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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 20
rittenden—some five thousand strong, exclusive of cavalry—were halted at Beirnsville and Iuka, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. A shade of sadness, if not of despondency, rested upon General Johnston's brow. The keen anxiety and still-increasing gloom overspreading the country weighed heavily upon him. He suffered deeply, both as a patriot and as a soldier; but men of his courage and character are uncomplaining. The test of merit, in my profession, with the people, he wrote to Mr. Davis, on the 18th of March, is success. It is a hard rule, but I think it right. The concluding lines of his letter show what were his feelings, when complying with General Beauregard's urgent request for a junction of their armies: If I join this corps to the forces of Beauregard (I confess, a hazardous experiment), then, those who are now declaiming against me will be without an argument. Soon after General Johnston's arrival, and in the course of his first conference with General Beaure
J. D. Crocket (search for this): chapter 20
Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus narrowing the space over which we could be attacked to one and a half or two miles. At a later period of the war we could have rendered this position impregnable in one night, but at this time we did not do it. The fact is, that the position was not strong, except that it could not be flanked, but might have been readily made impregnable in one night to the assault of so raw a force as ours. We knew, from the careful examination of Colonel Crocket, the Federal officer captured on the 4th, that, up to the evening of that day, there were no breastworks; but the several warnings given by the conflict in which he was captured, the noisy incidents of the next day's march and reconnoissance, and our presence in full force on the field for fifteen hours before the attack, were facts which forced General Beauregard to believe the Federals would surely use the ample time they had, during that night, to throw up intrenchments sufficient fo
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 20
wo brigades. These infantry reserves, at Beirnsville, were under Brigadier-General Breckinridge, who had succeeded General Crittenden. IV. The brigades of eaced in the receipts signed by those officers, respectively, at the time. General Breckinridge, commanding a detached division at Beirnsville, received his orders fromad to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion,ts battery. General Polk's cavalry supported and protected his left flank. Breckinridge's command occupied a corresponding position behind General Bragg's right winhirty-one; General Polk's, nine thousand one hundred and thirty-six; and General Breckinridge's, seven thousand and sixty-two; presenting a total of thirty-five thous
N. B. Forrest (search for this): chapter 20
ered that preparations should be made for an attack at dawn, next day. Thus ended this memorable conference; the officers who had been present at it repairing to their respective headquarters, in good spirits and hopeful for the morrow. A description of the field of Shiloh may be appropriate, to enable the reader more readily to understand an account of that battle. The sketch of the country furnished by General Jordan, Adjutant-General of the Confederate forces, in his Campaigns of General Forrest, is so correct that we shall transcribe it here, with only slight alteration: Two streams, Lick and Owl Creeks—the latter a confluent of Snake Creek, which empties into the Tennessee—take their rise very near each other, just westward of Monterey (in a ridge which parts the waters that fall into the Mississippi from those which are affluents of the Tennessee), flowing sinuously with a general direction, the latter to the northeast and the former south of east, and they finally empty
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 20
t were his feelings, when complying with General Beauregard's urgent request for a junction of theirecent disasters; while he felt sure that General Beauregard, who held the confidence of both, was belfil, successfully, public expectation. General Beauregard, in a spirit of disinterestedness and geeral Johnston, who, no doubt, understood General Beauregard's motives, rose from his seat, advanced enefit of the great preparations made by General Beauregard, the latter was no less reluctant that tccess of the cause they were engaged in. General Beauregard now explained the situation of affairs i effect. Accordingly, a few days later, General Beauregard drew up a plan for the reorganization of of the service. Colonel Thomas Jordan, General Beauregard's Adjutant-General, was named Adjutant-Gy afterwards and reported that the noise General Beauregard had heard, and was desirous of quieting,shment when brought to Generals Johnston and Beauregard, at beholding so large a force within striki[39 more...]
B. B. Waddell (search for this): chapter 20
, to-night, at Mickey's house, at the intersection of the road from Monterey to Savannah. The cavalry, thrown well forward during the march, to reconnoitre and prevent surprise, will halt in front of the Mickey house, on the Bark road. 2. Major Waddell, A. D. C. to General Beauregard, with two good guides, will report for service to General Hardee. 3. At 3 o'clock A. M., to-morrow, the Third Corps, with the left in front, will continue to advance by the Bark road until within sight of thance of General Johnston himself, but he prohibited any cheering whatever, lest it should attract the attention of the opposing forces, which were known to be not more than two miles from us. See statements of Colonel Jacob Thompson and Major B. B. Waddell in Appendix to Chapter XX. Afterwards, at the request of General Bragg, General Beauregard also rode along the front of the Second Corps, where it was difficult to enforce the order prohibiting cheering, so enthusiastic were the troops—es
ose was apparently accomplished, for, during the battle of Shiloh, General Grant telegraphed General Buell, who was then at Savannah, that he was heavily attacked by one hundred thousand men, and thatest, on the 1st of April, as our spies and friends in middle Tennessee had informed us that General Buell was at Franklin, on his way to form a junction with General Grant, at Savannah, where he mig5th, as had been planned, or twenty-four hours earlier than it actually occurred, in which event Buell must have reached the theatre of action entirely too late to retrieve the disaster inflicted upo that, under these circumstances, and for the further reason that the enemy, being on the alert, Buell's junction would no doubt be hastened, he was no longer in favor of making the attack, but favorsburg Landing, notwithstanding their ample means of land and water transportation, the armies of Buell, from Nashville, Tennessee, and of Pope, from southeast Missouri. Yet the Confederate army ha
t, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps commanders will determine the strength of these guards.
t, under these circumstances, and for the further reason that the enemy, being on the alert, Buell's junction would no doubt be hastened, he was no longer in favor of making the attack, but favored inviting one by turning this offensive movement into a reconnoissance in force, to draw the enemy after us nearer to our base—Corinth—and thereby detach him further from his own, at Pittsburg Landing. Somewhat similar strategy had been resorted to by Wellington in 1810, when, advancing to attack Massena at Santarem, he unexpectedly found that able officer on his guard, ready for battle, on ground of his own choosing, and much stronger than he had anticipated. After making some demonstrations in front of his wily adversary, to draw him away from his stronghold, Wellington did not hesitate to retire without giving battle. General Beauregard's views produced a visible effect on all present. General Johnston, although shaken, after some reflection said that he admitted the weight and for
the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps commanders will determine the strength of these guards. VIII. Wharton's regiment of Texas cavalry will be
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