johnston readily agreed to what General Beauregardhe Mississippi, which, upon submission to General Johnston, was signed by the latter, without the sl was able to shape the order in question, General Johnston and, soon thereafter, General Bragg, camehe order with the necessary precision. General Johnston weighed all that was said with much delibhat time from General Bragg himself, that General Johnston had said, soon after his arrival at Corinroduced a visible effect on all present. General Johnston, although shaken, after some reflection chless with astonishment when brought to Generals Johnston and Beauregard, at beholding so large a [26 more...]
orinth. telegraphed to his corps commander, General Polk, that a strong body of the enemy, believed sion, was seriously threatening his front. General Polk at once (about 10 P. M.) transmitted the deoom, being a circular letter to Generals Bragg, Polk, and Hardee, directing them to hold their severers, from General Bragg's headquarters, to Generals Polk and Hardee, who received them, as well as ton, as best, and I left you explaining to Generals Polk and Hardee that which they particularly wea circular letter, addressed to Generals Bragg, Polk, and Hardee, severally corps commanders. As meetinghouse. He was then informed, by Major-General Polk, that his troops had already exhausted trovident of their food that he could supply General Polk with what he needed. This promise, howeverragg's troops, arranged in the same order. General Polk's corps, formed in column of brigades, deple was followed immediately by its battery. General Polk's cavalry supported and protected his left [5 more...]
Lewis Wallace (search for this): chapter 20
ht fell on the 2d of April, when General Cheatham, who commanded a division posted at Bethel Station, Twenty-four miles north of Corinth. telegraphed to his corps commander, General Polk, that a strong body of the enemy, believed to be General Lew. Wallace's division, was seriously threatening his front. General Polk at once (about 10 P. M.) transmitted the despatch to General Beauregard, who, believing that the Federal forces were divided by the reported movement, immediately sent in the n battle of Shiloh numbered only thirty-two thousand men of all arms, when, four months after that event, he stated, under oath, at the trial of Colonel Worthington, that they amounted to fortythree thousand men, exclusive, be it remembered, of Lew. Wallace's division of about eight thousand men, on the northwest side of Owl Creek. He then supposed our force was sixty thousand strong, instead of its actual number—forty thousand three hundred and thirty-five men of all arms and conditions. But i
he Shiloh meeting-house, were formed into three lines of battle; the first, under General Hardee, extended from near Owl Creek, on the left, to near Lick Creek, on the right, a distance of less than three miles, and somewhat oblique to the Federal front line of encampments, being separated from it, on the right, by about one and a half miles, and on the left, by about two miles. General Hardee's command not being sufficiently strong to occupy the whole front, it was extended on the right by Gladden's brigade, of General Bragg's corps, and his artillery was formed immediately in his rear, on the main Pittsburg road. His cavalry protected and supported his flanks. The second line, about five hundred yards in rear of the first, was composed of the rest of General Bragg's troops, arranged in the same order. General Polk's corps, formed in column of brigades, deployed on the left of the Pittsburg road, between the latter and Owl Creek. The front of the column was about eight hundred yar
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