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Jesus Christ (search for this): chapter 8
e]—who are not willing that any man shall judge them in respect of a holy day, or the new moon, or the Sabbath—and who mean to stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made them free, and not to be entangled again with the yoke of bondage. Its supporters do not rely solely upon reason, argument, persuasion, but also upon tyled sacred or profane) to the contrary notwithstanding; holding, nevertheless, that Non-Resistance is taught in the precepts, and illustrated in the life, of Jesus Christ; and, therefore, that no man who rejects the doctrine is entitled to be called a Christian or a disciple of Christ. Why, he asked, should we go to a book to Christ. Why, he asked, should we go to a book to settle the character of war, when we could judge of it by its fruits? Lib. 19.3; cf. 19.6. As the spring approached, it became more and more manifest that Mr. Garrison's system had not recovered from the effects of his Ohio fever. Not only rest but treatment seemed necessary, and both inclination and counsel—H. C. Wright's a<
e did not do so, is something to his credit. A pulpit Abdiel is seldom found in any land. He was, moreover, a doctor of divinity—by title, one of the class so correctly described by the intrepid reprover, Isaiah (lvi. 10). But, though a D. D., he was not a dumb dog. Probably no one cared for titles less than himself. Compare him, in moral intrepidity, in popular Ante, 2.106. usefulness, in reformatory labors, with the Rev. Dr. Codman, John Codman. Leonard Woods. Heman Humphrey. Rev. Dr. Woods, Rev. Dr. Humphrey, and a host of others, and what pigmies they are by his side! His preeminence was not intellectual—for he had not an extraordinary intellect— but moral, religious, humane, in the largest and best use of those terms. He was utterly divorced from bigotry and sectarism. He believed in eternal progress, and therefore never stood still, but went onward—if not rapidly, without faltering. He changed his views and positions from time to time, but only to advance—never t
F. Jackson (search for this): chapter 8
n ( Life of Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 205.) In December, 1847, Dr. Ruggles, hearing of his relapse, had Ms. Dec. 6, 1847. offered Mr. Garrison gratuitous treatment; but not until the following July did the patient present himself. July 17, 1848. Edmund Quincy, with inexhaustible self-abnegation, again granted this release to his friend by assuming the Lib. 18.110. conduct of the Liberator, while Francis Jackson and Wendell MSS. July 13, 1848, W. L. G. to F. Jackson; Oct. 5 (?), Phillips to Jackson. Phillips conspired with others to defray Garrison's personal expenses and lighten his domestic burden. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Northampton, July 18, 1848. Ms. The trip in the cars to this place, yesterday, was much more pleasant than the one I took with Fanny, as the heat was much Helen Frances Garrison. less intense; but the dust and smoke were quite as disagreeable—so that I was not sorry when I arrived at the depot. There I met with our old friend David Lee Child, whom
Henry Clay (search for this): chapter 8
Phillips and Charles Francis Adams, and with the assistance of Joshua R. Giddings; and in other parts of the State, as Mr. Garrison's letters have just shown, the agitation was carried on during the month of July. The Conscience Whigs of Massachusetts were in revolt Lib. 18.94, 98, 102. against the action of their party at Philadelphia on June 7, when the popular hero of the Mexican War, Gen. Zachary Taylor, a Louisiana slaveholder, was nominated for President, in disregard of the claims of Clay and of Webster. Of these standing candidates in petto Mr. Garrison declared in May (Lib. 18: 74): Nothing can be more fallacious than their expectations. To those who have asked us privately, for the last twelve months, who would in our opinion be the Presidential candidate of the Whig Party, our reply has been, unhesitatingly and emphatically—Zachary Taylor. Press nominations of Taylor began as far back as the date indicated (Lib. 17: 61). Before the Buffalo Convention assembled, Mr
Theodore Parker (search for this): chapter 8
e thought the Sabbath laws were a dead-letter. Theodore Parker, however, as in the time of the Ante, 2.422-4ess disturbed than his Unitarian brother: Theodore Parker to W. L. Garrison. Boston, Jan. 9, 1848. Msbeen obtained: W. L. Garrison, Francis Jackson, Theodore Parker, Edmund Jackson, Charles F. Hovey, A rich, mon, 90, 91; Pierce's Life of Sumner, 2: 294). and Theodore Parker; with supplementary ones by Charles K. Whipple.ays for secular entertainments, and on Sundays by Mr. Parker's congregation as their meeting-house. The orthome paper styled him, successfully opposed such of Mr. Parker's resolutions as deprecated a Lib. 18.51. Sundaynt, but he chose rather to refer his readers to Theodore Parker's sermon upon him, tempering its excessive praid so he did his best upon his own. . . . In Theodore Parker Mr. Garrison found the accessibility and sympatd infant, Elizabeth Pease, he naturally turned to Mr. Parker for ministrations of comfort which were gladly re
ought that it was the manner and the spirit of the abolitionists, and not the object they sought to accomplish, that so greatly excited the country, especially the Southern portion of it; and so, to set them a good example—to show them how easily they might propitiate the slaveholders while pleading for the emancipation of their slaves—he wrote his work on Ante, 1.439, 466; 2.54, etc. slavery, the circulation of which was deemed incendiary at the South, and the publication of which caused Gen. Waddy Cf. ante, 1.466, 467; 2.57; and Lib. 23.154. Thompson of South Carolina to exclaim, on the floor of Congress, that Dr. Channing was playing second fiddle to Garrison and Thompson. This was an instructive experiment to Geo. Thompson. the Doctor, and he did not fail to profit by it. In 1853, having occasion to review the incident of his meeting with Dr. Channing at the State House (ante, 2: 96), Mr. Garrison wrote (Lib. 23: 154): When Dr. Channing took me by the hand, it was only an ac
Martin Buren (search for this): chapter 8
e Soil Party, slavery will still exist and flourish; but if it stop there, it had better never have been born. Whigs and Democrats managed the Buffalo Lib. 18.131. Convention that resulted in placing before the country the nominations of Martin Van Buren for President, and Charles Francis Adams for Vice-President, on a platform of Free Soil, Free Speech, Free Labor, and Free Men [wherever slavery is not established already]. Lib. 18.142. The Liberty Party representatives were there to yieldrnest appeals must be made to our friends to preserve their integrity, and not to lose sight of the true issue. Already, in this region, I hear it said that a number of those who have hitherto acted with us think they can now vote, even for Martin Van Buren! What infatuation! As the election drew nigh, Quincy wrote to Webb (Ms. Oct. 3, 1848), that the Free Soil fever has carried off multitudes of our abolitionists, and it is to be feared that many of them will never recover themselves.
Zachary Taylor (search for this): chapter 8
fection from the Taylor and Cass ranks, in this section of the Zachary Taylor. State, appears to be considerable, and is every day increasingdelphia on June 7, when the popular hero of the Mexican War, Gen. Zachary Taylor, a Louisiana slaveholder, was nominated for President, in diWhig Party, our reply has been, unhesitatingly and emphatically—Zachary Taylor. Press nominations of Taylor began as far back as the date indTaylor began as far back as the date indicated (Lib. 17: 61). Before the Buffalo Convention assembled, Mr. Garrison betook himself to the water-cure, and it fell to Quincy to cous in the premises, and refusing to support either Lewis Cass or Zachary Taylor. He had at once received the nomination of the Barnburners' Cono side. Party Lib. 18.150. affiliations kept him from supporting Taylor, and for Cass he lacked the philosophy of Douglas, who advised the et the man, and they [of the North] the measure. The election of Taylor—a necessary choice of evils— had its chief significance for the abo<
John Bernard Fitzpatrick (search for this): chapter 8
by Cf. Whittier's Prose Works, 2.216. mentioning it in the same sentence with Nat. P. Rogers's), when Mrs. Chapman suggested that some of the priests might put it in the way of getting to him. So I proceeded to call upon the Bishop of Boston, Fitzpatrick by name, the more John Bernard Fitzpatrick. willingly as I had a curiosity to make the acquaintance of a live Catholic Bishop. I sent up my card, and was graciously received and my business taken in charge. His Lordship then wished to knoJohn Bernard Fitzpatrick. willingly as I had a curiosity to make the acquaintance of a live Catholic Bishop. I sent up my card, and was graciously received and my business taken in charge. His Lordship then wished to know if I was the individual that was endeavoring to destroy the Sabbath, whose Call he had seen. Upon my confessing the soft impeachment, he said that he should like to see how the parsons would answer it; that it was impregnable on Protestant grounds; that Scripture was clear against the Puritanico-Judaic Sabbath; that the observation of the First Day rested on the Canons of the Church, like that of other holidays, etc. He liked the movement, evidently, very much. He knew all about me and the
John P. Hale (search for this): chapter 8
r agitation alone, continued Mr. Quincy, that kept the Third Party alive until it was merged in the Independent Democratic Party by the nomination of Mr. Hale. J. P. Hale. Hale had, very deliberately, accepted the Liberty Party's Lib. 18.17. nomination, declining to take the badge of its name, but consenting to its ends. Soone drawing up of the platform, they could have produced a better. In the conference committee over the nominations, Henry B. Stanton was authorized to say that John P. Hale would submit to the action of the Convention; and when Van Buren led largely on the first ballot, Joshua Leavitt completed the suicide of the Liberty Party by ena, John Quincy Adams, had, indeed, Feb. 23, 1848; Lib. 18.35, 40. been taken away by death; but his place had been more than made good by Giddings, Palfrey, and Hale, as could be measured by their action to rid the District of slavery Lib. 18.69, 73, 77, 119, 202, 206. and the slave-trade. Mr. Garrison might well have left on
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