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lege; the holiday routes of the British to Concord and Lexington; the bloody routes of their return; the elm where Washington took command of the army, the mansion where he lived with Lady Washington, the little church that both attended; the site of the ramparts thrown up in the siege of Boston; the winding road—old Tory Row—by which the army of Washington marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; beautiful Mount Auburn,—the Westminster Abbey of New England, where at
burying ground where lie the early presidents of the college; the holiday routes of the British to Concord and Lexington; the bloody routes of their return; the elm where Washington took command of the army, the mansion where he lived with Lady Washington, the little church that both attended; the site of the ramparts thrown up in the siege of Boston; the winding road—old Tory Row—by which the army of Washington marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; beautiful Mount A<
Francis Cogswell (search for this): chapter 23
n admirably supplemented and strengthened by the gentlemen who have served as superintendents of schools since 1868: Edwin B. Hale, from 1868 until 1874, and Francis Cogswell, from 1874 to the present time. Whether guiding or executing progressive educational policies, Mr. Cogswell has shown rare wisdom and tact, and throughout hMr. Cogswell has shown rare wisdom and tact, and throughout his prolonged experience has enjoyed the uninterrupted confidence of his committee, the schools, and the public. It is usually understood that the first superintendent of schools in Massachusetts was appointed in Springfield in 1840. Cambridge records show, however, that the town warrant of March 17, 1836, contained an article e paid humble salaries, and who, as they prove their ability to do creditable work, are put into the schools of the city as substitutes or regular teachers. Mr. Cogswell has arranged an ingenious plan, under which capable pupils may regularly, and in classes, complete the six years course of the grammar schools in five years, a
John Adams (search for this): chapter 23
ith the world. In the latter part of the seventeenth century there was no education for women in England. Ladies highly born and bred, and naturally quick witted, could scarcely write a line without solecisms and faults in spelling that would shame a charity girl. Our forefathers were wise, said Lady Clarendon in 1685, in not giving their daughters the education of writing. I should be very much ashamed, she added, that I ever learned Latin, if I had not forgotten it. The wife of President John Adams, born in 1744, said that female education in her day, even in the best families, seldom went beyond writing and arithmetic, and that it was fashionable to ridicule female learning. Girls worked their way into the public schools as pupils very much as women worked their way into the same schools as teachers. At first, the public school teachers were men exclusively. Towards the latter part of the last century the town histories of Massachusetts give us glimpses of women taking cha
Henry W. Longfellow (search for this): chapter 23
n marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; beautiful Mount Auburn,—the Westminster Abbey of New England, where at every turn the names of the illustrious dead quicken one's memory of the history they shared in making,—these are but a part of the priceless heritage that is ours. Does the sense of their value ever become dull? Let the pilgrims that come to us in annually increasing numbers sharpen that sense, and nerve us to keep these memorials, so far as their keepi<
Josiah Hayward (search for this): chapter 23
his prolonged experience has enjoyed the uninterrupted confidence of his committee, the schools, and the public. It is usually understood that the first superintendent of schools in Massachusetts was appointed in Springfield in 1840. Cambridge records show, however, that the town warrant of March 17, 1836, contained an article with reference to employing a superintendent of schools, that the school committee, April 15, 1836, voted to employ one of their number in that capacity, that Josiah Hayward was accordingly elected superintendent, April 25, 1836, and that his salary was fixed at $250. The office was not kept up long in Cambridge; but in Springfield it was permanent, so that Springfield's claim to priority has a pretty solid basis. The high school system of Cambridge embraces practically three schools,—the Cambridge Latin School, under the head mastership of William F. Bradbury, with 14 teachers and 388 pupils; the Cambridge English High School, under the head mastership o
Justin A. Jacobs (search for this): chapter 23
ion of the town had had its home there under the eaves of the college. Corlett's tree was not to be pulled up by the roots and set out in a new and distant part of the town without a protest. Accordingly, the high school of 1838, although it was the town high school for five years, drew its pupils mainly from Cambridgeport. In 1843, the Otis schoolhouse, quite a magnificent structure, was completed for East Cambridge, and on its upper floor was opened a high and grammar school with Justin A. Jacobs and Miss Almira Seymour as teachers. At the same time, Richard T. Austin and Miss L. M. Damon were teachers in the Female High School of Old Cambridge. Thus, in 1843, the three sections or wards of the town had each its high school, with a man for its principal and a woman to assist him. The high school of Ward One, as we have seen, was for girls. Inasmuch as it also contained girls of grammar school grades, it was as often called a high and grammar school as a high school. The high
Frederick E. Chapman (search for this): chapter 23
s recently been introduced; also the Ling system of Swedish gymnastics. For eleven years Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw of Boston maintained three free kindergartens in Cambridge. A fourth was supported by a few Cambridge ladies. In 1889 the school committee assumed them as a part of the public school system and since that time have gradually added to their number until today there are eight kindergartens with 417 pupils and sixteen teachers. The city employs several special teachers. Mr. Frederick E. Chapman is director of music and Mr. James M. Stone director of drawing. There are also teachers of botany, gymnastics, and sewing. The city maintains one evening high school, four evening elementary schools, and one evening drawing school. It is sad that the blessings of school so prized by the vast majority of our citizens should fail to impress some of our number. Absenteeism in a bad sense has been heavily reduced since the founding of the city, but it still exists. Whatever it
Edward F. Barnes (search for this): chapter 23
but content, on the whole, to be known as the loyal ancestral shade of the Washington Grammar School. This is the reason why a brownstone tablet in the outer wall of the Washington building tells the reader that that school is the lineal descendant of the faire Grammar Schoole of 1643. The Cambridge High schools. In 1838 a high school was organized in Cambridgeport for the entire town, in a building erected for it at the corner of Broadway and Winsor Street. Its first teacher was Edward F. Barnes. This school, so I am informed by John Livermore, who was a member of the school committee as early as 1843, had girls as well as boys from its start. It was not convenient of access either for East Cambridge or for Old Cambridge. Moreover, it did not stand well in the graces of Old Cambridge. For two centuries the classical instruction of the town had had its home there under the eaves of the college. Corlett's tree was not to be pulled up by the roots and set out in a new and dis
Harry Ellis (search for this): chapter 23
e English High School, Mr. Bradbury continuing as head master of the Latin School. In 1892 the English High School moved into its present commodious and beautiful building on Broadway, between Trowbridge and Ellery streets. This structure was erected on land presented to the city by Frederick H. Rindge and at a cost to the city of $230,000. In September, 1888, the Cambridge Manual Training School for Boys, founded and maintained by Mr. Rindge, and placed under the superintendence of Harry Ellis, was opened to the boys of the English High School. As soon as the building at the corner of Broadway and Fayette Street was vacated by the English High School, it was remodeled and put into excellent order for the Latin School, which took possession of it September 6, 1892. The growth of the school has made it necessary to plan a new building for it, to cost not far from $250,000, and to stand on land adjacent to the English High School building and the Public Library. Upon the co
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