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nd there may they remain forever. [Enthusiastic cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our friend could not be heard in Faneuil Hall. That glorious old name does not belong to bricks and mortar. As the Scottish chief boasted that where McGregor sits is the head of the table, so where Freedom dwells, where all lips are free, wherever the foe of slavery is welcome, no matter whether an English or an African sun may have looked upon him, there is Faneuil Hall. [Cheers.] Ubi Libertas, ibi patria was Franklin's motto, which Bancroft's lines render well enough,--Where dwell the brave, the generous, and the free, Oh, there is Rome — no other Rome for me. [Cheers.] Our welcome to George Thompson to-night is only the joy we have in grasping his hand, and seeing him with our own eyes. But we do not feel that, for the last fifteen years, he has been absent from us, much less from the battle to whose New England phalanx we welcome him to-night. Every blow struck for the r
sh character in one of Lever's novels, I believe, who first proclaimed that he had rather, at any time, knock a man down, than argue with him; but the preference seems to have found now admirers off of the Green Isle. [Cheers.] I am not sure, Mr. Chairman, that we are correct, after all, in ascribing all this indignation in the city to the fear of national rebuke at the hands of Mr. Thompson. I am afraid it was no such honorable sentiment as the dread of being held up to the gaze of other natiCheers.] Thank God, November has ripened this evidence for us. We have set up a mile-stone of progress which the blindest can feel, if he cannot see. [Cheers.] That a large party should follow Mr. Webster anywhere is not surprising. You know, Mr. Chairman, I was once among that crowd who are said to be bred to the bar, --and very kind of them surely, since the bar is never bread to them. Well, sir, I remember an insurance case which illustrates my meaning. You recollect that when an insured a
omed by the heart, if he could not be by the pocket of the Commonwealth. [Cheers.] There is Horace Mann in, and Charles W. Upham out, and there they will remain forever. [Cheers.] There is George S. Boutwell in, and George N. Briggs out, and there may they remain forever. [Enthusiastic cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our friend could not be heard in Faneuil Hall. That glorious old name does not belong to bricks and mortar. As the Scottish chief boasted that where McGregor sits is the head of the table, so where Freedom dwells, where all lips are free, wherever the foe of slavery is welcome, no matter whether an English or an African sun may have looked upon him, there is Faneuil Hall. [Cheers.] Ubi Libertas, ibi patria was Franklin's motto, which Bancroft's lines render well enough,--Where dwell the brave, the generous, and the free, Oh, there is Rome — no other Rome for me. [Cheers.] Our welcome to George Thompson to-night is only the joy we have in gr
ne scale and free speech into the other; it needs no ghost to tell which will kick the beam. It was the love of free thought and free speech, burning in this same Saxon blood of ours, that, two hundred years ago, translated the Bible out of dead tongues into living speech. That work cost the upsetting of one or two kingdoms, and the downfall of a great church. Here and now the same love of freedom and the same Saxon blood are engaged in translating liberty out of dead professions into living practice. It will be no matter of surprise, if so great a work cost a Union or two; but what is that to us? See thou, creature of Union, knowing no higher law than last word of that prayer-book formula, will verily be, amazement. Woe to the statesman who waves his bit of red cloth in the face.of that mad bull, a full-blooded Saxon roused to the suspicion, however unfounded, that somebody is plotting to prevent his tongue from wagging as it lists! It was the weight of the hand of Charles I
he South and the nation should understand Massachusetts. Mr. Webster has been trying to persuade everybody that he is the State. Some leading presses have labored to show that Webster, Whigdom, and Massachusetts were identical. While things remainee cannot see. [Cheers.] That a large party should follow Mr. Webster anywhere is not surprising. You know, Mr. Chairman, I ws an inherent defect in the article. [Cheers.] Now when Mr. Webster, standing on that majestic height whence the hopes of thiser may be considered posted on this point. I remember Mr. Webster once said, in reply to some taunt of Hayne's, There is Mlls. The Sultan might well have pleaded, in the face of Mr. Webster's recent eloquence, that fear of dethronement, anarchy, ng Kossuth. Would the world, would humanity, would even Mr. Webster, have said Amen to such a plea from his mouth? There maace, make ready to sweep clean the continent, and see that Webster, Foot, and Dickinson be the Shem, Ham, and Japlet of the A
Charles W. Upham (search for this): chapter 7
eply to some taunt of Hayne's, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is Concord and Lexington and Bunker Hill, and there they will remain forever. Let us borrow the formula, and when anybody in the United States Senate doubts our position, let us cry, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is George Thompson, welcomed by the heart, if he could not be by the pocket of the Commonwealth. [Cheers.] There is Horace Mann in, and Charles W. Upham out, and there they will remain forever. [Cheers.] There is George S. Boutwell in, and George N. Briggs out, and there may they remain forever. [Enthusiastic cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our friend could not be heard in Faneuil Hall. That glorious old name does not belong to bricks and mortar. As the Scottish chief boasted that where McGregor sits is the head of the table, so where Freedom dwells, where all lips are free, wherever the foe of slavery is welc
Shakspeare (search for this): chapter 7
ars, he has been absent from us, much less from the battle to whose New England phalanx we welcome him to-night. Every blow struck for the right in England is felt wherever English is spoken. We may have declared political independence, but while we speak our mother-tongue, the sceptre of intellect can never depart from Judah,--the mind of America must ever be, to a great extent, the vassal of England. Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere, and whoever hangs with rapture over Shakspeare, kindles with Sidney and Milton, or prays in the idiom of the English Bible, London legislates for him. [Cheers.] When, therefore, Great Britain abolished slavery in the West Indies, she settled the policy of every land which the Saxon race rules; for all such, the question is now only one of time. Every word, therefore, that our friend has spoken for the slave at home, instead of losing power has gained it from the position he occupied, since he was pouring the waters of life into the ve
Horace Mann (search for this): chapter 7
ugitives from his own party that hardly enough were left to count them. [Cheers.] Now, at least, the question is settled where Massachusetts stands; so unequivocally, that even the Daily Advertiser, which never announced the nomination of Horace Mann until after he was elected [cheers and laughter], even that late riser may be considered posted on this point. I remember Mr. Webster once said, in reply to some taunt of Hayne's, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves!he United States Senate doubts our position, let us cry, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is George Thompson, welcomed by the heart, if he could not be by the pocket of the Commonwealth. [Cheers.] There is Horace Mann in, and Charles W. Upham out, and there they will remain forever. [Cheers.] There is George S. Boutwell in, and George N. Briggs out, and there may they remain forever. [Enthusiastic cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our
he world from my house; but surely there are circumstances, as in the case of a man dying on my threshold, where it would be gross inhumanity, utter sin before God, to exercise that right. Surely, the slave's claim on us is equal. How exactly level to the world's worst idea of a Yankee, this pocket argument that the Commonwealth would suffer by yielding to its noblest instincts; that Massachusetts cannot now afford to be humane, to open her arms, a refuge, in the words of her own statute of 1642, for all who fly to her from the tyranny and oppression of their persecutors! In 1850, our poor, old, heavy-laden mother must leave that luxury to Turks and other uncalculating barbarians! We Christians must take thought for the morrow, and count justice, humanity, and all that, mere fine words! But is the slave a foreigner? Not, surely, when we pledge our whole physical force to his master to keep him in chains! Were the surrender clause the only clause in our Constitution relating to
November 15th, 1850 AD (search for this): chapter 7
Welcome to George Thompson (1840). A reception to George Thompson, in Faneuil Hall, November 15, 1850, was broken up by an angry mob. The meeting was therefore adjourned to Worcester, and supplemented by other meetings in several cities. At the reception in Lynn, November 26, 1850, Mr. Phillips delivered the following speech:-- This is certainly, fellow-citizens, a glad sight for my eloquent friend to look upon; these enthusiastic crowds, pressing to extend to him a welcome, and do their part in atonement for the scenes of 1835, and to convince him that even now, not as Boston speaks so speaks the State [cheers]; and yet, it is not in our power, my friends, with all our numbers or zeal, to tender to our guest so real, so impressive a compliment as that with which Faneuil Hall flattered him, the 15th day of this month. Indignation, it has been well said, is itself flavored with a season of compliment. How potent has a man a right to consider his voice, when a whole nation r
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