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Alford Professor (search for this): chapter 2
ngarian revolutionists for whom Kossuth had aroused much interest in this country. Bowen's views were strongly contested by a man of uncommon ability, Robert Carter, also of Cambridge, who wrote a series of papers in the Boston Atlas (1850) in defence of Kossuth and his party; and these papers, being reprinted in a pamphlet, were said to have caused the refusal of the Board of Overseers to confirm Bowen's nomination as Professor of History. Three years later, however, he was appointed Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity, a position which he held until his death. He was a man of immense reading, keen mind, and was not without those qualities which Lord Byron thought essential to an historian,--wrath and partiality. For him alone Lowell made an essential change in his Fable for critics, leaving out in the revised edition a pungent delineation of Professor Bowen. This Lowell did on becoming himself a Harvard professor; and if he had done the same
Sarah Margaret Fuller (search for this): chapter 2
n, Hedge and Miss Fuller were Cambridge born; Emerson and Channing had resided in Cambridge with their parents; while all but Miss Fuller were Harvard graduates. This certainly established at the outset a very close connection between the new literary movement and Old Cambridge; and among its later writers Lowell, Cranch, and Miss S. S. Jacobs were residents of Cambridge, while others, as Parker, Dwight, Thoreau, and Ellery Channing had spent more or less time at the University. Sarah Margaret Fuller, afterward Countess of Ossoli, was quite as distinctly as either Holmes or Lowell the product of Cambridge; whose academic influences, though applied indirectly, were what trained her mind, impaired her health, and brought out certain hereditary qualities which were not altogether attractive. She left a fragment of autobiographical romance in which she vividly describes the horrors of the intellectual forcing process to which she had been subjected, and though this sketch, as her br
S. S. Jacobs (search for this): chapter 2
contributors; Emerson, Hedge, Miss Fuller, Ripley, [W. H.] Channing, Dwight, [J. F.] Clarke, are our dependence. It is to be noticed that, of this club of seven, Hedge and Miss Fuller were Cambridge born; Emerson and Channing had resided in Cambridge with their parents; while all but Miss Fuller were Harvard graduates. This certainly established at the outset a very close connection between the new literary movement and Old Cambridge; and among its later writers Lowell, Cranch, and Miss S. S. Jacobs were residents of Cambridge, while others, as Parker, Dwight, Thoreau, and Ellery Channing had spent more or less time at the University. Sarah Margaret Fuller, afterward Countess of Ossoli, was quite as distinctly as either Holmes or Lowell the product of Cambridge; whose academic influences, though applied indirectly, were what trained her mind, impaired her health, and brought out certain hereditary qualities which were not altogether attractive. She left a fragment of autobiogr
W. H. Hurlbut (search for this): chapter 2
Boston, November 25, 1853. My Dear Sir, Our Magazine is not yet definitely determined upon. Probably, however, it will be commenced. The letters I wrote for the enlistment of contributors have been mostly answered favorably. We have already a very respectable list engaged. We are waiting to hear definitely from Mrs. Stowe, whom we hope will be induced to commence in the Feb. no. a new story. We are thankful for the interest you manifest by sending new names. I shall write to Mr. Hurlbut at once, and to the others in a day or two. Those who have already promised to write are Mr. Carter (formerly of the Commonwealth), who will furnish a political article for each number, Mr. Hildreth (very much interested in the undertaking), Thos. W. Parsons, author of an excellent translation of Dante, Parke Godwin of the New York Evening Post, Mr. Ripley of the Tribune, Dr. Elder of Phila, H. D. Thoreau of Concord, Theodore Parker (my most valued friend), Edmund Quincy, James R. Lowel
Louis Kossuth (search for this): chapter 2
s disaster. Bowen, for instance, whose self-willed and somewhat disputative temperament made him many enemies, lost the Professorship of American History in Harvard University through a series of attacks on the Hungarian revolutionists for whom Kossuth had aroused much interest in this country. Bowen's views were strongly contested by a man of uncommon ability, Robert Carter, also of Cambridge, who wrote a series of papers in the Boston Atlas (1850) in defence of Kossuth and his party; and thKossuth and his party; and these papers, being reprinted in a pamphlet, were said to have caused the refusal of the Board of Overseers to confirm Bowen's nomination as Professor of History. Three years later, however, he was appointed Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity, a position which he held until his death. He was a man of immense reading, keen mind, and was not without those qualities which Lord Byron thought essential to an historian,--wrath and partiality. For him alone Lowel
G. P. Lathrop (search for this): chapter 2
een and still are denizens of the University city. There has thus been no editor of the magazine, except Fields, who has not at some time dwelt in Cambridge. The following list comprises many of those who were during at least some period of the Atlantic's existence, if not the whole, to be classed as Cambridge authors, together with the total of contributions credited to each in the Atlantic Index, of 1888: W. D. Howells, 399; T. S. Perry, 355; H. E. Scudder, 196; O. W. Holmes, 18I; G. P. Lathrop, 168; W. F. Apthorp, 134; Henry James, Jr., 134; J. R. Lowell, 132; T. W. Higginson, 117; T. B. Aldrich, I I; John Fiske, 89; G. E. Woodberry, 73; H. W. Longfellow, 68; C. P. Cranch, 45; C. E. Norton, 44; N. S. Shaler, 32; R. W. Emerson, 29; Henry James, Sr., 19; W. W. Story, 17; Wilson Flagg, 14; William James, 12. This is, of course, a merely quantitative estimate, in which a brief critical paper may count for as much as the most important original work; but the point of interest is t
Francis H. Underwood (search for this): chapter 2
in 1853, four years sooner. The late Mr. Francis H. Underwood gave the fullest indication of this w It was the project of a young enthusiast [Mr. Underwood himself], who desired to enlist the leadined. With high regard, Truly yours, Francis H. Underwood. Boston, November 25, 1853. My Dea. In haste, Most gratefully yours, Francis H. Underwood. The magazine thus indicated, whic, who were to have been its publishers. Mr. Underwood himself says, in the same article, After lwith Emerson, Lowell, Motley, Holmes, Cabot, Underwood, and the publisher Phillips, to talk about teing of Cambridge birth or residence, since Underwood had lately removed thither. Assuming that the meeting of May 20th was that of which Underwood speaks, we know that Longfellow, Underwood, and Underwood, and Felton were there, and probably Holmes and Lowell, so that this company also was half or almost haly rate, the two original editors, Lowell and Underwood, were Cantabrigians by residence; and Lowell
J. E. Cabot (search for this): chapter 2
ys, in the same article, After long efforts the due cooperation was secured and responsible publishers were found to take it up. He elsewhere states, It was planned at a dinner where fourteen persons were present. This was presumably the dinner of which Longfellow says in his diary (May 20, 1857): Dined in town with the new Magazine Club, discussing title, etc., with no result. He has already spoken of a previous meeting (May 5), when he dined in town with Emerson, Lowell, Motley, Holmes, Cabot, Underwood, and the publisher Phillips, to talk about the new magazine the last wishes to establish. It will no doubt be done; though I am not so eager about it as the rest. Journal and letters, II. pp. 298, 299. Compare Phillips's letter in Cooke's J. S. Dwight, p. 243. There were apparently but eight persons at this dinner, one-half of these being of Cambridge birth or residence, since Underwood had lately removed thither. Assuming that the meeting of May 20th was that of which Underwo
James R. Lowell (search for this): chapter 2
ng title, etc., with no result. He has already spoken of a previous meeting (May 5), when he dined in town with Emerson, Lowell, Motley, Holmes, Cabot, Underwood, and the publisher Phillips, to talk about the new magazine the last wishes to establisth was that of which Underwood speaks, we know that Longfellow, Underwood, and Felton were there, and probably Holmes and Lowell, so that this company also was half or almost half made up of Cantabrigians. At any rate, the two original editors, LoweLowell and Underwood, were Cantabrigians by residence; and Lowell could now transfer to it, on a more liberal scale, the plans which he and Robert Carter had formed for the short-lived Pioneer. In the later period of the magazine, Howells at one time resLowell could now transfer to it, on a more liberal scale, the plans which he and Robert Carter had formed for the short-lived Pioneer. In the later period of the magazine, Howells at one time resided in Cambridge, as did, for a year, his successor, Aldrich. Its last two editors, Messrs. H. E. Scudder and W. H. Page, have been and still are denizens of the University city. There has thus been no editor of the magazine, except Fields, who ha
Tom Appleton (search for this): chapter 2
reformers; they committed fantastic follies, but so do the saints everywhere. As a result they distinctly influenced the national literature; much, for instance, of the power now attributed to Emerson being really the unconscious result of the total movement. Fame is very chary of personal rights; it is difficult to erect a new altar. Everything tends to concentrate on a single name, and just as for years every good thing said in Boston was ultimately attributed to Holmes or Motley or Tom Appleton, so one sees to this day phrases credited to Emerson which really belonged to Alcott or Parker or Hedge. The late John S. Dwight was perhaps more boldly robbed and complimented than any other of his circle; since his poem called Rest, --Sweet is the pleasure Itself cannot spoil; Is not true leisure One with true toil? still appears periodically as an occasional resurrection in the newspapers, but always as a translation from some supposed poem of Goethe. Dwight was very probably a div
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