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Edward Goffe (search for this): chapter 23
duated in 1642. In the work of fitting boys for Harvard, Cambridge would naturally have had an early and prominent share. It chimes in with this theory of an earlier school that Mr. Corlett, when we first hear of him in 1643, was already in the possession of an established reputation as a teacher; he had very well approved himself for his abilities, dexterity and painfulnesse. His schoolhouse— the first one especially built for him in 1648, not by the town, but by President Dunster and Edward Goffe—was on the westerly side of Holyoke Street, between Harvard and Mount Auburn streets. At one time there were in his lattin schoole five Indian youths fitting for college. In 1642 the General Court made it the duty of Cambridge as of other towns to insist that parents and masters should properly educate their children, and to fine them if they neglected to do so. In 1647 the Court ordered the towns to appoint teachers for the children, whose wages should be paid either by the parents or
Edwin B. Hale (search for this): chapter 23
. Thus the board is practically a continuous body, always containing a majority that have had experience in school management. The mayor is chairman ex officio. The best men and women of the city respond freely to the public demand for their service on the board, and the list of past members contains many a name of state and even national reputation. This service has been admirably supplemented and strengthened by the gentlemen who have served as superintendents of schools since 1868: Edwin B. Hale, from 1868 until 1874, and Francis Cogswell, from 1874 to the present time. Whether guiding or executing progressive educational policies, Mr. Cogswell has shown rare wisdom and tact, and throughout his prolonged experience has enjoyed the uninterrupted confidence of his committee, the schools, and the public. It is usually understood that the first superintendent of schools in Massachusetts was appointed in Springfield in 1840. Cambridge records show, however, that the town warrant
Frederick H. Rindge (search for this): chapter 23
as head master of the Latin School. In 1892 the English High School moved into its present commodious and beautiful building on Broadway, between Trowbridge and Ellery streets. This structure was erected on land presented to the city by Frederick H. Rindge and at a cost to the city of $230,000. In September, 1888, the Cambridge Manual Training School for Boys, founded and maintained by Mr. Rindge, and placed under the superintendence of Harry Ellis, was opened to the boys of the English HMr. Rindge, and placed under the superintendence of Harry Ellis, was opened to the boys of the English High School. As soon as the building at the corner of Broadway and Fayette Street was vacated by the English High School, it was remodeled and put into excellent order for the Latin School, which took possession of it September 6, 1892. The growth of the school has made it necessary to plan a new building for it, to cost not far from $250,000, and to stand on land adjacent to the English High School building and the Public Library. Upon the completion of this building, Cambridge will be ab
Washington (search for this): chapter 23
children to bring excuses from their parents before being allowed to take their seats. Such works as Sparks's Lives of Washington and Franklin should be placed in school libraries,—an invaluable substitute for juvenile romances and cheap newspaper ne college; the holiday routes of the British to Concord and Lexington; the bloody routes of their return; the elm where Washington took command of the army, the mansion where he lived with Lady Washington, the little church that both attended; the siLady Washington, the little church that both attended; the site of the ramparts thrown up in the siege of Boston; the winding road—old Tory Row—by which the army of Washington marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis,Washington marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and nea
minished. The habit of truth-telling had gained ground. The duty of reverence was strongly urged in the report of 1845,—reverence to parents, to one's self, to teachers, to magistrates, and to all superiors in years and goodness. Classes were still too large for the teachers. Cambridge was still outstripped by twenty-three towns and cities of the Commonwealth in the amount of money raised per child for schooling, Somerville raising $7.64, Boston $6.76, Chelsea $5.58, Charlestown $5.09, Newton $4.26, and Cambridge $3.95. Still, Cambridge had risen from the thirty-fifth place the proceding year to the twenty-fourth, and that was cause for congratulation. The committee, however, did not think it should be an object of ambition what town will expend the most money, but what town can produce the best schools. Here the records must be dropped. Even in their fullness, the story they tell is somewhat meagre; and it is only a snatch or two from that story that is given here. It
Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 23
udacity to venture upon Latin and even Greek in the college classes of the school. It was doubtless such a school as Edward Everett described in his address at the dedication of the Cambridge High School building, June 27, 1848. He remembered as yesterday (Everett was born in Dorchester in 1794) his first going to the village school, how he trudged along at the valiant age of three, one hand grasping his elder sister's apron, and the other his little blue paper-covered primer, and how, when aadside and greet him,—the girls with a courtesy and the boys with a bow. A little reading, writing, and ciphering, added Everett, a very little grammar, and for those destined for college a little Latin and Greek, very indifferently taught, were allstarted under propitious skies. It began in a new building erected for it at the corner of Amory and Summer streets, Edward Everett, president of Harvard College, giving the dedicatory address,—an eloquent and inspiring effort. There were at once o
Richard T. Austin (search for this): chapter 23
rlett's tree was not to be pulled up by the roots and set out in a new and distant part of the town without a protest. Accordingly, the high school of 1838, although it was the town high school for five years, drew its pupils mainly from Cambridgeport. In 1843, the Otis schoolhouse, quite a magnificent structure, was completed for East Cambridge, and on its upper floor was opened a high and grammar school with Justin A. Jacobs and Miss Almira Seymour as teachers. At the same time, Richard T. Austin and Miss L. M. Damon were teachers in the Female High School of Old Cambridge. Thus, in 1843, the three sections or wards of the town had each its high school, with a man for its principal and a woman to assist him. The high school of Ward One, as we have seen, was for girls. Inasmuch as it also contained girls of grammar school grades, it was as often called a high and grammar school as a high school. The high schools of Wards Two and Three were for both sexes, that of Ward Two bei
Margaret Fuller (search for this): chapter 23
ord children included both sexes, that the public schools, in short, were as much for girls as for boys; so that we have in this rule of 1832 an official recognition of what had been gradually coming into practice in Cambridge,—co-education in high school subjects. Years before this date ambitious girls might have been found here and there, more frequently in private schools than in public, working close up to the college doors, although it was hopeless for them to enter there, like Margaret Fuller, of Cambridgeport, subsequently Countess Ossoli, who in 1816, at the age of six, was studying Latin with her father, and whom we see again nine years later reciting Greek in the C. P. P. G. S., that is, in the Cambridge Port Private Grammar School,—a school for classical instruction where Richard Henry Dana and Oliver Wendell Holmes were among her schoolmates. Here was coeducation in secondary subjects, though not in a public school, as early as 1825. In the same year a high school fo
James Russell Lowell (search for this): chapter 23
ch that both attended; the site of the ramparts thrown up in the siege of Boston; the winding road—old Tory Row—by which the army of Washington marched out of Cambridge for New York and by which, not long after, the army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; beautiful Mount Auburn,—the Westminster Abbey of New England, where at every turn the names of the illustrious dead quicken one's memory of the history they shared in making,—these are but a part of the priceless heritage that is ours. Does the sense of their value ever become dull?
John P. Putnam (search for this): chapter 23
ek, or to what we call the general-culture purposes of life? It is just this schooling that the English High School aims to provide. Cambridge has nine grammar schools, each for both sexes, with six grades of pupils. The following table of these schools is based on the data of December, 1895:— Schools.When founded.Teachers.Pupils.Principals. Allston184814571Benjamin W. Roberts. Harvard184119742James S. Barrell. Morse189011414Mary A. Townsend. Peabody18897295Frederick S. Cutter. Putnam184518688Thomas W. Davis. Shepard185212449Edward O. Grover. Thorndike186113488Ruel H. Fletcher. Washington184214453John W. Freese. Webster185317685John D. Billings. Wellington18845 Assisted by the training class.435Herbert H. Bates. The history and work of these great schools merit a larger notice than is here possible. It may be said in passing that Mr. Roberts has been principal of the Allston School from its beginning. At the age of eighty, he shows the vigor and progressive
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