hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) 180 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 162 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 150 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) 112 0 Browse Search
Cambridge 71 1 Browse Search
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Thomas Shepard 48 2 Browse Search
Artemas Ward 48 2 Browse Search
1895 AD 47 47 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman). Search the whole document.

Found 226 total hits in 137 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Jason Russell (search for this): chapter 17
5, hereafter be known, as it always should have been, as the day of the battle of Lexington, Concord, and Cambridge. More men were killed and wounded within the then limits of Cambridge than in all the other towns. With the names on the monument Dr. McKenzie also suggested adding the prophetic vision of Samuel Adams, Oh! what a glorious morning is this! The full inscription is: Erected by the city, A. D. 1870 to the memory of John Hicks,—William Marcy,—Moses Richardson, buried here. Jason Russell,—Jabez Wyman,—Jason Winship, buried in Menotomy. men of Cambridge, who fell in defence of the liberty of the people, April 19th, 1775. Oh! what a glorious morning is this! In searching in 1870, to find the place of burial preparatory to erecting this monument, excavations were made along the northerly line of the grounds, and several skulls were found with bullet holes, showing where some of our killed at Bunker Hill were buried; but the grave of Colonel Thomas Gardner, a prominen
s of his profession in hand, will yet be commissioned to scan every stone, monument, and all records, for the names of those resting in this consecrated ground of the Fathers. We certainly owe this, ere it is too late, to those who shall come after us. The city of Cambridge should add an honor to its semicenten-nial this year by erecting a simple monument or tablet near that of Jonathan Mitchel, in commemoration of Rev. Thomas Shepard, who died August 25, 1649. He made it possible for Cambridge to be honorably known everywhere as the University City. An eye-witness and historian of his time says, To make the whole world understand that spiritual learning was the thing they chiefly desired, to sanctify the other, and make the whole lump holy, and that learning, being set upon its right object, might not contend for error instead of truth, they chose this Place, being then under the orthodox and soul-flourishing Ministry of Mr. Thomas Shepheard. In 1885 the City Council placed
William Thaddeus Harris (search for this): chapter 17
covered with a massive stone block, on which is cut:— Here lyeth interred ye body of Major-General Gookin, aged 75 years, who departed this life ye 19th of March, 1686-7. The tomb probably contains the remains of his family, including his son, the Rev. Nathaniel Gookin. General Gookin was an influential man in the early days of the colony. Near this are the tombs of Governor Belcher, Dr. Gamage, the Watsons, and the Munroes, level with the sod and unmarked. In the year 1845, Mr. William Thaddeus Harris published a very useful book of epitaphs from this old ground, from the earliest date to the year 1800. In the years succeeding 1800, with a few exceptions, the names only, on the monuments erected since that date, are given. Therefore it is hoped that some modern Old Mortality, with the records of the first proprietors and the town, together with the needed tools of his profession in hand, will yet be commissioned to scan every stone, monument, and all records, for the names o
Jonas Wyeth (search for this): chapter 17
the headstone reads: Beneath this tomb rests the remains of Mr. John Hughes, of Norwich in Connecticut. He died in his country's cause, July ye 25th, A. D. 1775, in ye 21st year of his age. Reader, Death is a debt to nature due; As i have paid it, so must you. Another has a similar inscription to John Stearns, died August 22, 1775, aged 23 years. The mound, on the Garden Street side, incloses tombs of once prominent families, that of Deacon Gideon Frost, Deacon Josiah Moore, Major Jonas Wyeth, and probably of Israel Porter, of the Blue Anchor Hostelry. Opposite, in the centre of the grounds, is the most prominent tomb, with this inscription, and many more lines of obituary:— In this tomb are deposited the remains of Thomas Lee, Esquire, a native of Great Britain, but for many years a citizen of America. death released him from his sufferings May 26th, 1797, in the 60th year of his age. Near the front boundary is a brick monument, covered with a massive stone block, on
Josiah Quincy (search for this): chapter 17
ts the chapel. It is a massive monument, recalling our civil war by its inscription,— American Union preserved American Slavery destroyed by the uprising of a great people by the blood of fallen heroes The gateway to the cemetery is built of Quincy granite, the design being taken from the entrance to an Egyptian temple. It bears the following in bold raised letters:— Then shall the Dust return to the Earth as it was; and the Spirit shall return unto God who gave it. Near this, at:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory
Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 17
elebrated phrenologist; he died in 1832. Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the philosopher, the statesman, the patriot, who by his wisdom blessed his country, and h
Abraham Ireland (search for this): chapter 17
ngs of the family. Near by is the ancient mutilated milestone, first placed near the Old Court House, in the present Harvard Square, in 1734, on which is cut 8 miles to Boston, the above date, and the initials A. I., of him who cut and first placed it. This directed travelers the way to Boston through Roxbury, over the only bridge that then crossed Charles River, to Little Cambridge, now Brighton. The above initials are explained on a headstone near by: Here lyes buried the body of Mr. Abraham Ireland, who departed this life January 24th, 1753, in ye 81st year of his age. Pray God to give grace—To fly to Christ—To prepare for Eternity. In 1870, the city erected a simple but appropriate monument to mark the place of burial of a few of the Cambridge Minute-Men, killed April 19, 1775. On the occasion of its dedication, November 3, 1870, Rev. Dr. McKenzie delivered a very interesting and suggestive address. He said most eloquently that it was pleasant for us to remember that our d
John Adams (search for this): chapter 17
resent area is one hundred and thirty-six acres. The first recorded burial is that of a child of James Boyd, of Roxbury, July 6, 1832, on Mountain Avenue; the second, that of Mrs. Hastings, July 12, 1832, on the same avenue. On elevated ground, not far distant from the gateway, stands a chapel made of granite, of Gothic design. Within are marble statues, in a sitting position, of the late Judge Story, and of John Winthrop, the first governor of Massachusetts. Two others standing, of John Adams, the second president of the United States, and James Otis, the patriot. The Sphinx, the Egyptian symbol of might and intelligence, was erected in 1872, and fronts the chapel. It is a massive monument, recalling our civil war by its inscription,— American Union preserved American Slavery destroyed by the uprising of a great people by the blood of fallen heroes The gateway to the cemetery is built of Quincy granite, the design being taken from the entrance to an Egyptian temple. It b
Samuel Adams (search for this): chapter 17
aim the glory of Menotomy for the praise of Cambridge. Arlington may guard their dust, Cambridge will overleap the narrow brook and claim them for her own, and let the 19th of April, 1775, hereafter be known, as it always should have been, as the day of the battle of Lexington, Concord, and Cambridge. More men were killed and wounded within the then limits of Cambridge than in all the other towns. With the names on the monument Dr. McKenzie also suggested adding the prophetic vision of Samuel Adams, Oh! what a glorious morning is this! The full inscription is: Erected by the city, A. D. 1870 to the memory of John Hicks,—William Marcy,—Moses Richardson, buried here. Jason Russell,—Jabez Wyman,—Jason Winship, buried in Menotomy. men of Cambridge, who fell in defence of the liberty of the people, April 19th, 1775. Oh! what a glorious morning is this! In searching in 1870, to find the place of burial preparatory to erecting this monument, excavations were made along the northe
High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the philosopher, the statesman, the patriot, who by his wisdom blessed his country, and his age, and bequeathed to the world an illustrious example of industry, integrity, and self-culture. born in Boston, Mdccvi., died in Philadelphia, Mdccxc. The number of interments to January 1, 1896, is
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...